A little help from their friends: Putney celebrates Next Stage Arts Project
Jun15

A little help from their friends: Putney celebrates Next Stage Arts Project

By Elaine Clift In 2010, when a few people gathered to contemplate starting a performance center in the village of Putney, they could not have imagined where their creative efforts would find them six years later. Today, the result of their energy and artistic vision is Next Stage Arts Project, a beloved part of the Putney community and a model for community-based theater. The idea for Next Stage Arts Project (NSAP) is rooted in another important community project: the reconstruction of the Putney General Store by the Putney Historical Society in 2008 after the 200-year-old store burned down. Eighteen months later, the renovated landmark suffered an arsonist’s fire that destroyed the renovated market. Devastated by the fires, along with a growing economic recession, the village found itself with vacant storefronts, a newly vacated church that dated back to 1841 and was on the National Register of Historic Places, and a threatened village economy. Facing a troubling future, the Putney Historical Society and Putney’s Sandglass Theater gathered community members at the empty church on Kimball Hill to explore how the village might move forward. Out of that gathering came the resolve to rebuild the store yet again. It was also the genesis for NSAP. When the group of NSAP founders and representatives from the Historical Society met in 2010, they recognized the beauty of the church space, but also spoke to its limitations. So, rather than plunge into fundraising for renovations, they decided to begin programming in order to assess how the space worked as a performance venue—and to sense how much community support there would be for extensive renovation. A feasibility study that year revealed a significant problems: The old church was not handicapped accessible, it was not heat efficient, and its wiring was inadequate. It also had 100-year-old horsehair pew cushions for seats. The first objective NSAP’s leaders met was securing funds for new, more comfortable pew cushions. The team raised the funds, although at that time the seating still did not address sightlines. (Theater seating allows for unobstructed views by gradually raising the level of seating.) Then they began addressing other problems: the lack of restrooms, a poor lobby space, and peeling lead ceiling paint. According to NSAP Executive Director Maria Basescu, the ceiling was the group’s greatest technical challenge. “It was also one of the most expensive parts of renovation because removing peeling lead paint is a very complicated process and requires qualified, approved vendors and permits. We also wanted to be mindful of historic preservation and the details that existed in the beautifully crafted ceiling,” she explains. Other aspects of the renovation were challenging as...

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Three intimate farm to table chef-owned restaurants that get it right
Jun15

Three intimate farm to table chef-owned restaurants that get it right

Chef-owned T.J. Buckley’s: Eight tables, dinner only, and amazing The movement that would sweep the world didn’t yet exist when Chef Michael Fuller went into business 34 years ago, but even then he was running his restaurant and living his life according to its main tenet: local is king. Fuller opened T.J. Buckley’s in a restored 1925 Worcester dining car that had housed a so-called greasy spoon eatery. “We served breakfast and brunch. It was a small place with a limited menu and a lot of attention was given to detail,” Fuller recalls of the restaurant’s early days. A few years later, he decided to serve dinner only and focus on an ingredient-driven menu. The evolution of serving local produce and products started immediately, he says. “It was before farm-to-table was a thing. I know all the area produce growers within a 15-mile radius, some for more than 30 years.” These days, the intimate eight-table Elliot Street restaurant, which features an open kitchen and vintage decor, is listed as one of two reasons Brattleboro enjoys its standing among Fodor’s and Frommer’s Top 10 Best Small Towns in America and best restaurant rankings in America, respectively. Fuller has lived the farm-to-table lifestyle since he was 19 years old in the mid-’70s. He lived in a collective household and helped care for communal organic gardens. There were many communes in the area then, Fuller recalls. By the time he had the opportunity to apprentice for Rene Chardain, then owner of Four Columns Inn and Restaurant in Newfane, he was comfortable working with these ingredients. Four Columns was the first true farm-to-table restaurant, preceding Alice Waters’s Chez Panisse, in Berkeley, Calif., by four years. “Rene was an old-world French chef who ran the Four Columns like a country inn,” Fuller explains. “The menu was very seasonal, and the restaurant closed during the off-season.” He adds of Chardain, whose property boasted a trout pond and visiting birds, “he had a patch of wild watercress I used to pick from, and I’d collect chanterelle mushrooms. It introduced me to foraging.” Fuller’s French culinary training is evident in that he cooks simple, elegant food with clean flavors. A vegetarian along with his wife and children, he has perfected the art of—and often builds his menu around—what he collects in the wild during his mountain biking excursions. His skills were featured in a recent episode of “Filthy Riches,” a National Geographic series that focuses on foraged and wild foods and the chefs who integrate them into their cuisine. Fuller’s favorite wild edibles include ramps (wild leeks, which he either candies or pickles), and morel, chanterelle, hedgehog,...

