A Place at the Table:  Bellows Falls’  Popolo Restaurant Feeds the Future
Oct02

A Place at the Table: Bellows Falls’ Popolo Restaurant Feeds the Future

By Nicole Colson In the case of Popolo, it truly did take a village to open a restaurant. The neo-rustic Italian farm-to-table eatery in downtown Bellows Falls, named for the Italian word for “people,” came into existence because of the people who wanted a stake in the future of their community. “We went door to door asking people if they wanted to participate,” said Gary Smith, one of the restaurant’s three founding partners. The idea worked: there are 26 shareholders who invested in Popolo, which opened in the spring of 2012. “People are continually supportive,” Smith says. “There aren’t many community-owned restaurants anywhere.” Popolo’s opening is one part of the building’s living history. The restaurant is situated in the Windham Hotel building. The original hotel burned in 1932 and was rebuilt the following year. The four-story hotel closed in the 1960s, and, after a coffee shop on the ground floor closed in the early ’80s, most of the space sat unoccupied for many years. A music producer who helped shape the rise of alternative rock in the ’80s, Smith came to Bellows Falls in 2002, moving his studio from its original location in Roxbury, Mass., where it had been in business since 1986. Among the many artists who recorded at the studio over the years are the Pixies, Natalie Merchant, Radiohead, Weezer, and Warren Zevon. Smith set up a music venue and recording space in a corner of the former hotel. Along with Charles Hunter, original producer of the Roots on the River music festival in town, Smith hosted a three-year series of live performances in what was the lobby of the hotel. The Windham Development Group purchased the property in 2005. After one other party attempted to open a restaurant there, Smith got in contact with Tony Elliot (a friend and head of the group that owns the building) with his own idea. Smith, also president of the local radio station, approached board members Kristen Fehrenbach and John-Michael Maciejewski, who have culinary experience, in early 2011 and the three developed the business plan for Popolo. The restaurant menu was designed to be casual enough to order pizza or a burger with a level of sophistication at the other end to include a dish such as pan-roasted cod with a potato gnocchi and lemon parmigiano emulsion. Everything in Popolo’s kitchen is fresh and prepared from scratch—from sauces to hand-cut vegetables. As of this year, most ingredients are locally sourced. “We had a shareholders meeting early this year during which we agreed we wanted to connect area farmers to consumers,” Smith says. Menu items procured from nearby farms are clearly...

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Impeccable pedigree: Windham Antiques Center puts Bellows Falls on the map
Oct02

Impeccable pedigree: Windham Antiques Center puts Bellows Falls on the map

By Katherine P. Cox It’s a classic story: visitors to Vermont stop in a small town or village and are smitten with its charm and beauty. Next thing you know, they’ve left their old life behind and moved here for good. It was a simple stop for gas that changed Michael Bruno’s life. Some 10 years ago, Bruno, 35 who grew up on Long Island, N.Y., was working as a gemologist for Tiffany & Co. in Manhattan. Passing through Bellows Falls, he was struck by the town’s notable architecture. As a history buff, he says, he “really loved the historic downtown, with its level of preservation.” Before long, he decided to buy a house, fix it up and make a go of it. It being his passion for antique jewelry from the Georgian (1700-1830) and Victorian (1830-1900) eras. Bruno operated a small jewelry business out of his home then quickly outgrew the space and rented a small storefront downtown, where he began expanding into antiques. “It ended up doing better than we expected,” Bruno says. But it was in 2010 when he really established his place in Bellows Falls, buying the former Sam’s Army-Navy store on The Square—”it was an anchor building to downtown [that] had such great retail potential”— and turning it into Windham Antique Center, a stunning antiques store that draws people from all over New England and beyond. Bruno received a tax credit from the state tax credit program for historic buildings to upgrade the place and bring it up to code. A $50,000 loan from the Town of Rockingham Revolving Loan Fund allowed him to make needed renovations. That fund, he says, has helped a lot of businesses get off the ground. “We paid it back shortly after we opened,” he explains. After a year and a half of renovations, Windham Antique Center opened in January 2011. The look Bruno envisioned was a turn-of-the-last-century department store with niche sections arrayed throughout the two floors of the building. According to Jon Midura, who manages the shop, the team tried to capture the feel of a 19th century museum that’s being unpacked for an installation. ’That sense of history…’ A multiple-dealer shop specializing in 18th and 19th century furniture, the 7,000-square-foot store is a treasure trove of antiques of impeccable pedigree that takes browsers back in time. It’s that sense of history that initially captivated Bruno and informed his interest in antiques, and it’s what he says drives the popularity of his store. “You can own a piece for not a lot of money and purchase something that has a story, authenticity, and great craftsmanship,” Bruno says,...

