Arts accolades for Bennington and Brattleboro
Jun14

Arts accolades for Bennington and Brattleboro

Bennington among top small vibrant arts communities Bennington’s local color and character have been recognized for the second time by a prominent clearinghouse for arts research, trailing only that of Breckenridge, Colo., and Summit Park, Utah, in rankings for small arts-vibrant communities. The National Center for Arts Research (NCAR), an extension of Southern Methodist University in Dallas, has heaped praise on the Bennington micro-area, which includes Manchester. NCAR notes the region boasts vital arts and entertainment venues such as the Bennington Museum, Dorset Playhouse, Vermont Arts Exchange, and Southern Vermont Arts Center. A spokesperson for the Bennington Downtown Alliance says the BDA hopes that Bennington’s high rank on the NCAR Top Arts-Vibrant Small Communities list will continue to boost tourism, an industry on which both Bennington and Manchester rely heavily. NCAR’s most recent arts-vibrancy index is its third annual ranking. The index covers the country and aims to recognize arts vibrancy “in all of its innumerable iterations.” In announcing the ranking, Zannie Giraud Voss, director of NCAR, notes that “In the current climate, it is more important than ever to recognize the vital role that the arts play in creating dynamic places to live, work, and visit. The index helps us understand what factors contribute to making an urban area artistically vibrant and culturally rich, and illustrates how vibrancy manifests in a wide variety of forms that are often tied to that community’s unique identity.” On its website [http://mcs.smu.edu/artsresearch2014], NCAR notes it provides a toolkit of evidence-based insights into the health of arts and cultural organizations in America. Brattleboro polls high in crafts Meanwhile, Brattleboro recently ranked sixth on an American Craft Week poll of America’s favorite places to enjoy a vibrant craft scene. Others on the list included No. 1 Seagrove, N.C., No. 2 Gatlinburg, Tenn., No. 3 Berea, K.Y., No. 4 Cumberland Valley, Penn., and No. 5 Asheville, N.C. American Craft Week is a project of Craft Retailers & Artists for Tomorrow (CRAFT), a nonprofit trade organization. See for yourself why the polls place Brattleboro so highly. Downtown boasts the venerable Vermont Artisan Designs, a fixture here for more than 35 years. This classic American craft store, at 106 Main St., represents the best of 350 American craftspeople—and in particular a large collection produced by the many craftspeople living and working in Vermont. Unique jewelry, blown glass, pottery, wrought iron, pewter, turned wood, and clocks and chimes fill the first floor. Upstairs, in Gallery 2, visitors discover a remarkable variety of paintings and sculpture. Store owner Greg Worden says he, like so many who’ve visited Brattleboro only to fall in love with the place, just gets Brattleboro’s appeal:...

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Big cheese: Seven Vermont cheeses win first place honors
Jun14

Big cheese: Seven Vermont cheeses win first place honors

Congratulations to the five skilled Vermont artisans who walked away with seven first-place honors at this year’s United States Championship Cheese Contest in Green Bay, Wisconsin. According to the Wisconsin Cheese Makers Association, which hosts the annual competition, the nation’s largest technical cheese, butter, and yogurt competition breaks records each year for the number of entries and number of cheesemakers participating. At the March 7-9 event, held at Lambeau Field, the Green Mountain State’s best went toe-to-toe with competitors representing a combined 2,303 cheese entries from 33 states. Vermont’s 2017 best-of-class winners are von Trapp Farmstead of Waitsfield (in blue-veined cheeses with exterior molding, for “Mad River Blue”); Cellars at Jasper Hill of Greensboro Bend (in Brie and Camembert, Harbison, and Willoughby); Vermont Creamery of Websterville (in crème fraîche); Terry Chase of Cabot Creamery Collective, of Cabot, (in reduced-fat hard cheeses, with “Vermont 50 percent Reduced-Fat Jalapeno”); and GVC Cheesemakers of Grafton Village (in hard sheep’s milk, with “Bear Hill”). Get your cheese on for 2018, when the World Championship Cheese Contest takes place March 6-8 at the Monona Terrace Convention Center in Madison,...