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Talk of the Arts: Together is how the arts will survive
Jun15

Talk of the Arts: Together is how the arts will survive

By Kevin F. F. Quigley and Sara Coffey Sadly, the arts and cultural sectors are no strangers to budget cuts. They’ve endured a number of Republican-led efforts to reduce arts funding since the 1990s, and, in keeping with this tradition, President Trump’s budget blueprint, released in March, proposes significant cuts to virtually every agency except the departments of defense, homeland security, and veterans affairs. It also would eliminate funding for the National Endowment of the Arts in FY18. In the face of these drastic cuts, a real solution to supporting artists and keeping the arts vital in our communities is to develop new models of partnership that link higher education, artist residencies, and communities. Vermont Performance Lab (VPL) is a nonprofit arts organization that supports the arts and Vermont’s rural communities through artist residencies linking artists’ creative research and community engagement. Through a decade-long partnership, Marlboro College and VPL have been evolving a new model of partnership that links artist research with undergraduate faculty and students, and with members of our rural communities. A recent project explored the radical movements of the late 20th century. An undergraduate course involving Green Mountain Crossroads, a local LGBTQ organization, was co-imagined by theater artist Ain Gordon, American Studies faculty member Kate Ratcliff, and Theater faculty member Brenda Foley. This innovative model of partnership allows faculty and students to get out of the studio or classroom and into our communities for work that tackles important social issues and collaborative research. Our work together has involved workshops and community forums, and our artist residencies have culminated in published papers, a community oral history project, and student exhibitions and performances, as well as professionally produced works of theater and dance. Most importantly, this work goes beyond traditional master classes and performances to engage participants in the local community. Our collaborative model of socially engaged practice nurtures stronger, healthier communities while fostering an informed, engaged generation of cultural workers and producing great works of art. Partnering in this way also helps precious resources go further and enhances our institutions by offering students access to influential artists and community organizations working on a range of topics in ways that enhance their learning and preparation for the future. While funding for the arts is sometimes seen as frivolous, and only to be supported when financial times are great, this is shortsighted considering that the arts strengthen the economy. For example, with only a $148 million annual budget, NEA investments in the arts help contribute to a $730 billion arts and culture economic industry—including 4.2 percent of the annual GDP and 4.8 million jobs that yield a $26 billion...