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Mountains of art: Autumn hiking along the Long Trail and West River Trail
Oct02

Mountains of art: Autumn hiking along the Long Trail and West River Trail

By Jen Williams Chasing along the spine of the Green Mountains, southern Vermont towns that were once primarily farming and ski communities are today some of the state’s most vital arts and outdoors hubs. Indeed, it is the land itself that has both inspired and fully integrated the arts into its environment. Here, you’ll find the best of both worlds: a nature escape and cultural immersion. Visit vibrant villages with enriching arts. Nearby, find fiery fall colors amid a peaceful, natural setting on historic hiking trails. With its lush valleys and rolling mountains, southern Vermont’s landscape is an ideal base for exploring the arts and the great outdoors. Vermont is 76 percent forested and has the greatest concentration of sugar and red maples in the United States, creating those red and orange hillsides that nature lovers, plein air painters, and photographers travel far and wide for. It’s a fact that Vermont boasts the most brilliant fall foliage colors, but did you also know that while in Vermont you’re often in the company of artists? Vermont ranks third in the nation for artists as a percentage of its workforce—and ranks second for writers and eighth for both musicians and photographers. In essence, Vermont arts are as rich as the soil, vibrant as fall foliage, and steadfast as hikers on the trail. See it—live it—for yourself. The Killington region offers thriving city arts in Rutland as well as Vermont’s second-highest summit, Killington Peak. Along Route 4, the Crossroad of Vermont Byway, visit Killington Arts Guild. In Rutland, visit Paramount Theatre, a lively hub for national acts appearing in an exquisitely restored 1912 opera house. In West Rutland, situated at an historic marble quarry, The Carving Studio and Sculpture Center offers residencies, exhibits, workshops, and public arts events. Additional options include West Rutland Art Park, Castleton Downtown Gallery, and Chaffee Art Center. The city’s several public murals are also a delight. The Appalachian Trail and Long Trail share the same footpath in this part of Vermont and come within 0.2 miles of the summit; the spur trail to the summit is well worth it, boasting views of New York’s Adirondacks and the White Mountains in New Hampshire. South of Killington, from Route 140 in Wallingford, the Long Trail passes through White Rocks National Recreation Area within the Green Mountain National Forest. A 3.2-mile round trip hike leads to a garden of rock cairns. Photograph these then create your own. Visiting Manchester, you’ll find the village itself is an arts hub with galleries and museums also found in multiple nearby towns. Plus, the Long Trail is conveniently accessed just outside the village from...

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Wine Observed: An Apple a Day
Oct02