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At the museums
Jun14

At the museums

Bennington Center for the Arts 44 Gypsy Lane, Bennington 10a to 5p, Tue-Sun (Closed Mon) http://www.thebennington.org, 802 442-7158 Thru Dec 23: Small Works Show. Every year our Small Works Show greets our visitors with beautiful work in a broad variety of subjects but a size limitation of 14 inches. June 3-July 9: Black & White. There is nowhere to hide in black and white work. Whether in charcoal, ink, oil, or even wire, technique and subject matter take center stage. June 10-July 22: Wildscapes. We are excited to again exhibit a show that portrays the passion for our natural world. Whether these paintings, drawings, or sculptures focus on wildlife or depict the beauty, chaos, or serenity of the wild places on Earth, we expect the show that David Rankin curates to be outstanding and thought-provoking. July 15-Sept 4: American Artists Abroad. This show is composed of fine art created by American artists inspired by travels abroad. July 29-Sept 17: Laumeister Fine Art Competition. Our annual competition this year is juried by Calvin Liang, a highly respected member of Oil Painters of America and the California Art Club. Ongoing: Permanent collection of wildlife and Native American artwork. Bennington Museum 75 Main St, Route 9, Bennington 10a to 5p (Closed Wed) http://www.benningtonmuseum.org, 802 477-1571 Thru June 18: Gatherum of Quiddities: Paintings by Pat Adams. With abstract paintings characterized by seductive colors and richly encrusted surfaces, Pat seeks to bring from her “gatherum of quiddities”—that stew of unnamed qualities—a visual situation that bestirs contemplation. Thru Dec 30: Buy Local: Photographs from the Weichert-Isselhardt Collection. Bennington was changing rapidly at the turn of the 19th century and local photographers captured the people and landscape using negatives on thin plates of glass. The Bennington Museum has acquired nearly 2,000 glass plate negatives from this era that were held in the Weichert-Isselhardt Collection and is pleased to have a selection of them dealing with local commerce and manufacturing on view. July 1-Nov 5: Grandma Moses: American Modern. A long overdue exhibition reexamining the beloved American artist Anna Mary Robertson “Grandma” Moses and reestablishing her to her rightful place within the canon of mid-century American Modern Art. Sept 2-Oct 9: 1863 Jane Stickle Quilt on display. Upcoming: Vermont Life Gallery, Breaking Down Barriers. Ongoing: Regional Artists Exhibits. Every 12 weeks throughout the year, different regional artists have their work displayed in the museum’s Regional Artists Gallery. On view for 11 weeks, the exhibits are selected by a jury twice a year and include a mix of paintings, sculpture, photographs, wood works, and more. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center 10 Vernon St., Brattleboro 11a to 5p (Closed...

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At the galleries
Jun14

At the galleries

Castleton Downtown Gallery Center Street Alley, Rutland http://www.castleton.edu/arts, 802 282-2396 Thru June 24: Notes From Underground: Elizabeth Michelman. Michelman’s artistic musings guide us through experiences of language-as-form, form-as-language, the poetry of video and music, and the politics of making art. July 1-Aug 12: Moments of Movement: Christine Holzschuh. Capturing the human figure in movement and candid moments of interaction is a focus of Holzchuh’s small paintings. Opening reception July 14, 6p. Aug 19-Sept 30: Persi Narvaez. A collection of vibrant paintings by Persi Narvaez to be shown at the Castleton Downtown Gallery. Opening reception Sept 1, 6p. Chaffee Art Center 16 South Main St., Rutland http://www.chaffeeartcenter.org, 802 775-0356 Aug 12-13: Art in the Park. The Chaffee Art Center is pleased to host its 56th Annual Art in the Park Fine Art & Craft Festivals, featuring a variety of fine artisans and crafters. The Castleton University Bank Gallery 104 Merchants Row, Rutland http://www.castleton.edu/arts, 802 282-2396 Thru June: The She Project, Part I, with Kristen M. Watson and Mary Admasian. With a nod to the tradition of femmage, art constructed of found and saved objects that express a female narrative, the artists use mirrors, cosmetics, beautification products, and natural elements to address themes around self confidence, worth, and age-related sexual power. Christine Price Gallery Fine Arts Center, Castleton University 45 Alumni Dr., Castleton http://www.castleton.edu/arts Aug 28-Sept 29: Ruth Hamilton: A collection of new work. Crowell Gallery At Moore Free Library, Newfane http://www.moorefreelibrary.com, 802 365-7948 June: Philip Foster, ink on paper. July: Karma Kitaj & Sharon Myers, mixed media. August: Gerarde Doucette, watercolor. September: Kathie Gatto-Gurney, sculpture. Cynthia-Reeves New England PO Box 788, Walpole, N.H. 03601 http://www.cynthia-reeves.com, 802 579-1029 June 10-July 22: Beth Ganz: Atlas Project. Featuring new works by Beth Ganz and sculpture by Willard Boepple. Gallery 2 and Vermont Artisan Designs 106 Main St., Brattleboro Mon-Sat 10a-7p; Sun 11a-4p http://www.vtart.com, 802 257-7044 Thru May: The Art of Paul D. Ortlip, the youngest of the seven offspring of renowned artists H. Willard Ortlip and Aimee Eschner Ortlip. He found art to be his life’s calling. Growing up with a paintbrush in hand, Paul trained with his parents in their fabled studio high above the Hudson River and Edgewater, on the cliffs of Fort Lee, New Jersey. Gallery at the VAULT 68 Main St., Springfield http://www.galleryvault.org, 802 885-7111 June 10-11: Photographic Composition with Stephen Whitaker. June 26-29: Smoke-Fired Garden Sculptures and Animal Forms with Susan Raber Bray. Gallery in the Woods 145 Main St., Brattleboro Open daily 11a-5:30p, 12-5p Sun http://www.galleryinthewoods.com, 802 257-4777 Ongoing: Gallery 1: Richard Heller, New Paintings in Oil. Gallery 2: Dante Corsano, New Furniture. Gallery 3: Tribal Art...

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Music festivals
Jun14

Music festivals

7th Frendly Gathering Music Festival Mt. Ellen – Sugarbush Resort, Waitsfield http://www.frendlygathering.com June 29-July 1: For three days at the end of June, we invite you to join us for music, camping, inspiration, and a big dose of friendship at the Frendly Gathering. This year’s music lineup includes Twiddle, Yonder Mountain String Band, Turkuaz, Charles Bradley and His Extraordinaires, and many more. Tucked into the Green Mountains of Southern Vermont, we discovered Timber Ridge, an old ski resort with lots of character, which has become home to our festival and an incredible community of people. As native Vermonters, we really feel like we get to open up our backyard to Frends from around the world. At the Frendly Gathering you can expect an intimate experience, short lines, and lots of smiling faces. All year long we put together music, workshops, and activities that will bring you closer to the Frends you love—and introduce you to ones you’ve yet to meet. 18th Annual Roots on the River Bellows Falls http://www.vermontfestivalsllc.com June 9-11: Vermont Festivals is proud to present Roots on the River 2017, with performances by more than 15 of the best singer-songwriters around, including Bill Kirchen, Hayes Carll, and Mary Gauthier. Three days of world-class singer-songwriters in intimate venues. Always free parking, delicious vendor offerings for food and drink, youth tent, pet-friendly. Single event, full weekend, and deluxe packages available. Manchester Music Festival 42nd season Southern Vermont Arts Center, Manchester http://www.mmfvt.org Professional musicians from New York City and beyond gather each summer in Manchester, drawn by the opportunity not only to perform but also to teach and play with the young artists. MMF’s focus on superb music education and performance within this collegial atmosphere in the bucolic Green Mountains of Vermont remains one of the program’s strongest attractions. June 30: Season Prelude Party, 5:30p. July 6: Beethoven, Mozart & Strauss, 8p. July 9: Young Artists Concert, 2p. July 13: Schubert, Beethoven, Messiaen & Brahms, 6p. July 16: Young Artist Concert, 2p. July 20: Lieberman, Arensky, Sollima, Dvořák, 8p. July 23: Young Artists Concert, 2p. July 27: Chausson, Franck, Schubert, 2p. July 30: Young Artists Concert, 2p. Aug 3: An Orchestral Experience, 8p. Aug 6: Family Concert and Ice Cream Social, 2p. Aug 10: Glière, Renié, Rachmaninoff, Bach, Mendelssohn, 8p. Aug 13: Young Artists Concert, 2p. Aug 17: A Night at the Opera, 8p. Marlboro Music 67th season http://www.marlboromusic.org After three weeks of daily rehearsals, Marlboro artists begin sharing with audiences the results of their in-depth collaborations. Public concerts are presented on Saturday evenings and Sunday afternoons from July 15-Aug 13 and on Friday evenings July 28-Aug 11. The programs...