Wine Observed: An Apple a Day

By Marty Ramsburg Eleanor Leger dropped by our shop, Windham Wines, with a bottle of the first vintage of Eden Ice Cider eight years ago. I took one sip and knew that we would be cheerleaders. Eden Ice Cider was delicious then and its new iterations have raised the high bar even higher. Ice cider is a dessert wine based on the same concept of ice wines: freezing the berry or, in the case of apples, the cider, to crystallize the water content, thus separating water from concentrated juice. Unlike ice wine, however, ice cider is a recent phenom with New World origins. Vintner Christian Barthomeuf, who migrated from Provence to Canada in the 1970s, is credited with developing ice cider in the 1990s. Eden Specialty Ciders was Vermont’s first ice cider producer. Eleanor and her husband, Albert, first tasted ice cider while visiting Albert’s sister in Montreal in the winter of 2006. To Eleanor and Albert, it was an epiphany—why not do this in Vermont? As Eleanor observed, it felt like it was a way of “expressing Vermont ‘terroir’ right for our climate and for our 300-plus-year history of apple growing.” While Albert’s family is Canadian, Eleanor’s family is from the Northeast Kingdom, settling in the Craftsbury/Glover area in the 1790s. The couple had a farm in West Charleston and, after that fateful visit to Montreal, they decided to try their hand at making ice cider. Eleanor began researching orchards and taking courses in cider making. Did you know that there are at least 15,000 named varieties of apples just in the United States? How does a neophyte determine from which to make cider? It did not take long for Eleanor to discover Scott Farm in Dummerston, one of the few orchards growing heirloom and cider varieties. Scott Farm harbors approximately 120 apple varieties. Scott Farm’s orchardist, Zeke Goodband, arrived in 2001 when Scott Farm had only a half-dozen apple varieties, all the usual suspects, mostly Macintosh, with some Cortland, Empire, Red Delicious, Paula Red, and Jonagold. Goodband defines an heirloom apple as a variety that has been around for 100 years or more but is not generally grown commercially. So how did Goodband go from six varieties in 2001 to the range of heirloom apples that led Eleanor there as early as spring of 2006? Goodband’s apple odyssey began more than 40 years ago when he came across abandoned orchards while working in Maine. He made a deal with the owners to prune and tend the trees in exchange for harvesting the fruit and some cuttings. Through the years of exploring old orchards, he came across trees...

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Masterworks maker: Frances Alford’s lifetime of creativity
Oct02

Masterworks maker: Frances Alford’s lifetime of creativity

By Meg Brazill Seated in her sunny living room, Frances Holliday Alford asks lots of questions before talking about herself and her work. When she does, it’s clear that making art and the process of finding a path to art making affect her deeply. She is inquisitive and insightful—and always on the lookout to extend her community. Piecing a Narrative Alford is an internationally known fiber artist who makes her home in Grafton, a few blocks from where she spent her childhood summers visiting her grandparents’ home. She has exhibited widely, including at the International Quilt Festival in Houston every year since 1999, and in Austin, Chicago, Grafton, and Long Beach. Internationally she has had quilt shows in in Lyon, France; The Hague, Netherlands; Costa Rica; and Kazakhstan. This year she will exhibit for the first time at the Festival of Quilts in England (the largest quilting festival in Europe) as well as for the first time at the Bojagi Forum in Suwon, South Korea. Describing Alford as a quilt artist might seem surprising given her broad range of interests, but consider the world of contemporary quilts, fiber arts, surface design, and the community of makers, and it’s possible to begin to understand the richness Alford finds in that world. That said, she doesn’t limit her investigations to quilting when inspiration arises. Vibrant colors and complex compositions supply drama for Alford’s often personal narratives, which she integrates into her textile masterworks. Alford has made small stitched items most of her life but she says it wasn’t until much later that she conceived of them as part of a larger whole—such as a quilt. At times she uses images that are similar to one another, such as houses from the same neighborhood, or remembrances of a trip she’s taken; other times the images are more disparate. Either way, unifying elements of color and texture render the work as a painterly, unified, cohesive composition. Quilts are her central work but Alford also creates sketches, collages, travel boxes, and postcard art. She collaborates on group projects and sometimes with just one other artist. Her work appeals on many levels, and the detail of her sewing, hand stitching, appliqué, collage, and other techniques enhance a narrative that is endlessly inventive. An Artist in the Making Alford is the third generation of her family in Grafton, but she was born in Texas in 1945 and grew up there. She studied fine arts in college but was concerned about making a living as an artist. “Some of us didn’t believe we could support ourselves as artists,” Alford says, identifying a challenge common to artists and,...