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Summer festivals
Jun14

Summer festivals

Manchester Antique and Classic Car Show June 6-7 Dorr Farm Field, Route 30, Manchester http://www.manchestercarshow.com, 802 362-6313 The premier Antique and Classic Car Show in Manchester celebrates 29 years of the best antique and classic cars, food vendors, and flea market in the Northeast. First- and second-place winners, special awards, and first place in the “best of” categories awarded. Tailgate competition takes place and is judged on Sunday, as is the judging for “best of” the 1940s through the ’80s. CineSLAM, Vermont Pride Film Festival June 17, 5p http://www.cineslam.com Latchis Theater, Brattleboro This film festival of shorts, which takes place during June Pride, brings together films from across the country and around the world. It allows us an intriguing glimpse of the diversity of life, struggles, and triumphs of LGBTQ people and their allies in short narrative, documentary, and art video formats. Programmed by Guilford, Vt., resident and Emmy Award-winning filmmaker John Scagliotti, who created the first LGBTQ television series, PBS’s In the Life. Attendees of the CineSLAM Film Festival must be 18 or older. Be advised that while CineSLAM does not accept pornographic films, some submissions may contain adult situations and nudity, so please do not bring minors. Old-fashioned Strawberry Supper June 24 Evening Star Grange Hall, Dummerston Center http://www.dummerston-church.org Old-fashioned Strawberry Supper at the Dummerston Congregational Church runs Sat, June 24. Wardsboro Fourth of July Street Parade July 4 http://www.4thofjulywardsboro.com The 68th Annual Wardsboro Street Fair and Parade is Vermont’s longest running Fourth of July fair. More than 50 crafters and vendors will line Main Street; see an eclectic, one-of-a-kind parade; enjoy plenty of food, including strawberry shortcake, homemade pies, chicken BBQ, hamburgers, hot dogs, and pulled pork sandwiches. Also on tap: quilt show, book sale, children’s games, art show, and entertainment. Vermont Summer Festival Horse Show July 4-Aug 13 Beebe Farm, Route 7A, East Dorset, Vt. http://www.vt-summerfestival.com Northern New England’s largest AA-rated hunter and jumper show. Top riders throughout the United States and Canada compete for prizes and points toward national recognition. The six-week Vermont Summer Festival, marking the event’s 24th consecutive season of competitive and spectator-friendly hunter, jumper, and equitation competition at Harold Beebe Farm. See our events page for details. Southern Vermont Dance Festival July 13-16 Brattleboro http://www.southernvermontdancefestival.com (tickets) The Southern Vermont Dance Festival returns with an exciting round of dance classes, lectures, and performances. Attend dance performances each evening and your choice of classes each day. There will be many amazing opportunities offered to the professional dancer, dance student, and dance enthusiast. This festival weekend will be filled with incredible raffle events, downtown performances and workshops, and live music and performances hosted by...