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Open Studios
Oct02

Open Studios

38th Annual Putney Craft Tour, Top Ten Vermont Winter Event Various locations around Putney http://www.putneycrafts.com Nov 25-27: Spend Thanksgiving weekend at our craft, culinary, and stage event, meandering our back roads, purchasing one-of-a-kind crafts, eating fabulous food, drinking local wine, and taking in a performance at two at our local theaters. For the third year running, the Putney Craft Tour is voted one of Vermont’s top 10 winter events. North Bennington Outdoor Sculpture Show Downtown Bennington http://www.betterbennington.com Thru Oct 23: Through the ages, classic sculpture, whether Greek or Roman marble or a Far East depiction of Buddha, tends to follow a visual aesthetic with which most lovers of art, as well as the lay public, are familiar. Enter sculpture with an edge to it and leave behind any notions gained from classic renditions of that medium. In North Bennington, artist Joe Chirchirillo conducts his annual labor of love: organizing and curating the 19th annual North Bennington Outdoor Sculpture Show. River Valley Artisan Tour Chesterfield, Spofford and Westmoreland, N.H. http://www.rivervalleyartisans.com Sept 10-11: Self-guided tour through the towns of Spofford, Chesterfield, and Westmoreland, N.H. Visiting artists in their own studios and in Fellowship Hall. Viewing reception Oct 9. For a map and more information, visit rivervalleyartisans.com. Bennington Quiltfest Mt. Anthony Union Middle School, Bennington http://www.benningtonquiltfest.com Sept 17-18: Show offers new quilts, demonstrations, queen-size quilt raffle, challenge quilts, special exhibits, many vendors, and mouthwatering fare from Quiltfest Cafe. Featured quilter and lecturer Joan Ford, of Hummingbird Highway and author of “Scrap Therapy” and “Scraps Plus One,” lectures at 1p both days. Consignment Boutique offers a large selection of sale items. Annual Vermont Fine Furniture Woodworking & Forest Festival Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock http://www.Vermontwood.com Sept 24-25: Enjoy furniture and wood product shopping at Billings Farm & Museum at this year’s event. Vermont woodworking vendors sell unique wood products such as carvings, home accessories, jewelry, bedroom and dining furniture, and toys and games. In the barns, see farm-work firsthand, including care of the Jersey herd, draft horses, sheep, oxen, and chickens. Explore the horse barn, calf nursery, milk room, and dairy barn and get comfortable with the farm’s livestock through interactive activities, programs, and events. Activities include wagon rides, horse logging, hands-on wood crafting, sawmill demos, forest walks, and many other educational programs. Weston Antiques Show Weston Playhouse, Weston http://www.westonantiquesshow.org Sept 30-Oct 1, 10a-5p; preview Sept 29, 7:30p: Featuring renowned dealers from across the United States with American and English furniture, accessories, Americana, folk art, silver, samplers, paintings, oriental rugs, jewelry, and more. Since the Weston Antiques Show’s inception, more than 85,000 attendees have enjoyed the show and over $1 million has been...

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Columbus Day
Oct02

Columbus Day

Honora Winery Grape Stomp Honora Winery, Jacksonville honoragrapestomp.com Oct 8: Bring the kids and enjoy the harvest feeling. Demonstrations and sales from local farmers, craft makers, artisans, and food vendors; banjo and washboard music; crisp fall air and amazing views of southern Vermont from the vineyards of Honora Winery. Sip wine created at our boutique right on the property. Live music both days. 12-5p. Stratton Columbus Day Weekend Stratton Resort stratton.com Oct 8-10: It’s the time of year when our beautiful Green Mountains transform into a symphony of fiery reds and vibrant orange and yellows. Take in the beauty from southern Vermont’s highest peak. Fill your Columbus Day weekend with games, live music, food, and friends at Stratton, which will be buzzing with plenty to do and see. Oktoberfest Mount Snow, West Dover mountsnow.com Oct 8-9: Like most German-themed Oktoberfest events, the 18th Annual Mount Snow Oktoberfest will have plenty of beer, schnitzel and Oom-pah music, but throw in kids’ games, pumpkin painting, an apple slingshot and our famous schnitzel toss and you’ve got two days of fun for the whole family. Heirloom Apple Tasting Day Scott Farm, Dummerston scottfarmvermont.com Oct 9: Each October during Columbus Day weekend we open our packing barn at Scott Farm for an heirloom apple tasting celebration. Orchard manager Ezekiel Goodband offers all a taste of a select group of apples while sharing apple lore: What was Thomas Jefferson’s favorite apple? Who was Mr. Greening and what was his claim to fame? Visit us on Apple Tasting Day and buy mixed bags of heirloom apples or many of a single kind for eating out of hand, sauces, pies, or tarte Tatin. 10a, 12p, 2p. —————————————- Dummerston Apple Pie Fest Dummerston Center Congregational Church Oct 9: For 40-plus years, the Dummerston Apple Pie Festival has been held each year on the Sunday of Columbus Day weekend, the peak of colorful autumn foliage in southern Vermont. A full 1,500 apple pies are made by many church members and friends and proudly served with Vermont cheese and hand-churned ice cream. A farmer’s breakfast, grilled lunch, tag sale, and craft fair make the festival a whole day event. Folks from all over the Northeast travel by motorcycle and automobile to take part in the...

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Pumpkin Fests
Oct02

Pumpkin Fests

32nd Townshend Pumpkin Festival Townshend, on the Common http://www.townshenvermont.org OCT 15: The Pumpkin Festival is a country fair with a craft show, pumpkin decorating contest, Halloween costume parade, best pumpkin pie contest, food vendors, and free pony rides for kids during Vermont’s foliage season. Buy pumpkin pie whole or by the piece. Manchester Pumpkin Festival Equinox Valley Nursery, Manchester http://www.visitmanchestervt.com OCT 15: This year’s festival includes perennial favorites wagon rides, crazy corn maze, bouncy house, kids’ crafts, pumpkin painting, scarecrow stuffing, cider donut eating contest, and other fun-filled activities. Highlights of the day include the costume parade and contest at 1p and the Witches of the Northshire, who will gather for a photo around the bubbling cauldron at 1:30p. Come in costume to join the...

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Festivals
Oct02

Festivals

Brattleboro Bacon Fest Fairgrounds in Guilford http://www.facebook.com/brattleborobaconfest Sept 17: Enjoy all things bacon! There will be bacon beer, samples from many different vendors, Brattleboro Baconfest, “Bacon, Blues, and Brews,” and brought to you by Classic Hits 92.7 WKVT and the Brattleboro Area Chamber of Commerce. 11a. River Valley Kids Fair Brattleboro Common http://www.windhamchildcare.org Sept 17: Family-fun events, entertainers, games, bouncy houses, face painting, and more. The professional children’s entertainment slate is set; one of the acts for this year’s circus-themed kids fair is “On Her Majesty’s Secret Circus.” It’s a circus act and comedy show—and altogether one of the hottest acts in the region. 11a-4p. Vermont Wine & Harvest Festival West Dover and Wilmington http://www.thevermontfestival.com Sept 17: With the event set against Vermont’s world-renowned fall foliage, festival-goers will discover, savor, and enjoy the wares of Vermont vintners, small specialty-food producers, chefs, painters, publishers, cheese makers, potters, jewelers, photographers, and farmers. 10a-5p. Chester Vermont Fall Festival on the Green Chester, on the Green http://www.chesterfallfestival.org Sept 17-18: At the peak of Vermont’s preeminent fall foliage, the charm and elegance of the Chester Village Green comes to life as it hosts the 40th Annual Fall Craft Festival. The Chester Annual Craft Fair celebrates Vermont’s gifted artisans, Chester’s unique history, Vermont’s matchless beauty and timeless, rural traditions. More than 70 artisans, craftspeople, and tantalizing food purveyors from across New England grace the Green with stories, skills, and exquisite wares. 10a-4p. Brattleboro Literary Festival Various locations in Brattleboro http://www.brattleboroliteraryfestival.org Oct 13-16: The Brattleboro Literary Festival takes over downtown Brattleboro with more than 70 authors in a series of provocative readings, panel discussions, and special events. Featured authors include Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Annette Gordon Reed; Arun Ghandi, grandson of Mahatma Ghandi; Pulitzer Prize-winning poets Yusef Komunyaaka and Jorie Graham; National Book Award fiction finalists David Means, Bonnie Jo Campbell and Dana Spiotta; NPR “Only a Game” host Bill Littlefield; National Book Critics Circle Award winner Charlotte Gordon; memoirist and fiction author Dani Shapiro; and “Sisters in Crime” author Hank Phillipi Ryan. Gordon Hayward will launch his new book about the Latchis Family on Sat at 10a. He’ll be signing books before and after his one-hour talk in the main theater of the Latchis. Enjoy Greek delicacies and coffee beginning at 9a. New England Center for Circus Arts Trapezium Celebration 10 Town Crier Dr., Brattleboro Sept 29: NECCA invites you to the groundbreaking celebration of its new Circus Arts Trapezium. Stop by for lively entertainment for the family, including flying, juggling, music, and food. Bring a shovel and help break ground with others in the community. 5p. 11th Annual ITV Fest Mount Snow, Dover http://www.itvfest.com Oct...