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Summer stage
Jun14

Summer stage

Great River Theater Festival Runs July 6-9 at multiple locations in Putney Tickets for individual shows, and subscription tickets for the series, will be available at http://www.mainstreetarts.org and through select resellers. Information: Main Street Arts, 802 869-2960; mainstreetarts.org The First Annual Great River Theater Festival promises a “Who’s Who” of community and professional theater companies. Audiences will enjoy a mix of comedy, drama, and musicals in four venues by seven regional community and professional theater companies. Joining festival coordinator Main Street Arts July 6-9 in Putney are Weston Playhouse Theatre Company, Vermont Theatre Company, Putney’s Apron Theater Company, Brattleboro’s New England Youth Theatre, Actors Theatre Playhouse of West Chesterfield, N.H., and Sandglass Puppet Theater. Among the shows planned for the festival are family favorites such as the Carole King/Maurice Sendak musical “Really Rosie,” to be produced by Weston; Main Street Arts’ presentation of the multiple-award-winning musical comedy “Little Shop of Horrors”; Apron’s contribution of the Bertolt Brecht classic “Mother Courage and Her Children,” a work that has been characterized as the best play of the past hundred years; and, to give audiences a chance to compare classics, Vermont Theatre Company’s performance of Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” (outdoors, of course). The festival doesn’t stop there: New England Youth Theatre offers “The Emperor’s New Clothes”; Sandglass is reviving its wonderful original piece, “When I Put On My Glove”; and Actors Theatre Playhouse is delivering three 10-minute plays: “Songs My Brother Sang,” “Raghead,” and “It’s the Jews.” According to MSA Co-Chair Gina Cote, the festival, Main Street Arts’ most ambitious creative undertaking yet, fits in with even more treats MSA has in store for us as it works to promote the performing arts in Southern Vermont. In the meantime, audiences can catch a sneak peek of “Little Shop” at MSA’s theater in Saxtons River June 30-July 2, a week before the festival opens. Actors Theatre Playhouse Brook and Main streets, West Chesterfield, N.H. http://www.atplayhouse.org, 877 666-1855 June 8-24: Ten-Minute Play Festival, 7:30p, on Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays. If variety is the spice of life, then ATP has the ticket for you. And in just 10 minutes anything can happen, and usually does. July 8 & 15: Saturday staged reading of a dramatic comedy, Will Eno’s “The Realistic Joneses.” At 7:30p. A funny, moving story of neighbors who share their last name, and a not entirely casual backyard conversation. July 28-Aug 19: Alan Ayckbourn’s delightful comedy “Table Manners,” on Fridays and Saturdays, 7:30p. “Table Manners” is a genuine excuse to laugh, as one critic put it. “Six characters, hilariously unaware of their own flaws, represent two marriages grown stale and one courtship...

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Food festivals
Jun14

Food festivals

Grafton Food Festival http://www.graftonfoodfestival.com/ July 8: The Fifth Annual Grafton Food Festival is a food-lover’s event celebrating local food and farms in Southern Vermont. We celebrate our local “taste of place” by featuring local food and beverage vendors with tastings, cooking demonstrations, and farmers’ market tables. This year, celebrity chef and cookbook author Sara Moulton joins the festivities as guest chef. Stay in the heart of the Grafton Food Festival scene and enjoy special perks. This weekend is a foodie delight, with food and drink tastings, farmers’ market, live music, and cooking demonstrations. Vermont Cheesemakers Festival Coach Barn of Shelburne Farms, Shelburne http://www.vtcheesefest.com, 212 576-2700 July 16: Vermont is the premium artisanal cheese state, with the greatest number of cheesemakers per capita—more than 50! We invite you to experience our passion for making fine cheeses, taste local and fresh foods and wines, and meet the artisans who make them. Spend a high summer day along the shores of Lake Champlain at the historic Shelburne Farms Coach Barn for sampling, buying, learning, and networking. Hosted by the Vermont Butter & Cheese Company and the Vermont Cheese Council, the Festival takes place at Shelburne Farms from 10a-4p. The event, which is open to the public, attracted more than 1,100 visitors from across the country last year. This year’s attendees will sample more than 100 types of cheese from 50 cheesemakers, a variety of locally produced wines and beers, and several other artisanal foods, including maple syrup, honey, chocolates, and baked goods. Deerfield Valley Blueberry Festival and Parade – Top-Ten Summer Event Venues in the Mount Snow Valley http://www.vermontblueberry.com July 28-Aug 6: Berries, vintage cars, music, and food. If it’s blue, it’s probably happening in the Southern Vermont Deerfield Valley area towns of Wilmington, Whitingham, and Dover in late July and early August. Visitors to the Valley will find a big blue parade, a blue street fair, children’s activities, jam making, blueberry-themed specials at local eateries, blue music events, a blue car auto show, blueberry bake sales, blue beer, and pick your own blueberry opportunities. Don’t miss Boyd Farm’s “Fields of Blue” public art display. Inspired by Christo and Jean-Claude’s Central Park orange canvas display “The Gates,” Vermont farmers Janet and Buck Boyd’s display of blue tarps in their fields will have you...