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Farmers’ markets
Oct02

Farmers’ markets

Saturdays Brattleboro Farmers’ Market Western Avenue (just west of Creamery Covered Bridge), Brattleboro 9a-2p, http://www.brattleborofarmersmarket.com Norwich Farmers’ Market Route 5 south in Norwich 9a-1p, http://www.morwichfarmersmarket.org Bennington Farmers’ Market Bennington Station, 10a-1p 802 442-8934 Londonderry-West River Farmers’ Market Routes 11 and 100, 9a-1p 802 824-4492 Rutland Downtown Farmers’ Market Depot Park, 9a-2p 802 747-4403 Springfield Community Market People’s Bank Parking Lot, 10a-1p http://www.springfieldonthemove.com Wilmington Farmers’ Market Main Street, Wilmington, 10a-3p 802 464-9069 Woodstock-Mt. Tom Farmers’ Market Mt. Tom parking lot, 9:30a-12:30p http://www.mttomfarmersmarket.com Sundays Jamaica Farmers’ Market Main Street, Jamaica, 10a-2p, jamaicavt.com 802 874-4151 Chester Farmers’ Market Zachary’s Pizza House, 11a-2p 802 875-2703 Dorset Farmers’ Market H.N. Williams Store, 10a-2p 802 558-8511 Putney Farmers’ Market Putney Co-op, 10a-2p http://www.putneyfarmersmarket.com Stowe Farmers’ Market Intersection of routes 100 and 108, Stowe, 10:30a-3p http://www.stowefarmersmarket.com Windsor Farmers’ Market On the Green (State Street), 11:30a-2:30p http://www.windsorfarmersmarket.blogspot.com Tuesdays Bennington Farmers’ Market Bennington Station, 10a-1p 802 442-8934 Brattleboro Farmers’ Market Flat Street, near downtown, 4-7p http://www.brattleborofarmersmarket.com Wednesdays Rutland Downtown Farmers’ Market Depot Park, 2-6p http://www.rutlanddowntown.com Woodstock Farmers’ Market On the Green, 3-6p http://www.woodstockvt.com Thursdays Manchester Farmers’ Market Adams Park, Manchester, 3-6p http://www.manchestermarket.org Castleton Village Farmers’ Market Main Street, Castleton, 3:30-6p 802 273-2241 Royalton Farmers’ Market South Royalton Town Green, 3-6:30p 802 763-6630 Fridays Bellows Falls Farmers’ Market Waypoint Center, 4-7p http://www.bffarmersmarket.com Brandon Farmers’ Market Central Park, Brandon, 9a-2p 802 247-8473 Fair Haven Farmers’ Market The Park, 3-6p 802 265-4240 Ludlow Farmers’ Market Main Street, 4-7p 802 734-3829 Hartland Farmers’ Market Hartland Town Library, 4-7p 802 296-2032 West Townshend Farmers’ Market West Townshend Country Store, 4-7p http://www.nofavt.org For more information about Farmers’ Markets in Southern Vermont, including a full schedule of market days/hours, visit nofavt.org. Most Farmers’ Markets in Vermont close by the end of...

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Spotlight: Southern Vermont Arts Center
Oct02