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Farmers’ markets
Jun14

Farmers’ markets

Tuesdays Rutland Downtown Farmers’ Market Depot Park, 3-6p http://www.rcfmvt.org Bennington Walloomsac Farmers’ Market Bennington Station, 10a-1p http://www.facebook.com/BenningtonFarmersMarket, 802 442-8934 Wednesdays Brattleboro Area Farmers’ Market Brattleboro Food Co-op Parking Lot, 10a-2p http://www.brattleborofarmersmarket.com Woodstock Market on the Green 3-6p http://www.woodstockvt.com Thursdays Manchester Farmers’ Market Adams Park, 3-6p http://www.manchestermarket.org Poultney Farmers’ Market Main Street, 9a-2p http://www.poultneyvt.com, 802 287-2460 Royalton Farmers’ Market South Royalton Town Green, 3-6:30p http://www.facebook.com/Royaltonfarmersmarket, 802 763-6630 Fridays Bellows Falls Farmers Market Waypoint Center, 4-7p http://www.bffarmersmarket.com Brandon Farmers’ Market Central Park, Brandon, 9a-2p http://www.randon.org/businesses/brandon-farmers-market, 802 247-8473 Fairhaven Farmers’ Market The Park, 3-7p http://www.bellinghamfarmers.org/fairhaven-market, 802 265-4240 Ludlow Farmers’ Market Okemo Mountain School, 53 Main St., 4-7p http://www.ludlowfarmersmarket.org, 802 734-3829 Hartland Farmers’ Market Hartland Town Library, 4-7p http://www.hartlandfarmersmarket.blogspot.com, 802 296-2032 Townshend Farmers’ Market West Townshend Country Store, 4-7p http://www.westtownshend.wixsite.com/wrcp, 802 869-2141 Saturdays Brattleboro Area Farmers’ Market Western Avenue (just west of Creamery Covered Bridge) Brattleboro, 9a-2p http://www.brattleborofarmersmarket.org Norwich Farmers’ Market Route 5 south in Norwich, 9a- 1p http://www.norwichfarmersmarket.org Bennington Walloomsac Farmers’ Market Bennington Station, 10a-1p http://www.benningtonfarmersmarket.org, 802 442-8934 Londonderry—West River Farmers’ Market At routes 11 and 100, 9a-1p http://www.westriverfarmersmarket.com, 802 824-4492 Rutland Downtown Farmers’ Market Depot Park, 9a-2p 802 747-4403 Woodstock—Mt. Tom Farmers’ Market Mt. Tom Parking Lot, 9:30a-12:30p 802 457-1980 Springfield Community Market People’s United Bank, 10a-1p http://www.springfieldcommunitymarket.com, 802 546-1035 Sundays Dorset Farmers’ Market HN Williams Store, 10a-2p 802 558-8511 Jamaica Farmers’ Market Main Street, Jamaica, 10a-2p http://www.jamaicavt.com, 802 874-4151 Putney Farmers’ Market Across from Putney Co-op, 11a-2p http://www.putneyfarmersmarket.org. Windsor Farmers’ Market State Street Green, Windsor, 11:30a-2p...

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Grandma Moses: American Modern
Jun14

Grandma Moses: American Modern

Would you ever associate Grandma Moses with Modernism? The same people who embraced Modernism in America in the 1930s and ’40s were also collecting folk art. It was at this time that curators and collectors began to make connections between what they called the “American Primitives” and the most advanced contemporary art. In fact, the first public exhibition of Grandma Moses’s paintings was held at the Museum of Modern Art in 1939, and was organized by Sidney Janis, who later became famous as the gallerist who represented Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art. Bennington Museum is home to the largest public collection of paintings by Anna Mary Robertson Moses (1860-1961). Better known as Grandma Moses, the artist was catapulted to international fame during the ’40s as the result of her charming, naïvely executed paintings of rural American farm life. But she was so much more than a homespun folk hero. The popular view is that she simply painted scenes remembered from her childhood. In fact, she was a highly skilled artist who refined her art through practice and created a unique world of her own imagining. She combined multiple perspectives in the same painting and used collage and popular imagery, unconsciously paralleling the techniques of Cubism, Surrealism, and Pop Art. Grandma Moses: American Modern, on view at the Bennington Museum, its final venue, July 1 through November 5, has a subversive goal, for it will upset your expectations and get you to look at this beloved American artist with fresh eyes. It is a long-overdue exhibition that will reestablish her place in the mid-century art world that was embracing modern art at the same time. By putting her paintings side by side with works by such iconic Modernists as Fernand Léger, Joseph Cornell, Helen Frankenthaler, and Andy Warhol, and folk artists such as Edward Hicks and Joseph Pickett, the exhibition will allow visitors to discover for themselves how all these artists drew on found images, color, collage, memory, and their own innate artistic sensibility to create original masterpieces. Like any trained artist, Moses used thought, planning, and intuition to create works of enormous vitality and imagination. The exhibition is organized by Shelburne Museum and Bennington Museum, and combines their two great collections of the painter’s work, supplemented with key loans from private collections arranged by Galerie St. Etienne of New York City. Bennington Museum augments this exhibition with over 20 additional masterpieces on loan from public and private collections on view in the museum’s permanent Grandma Moses Gallery. The result: an almost unprecedented opportunity to see more than 60 works by this colorful American painter throughout three galleries, the largest...

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Garden events
Jun14

Garden events

Boyd Family Farm 125 E. Dover Road, Wilmington http://www.boydfamilyfarm.com, 802 464-5618 The Boyd Family Farm, in the Deerfield Valley just minutes from Wilmington Center, is a gorgeous summer destination. Pick your own flowers and blueberries here and find an extensive array of annuals and perennials. Many workshops are offered, such as “Hanging Basket and Planter Workshop” and “Fruit Trees and Berry Bushes for Fathers.” The Gardens of Westminster Westminster http://www.westminstercares.org July 22-23: See the gardens of Mary and Gordon Hayward, nationally known garden designers, writers, and lecturers, in their July glory. Five more fabulous gardens are on the tour as well: those of Fran Renaud, Cyndy Fine, Ann Kebbell, and Kathy Leo, and the Westminster Center School Garden (Saturday only). Buy food and enjoy music at the Haywards’ garden and make a day of it. Assorted specialty sandwiches, summer slaw, watermelon slices, raspberry oat bars, ginger almond cookies, fresh lemonade, and ginger mint iced tea. Sponsored by Westminster Cares. Rain or shine. Admission is $15, or two passes for $25. (Discounted tickets online.) Hildene 1005 Hildene Road, Manchester http://www.hildene.org, 802 362-1788 May 21-June 11: Celebration of Peonies. Traditionally the last two weeks of May and the first two weeks of June, when the Formal Garden signals the beginning of the season with thousands of peony blooms—many of them from the original 1907 plants. Village Arts of Putney 114 Westminster Road, Putney May 29-June 2, 9a-4p: “Spring in Vermont: Painting the Garden from Life” with Kathy Anderson. Tuition $350. In this three-day workshop, Kathy provides brief demos focusing on composition and blocking in a strong design—which can be confusing when painting from life in the garden. Emphasis is on keeping flowers transparent and delicate and how to mass-in leaves without too much detail. Kathy will explain how to keep your painting true to the feeling of a natural garden while maintaining movement throughout. Register with kathy@kathyandersonstudio.com. Walker Farm 1190 Route 5, East Dummerston http://www.walkerfarm.com Display gardens and the scenic views of the Connecticut River valley provide a splendid backdrop for educational opportunities at Walker Farm, operated by the Walker family since 1770. Check the website for information on such classes as “Fruit Trees: Selecting, Growing, and Pruning Varieties for a Home Orchard,” “Raspberries, Blueberries, and Strawberries: Creating and Maintaining the Berry Patch of Your Dreams,” and “Pots in the Garden: Designing, Planting and Placing Seasonal Containers in the Garden.” The Artist’s Garden: American Impressionism and the Garden Movement (1887-1920) Bellows Falls Opera House 7 Square, Bellows Falls http://www.rockbf.org, 802 463-4766 June 22, 7p (doors open at 6:30) This 90-minute feature, taking up American impressionists and the growing popularity of gardening...

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