Spotlight: Southern Vermont Arts Center

Southern Vermont Arts Center 930 SVAC Dr., Manchester 802-362-1405 Tues-Sat 10a-5p, Sun 12p-5p http://www.swac.org Under the leadership of Hadrien Redouin, the new Gallery Manager at the Southern Vermont Arts Center in Manchester, the galleries and museum-size exhibition spaces has become southwestern Vermont’s newest destination for both cutting-edge and more traditional contemporary art. The Wilson Museum and Galleries currently features a twenty-year retrospective of David Brewster’s dynamic landscapes, is up until Oct. 3. Yester House, a collection of eleven galleries, houses individual artists’ solo shows. Opening Oct. 9, and going until Dec. 3, will be a joint show in one of the large galleries of Wilson: paintings by Terry Hauptman and sculpture by Hugh Joudry. Characterized as “outsider art” by some (such as Raw Vision magazine), Hauptman shows wall-spanning “scrolls” that are homages to the dancing, elliptical spirit of her Hebraic heritage. Hauptman’s scrolls are also inspired by, and evocative of, ancient Celtic, Mesopotamian and Native American iconography. Hugh Joudry’s wood sculptures, carved over the past four decades in the forest setting of his studio in Wardsboro, Vermont, from native Vermont wood, are redolent of African, primitive carved objects, full of numinous mystical references, and are at the same time sophisticated forms. Both artists have known each other for decades and been inspired by one another’s work. During this same period, in Wilson House, will be Robert Van Degna’s “King Biscuit Festival,” Photography about the oldest Blues festival; and Scott J Morgan’s sculptures, guitars refurbished to art. A themed exhibit — “Pick your Color” — runs thru Oct. 16. Work for this exhibit was gathered from a national call. From Oct. 22 to Dec. 11, 11 winter solo shows take place in the Yester House galleries. The Winter Member Show runs Dec. 17 to Feb....

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At the galleries
Oct02

At the galleries

Chaffee Art Center 16 South Main St., Rutland http://www.chaffeeartcenter.org, 802 775-0356 Oct 1-Nov 6: Politics: Political Cartoons and College Art. Featuring historical political cartoons from Jon Stewart’s collection and new cartoons by current artists. Nov 9-Dec 9: Surface Expressions. Featuring the fiber arts of Surface Design Association members. Nov 12-13: Rutland Garden Club presents a Standard Flower Show: Inspirations, 12-5p, Sun 10a-4p. Opening Dec 14: Celebration: 2016/2017 All-Member Exhibit. Crowell Gallery at Moore Free Library 23 West St., Newfane http://www.moorefreelibrary.wordpress.com, 802 365-7948 Sept 1-29: Susan Wilson and Anna Koloseike, works in clay. Oct 1-29: Richard Bergeron, landscapes in oil and pastel. Nov 1-30: Saxtons River Art Guild show. Opening reception Nov 5, 1-3p. Gallery in the Woods 145 Main St, Brattleboro Open daily 11a-5:30p, Sun 12-5p http://www.galleryinthewoods.com, 802 257-4777 Now showing: Trained as a printmaker, Ayn Hanna creates richly drawn active surfaces, exploring drawing and mark-making, connecting the physical and spiritual. Her textile paintings include layers of fabric combined with thread “drawing” to develop texture and line. Now showing: Tribal art collected from the studios of Mexico’s internationally collected master craftsmen and -women. Gallery Northstar 151 Townshend Road, Grafton 10a-5p daily (Tuesday by chance) http://www.gnsgrafton.com, 802 843-2465 Oct 1-31: James Urbaska Solo Show. Great Hall 100 River St., Springfield, VT http://www.facebook.com/GreatHallSpringfield 802 885-3061, 802 258-3992, Mon-Fri 9a-5p Oct 14-April 21: Signs of Life with Roger Sandes and Mary Welsh. Opening reception Fri, Oct 14, 5p. The exhibition features the works of husband and wife team Roger Sandes and Mary Welsh. Welsh’s collages are made of found materials from art magazines, art books, calendars, and end papers, which are glued with acid-free acrylic medium on birch or mahogany plywood panels that have been prepared with acrylic gesso. “My collages are depictions of what we all take for granted: houses, rooms and their contents. Viewing these scenes evokes memories and fantasies,” she says. Sandes’s paintings look like silk and feel like eggshell. “My glazes and washes are highly translucent. Light can pass through the pigment and bounce off of the white ground. That way the colors can glow,” he notes. Hall Art Foundation Reading 551 VT Route 106 802 952-1056, http://www.vermont@hallfoundation.org Thru Nov. Sat, Sun, Wed by appointment. Curated by American artist Joel Sternfeld, works from more than 50 artists are represented in Landscapes after Ruskin: Redefining the Sublime, which includes paintings, photographs, sculptures, and the world debut of Sternfeld’s video work, London Bridge (2016). In a world overwhelmed by human industry and development, Sternfeld demonstrates how contemporary artists can discover new beauties associated with nature, and in so doing, can invoke a new sense of the sublime. Appointments are available...

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