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ART Manchester set to pop: Southern Vermont Arts Center puts town in spotlight
Jun14

ART Manchester set to pop: Southern Vermont Arts Center puts town in spotlight

Southern Vermont Arts Center is gearing up to offer exhibition space throughout the town of Manchester. The initiative, dubbed ART Manchester, aims to connect Vermont artists with visitors and residents by converting storefronts into pop-up art galleries. Organizers say the exhibits will provide opportunities for local artists to display and sell their work. The showcase is set to run from late June through Labor Day, with artists committing to slots of at least two weeks. Also in the works for ART Manchester: an art walk series that will take participants around town to various arts destinations on scheduled dates throughout the summer. Meanwhile, many building owners in town are volunteering their storefronts for ART Manchester, saying they’re excited to help promote the town as a vital arts destination. Alissa Hauben, for example, says the Hauben family is delighted to continue its long tradition of support of the arts by permitting the use of some of its properties to the ART Manchester festival for residents and tourists alike to enjoy. Pauline Moore, economic development coordinator for the Town of Manchester, says of the project, “We are delighted to see the enthusiasm and engagement of local building owners. The partnership is a wonderful example of coming together for the benefit of the community. We appreciate everyone’s commitment.” Southern Vermont Arts Center’s interim executive director, Joan Teaford, notes that her organization, founded in 1922 with a mission to provide opportunities for local artists, is similarly delighted to continue this tradition by offering ART Manchester prime space in shopping areas in town. “Manchester has a long history as an arts destination, and ART Manchester provides a real chance to highlight this area as the arts community that it is,” Teaford tells us....

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With a song in their hearts: Green Mountain Camp for Girls celebrates 100 years
Jun14

With a song in their hearts: Green Mountain Camp for Girls celebrates 100 years

By Joyce Marcel It’s not every day that you hear of something that’s still going strong after 100 years. Especially not something for girls. And certainly not in the tiny town of Dummerston, Vermont. But this summer, the Green Mountain Camp for Girls is celebrating its 100th year with reunions, shared memories, singing, feasting, dancing, sport, and yes, s’mores. It’s also mounting a Centennial Campaign to raise $100,000 for capital improvements. The camp seems to inspire the girls who go there. “We’re helping people recapture a very good time in their lives,” says current camp director, former GMC camper, and former counselor Billie Slade. “People who live all over the country are making plans to come and meet other people from their sessions. Probably the oldest coming is in her 80s. I’ve had conversations with people who are 90 years old. I met a woman here who was here in the 1930s! Just the smell of the lodge was enough for her and she started singing ‘Always in the Moonlight.’ I can’t remember what I had for breakfast, but I remember that song as if it were yesterday. It’s our goodnight song. We all stand in a circle to sing it. It becomes a part of you,” Slade recalls. The camp was begun by two teen-aged girls, Sarah Bradley and Grace Holbrook, in 1917, in response to a Thompson Trust study that concluded, contrary to popular belief, that rural children were not living healthier lives than their urban counterparts. According to Richard Epstein, Bradley’s grandson and the current president of the camp’s board of directors, there was plenty for such a camp to accomplish at the time: “Just imagine a rural family farm in Vermont in 1917. No highways and lots of hills and valleys which make getting around more difficult. So these farm family kids were really isolated. And they were worked hard. Grandmother and Grace Holbrook saw a need for girls to socialize, to get out of their isolated farms, to learn about one another, to sing songs, and have a fun time away from the chores of the farm. And to give them some kind of health education in the hope they might bring back some of the hygiene skills they learned at camp back to the farms.” Epstein remembers his grandmother fondly. “She was a wonderful woman,” he says. “Her ancestry was very tied to Vermont. Steven Rowe Bradley was a Revolutionary War general. Another ancestor was William Czar Bradley. He surveyed and negotiated the Treaty of Ghent, which defined the border between Canada and the state of Maine and the U.S. So she came from...

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Radiant at 25: Rock River Arts Open Studios Tour marks milestone
Jun14

Radiant at 25: Rock River Arts Open Studios Tour marks milestone

By Ann C. Landenberger The arts thrive along the winding, craggy Rock River in Southern Vermont. Witness the Rock River Artists Open Studio Tour: What started as a humble cooperative among Williamsville, South Newfane, and Newfane artists now heralds its quarter-century mark. In 1993 photographer Christine Triebert, then new to South Newfane from a career in Boston, noted a cluster of area artists all producing extraordinary work in a variety of media from studios tucked away on the banks, in the woods, and along dirt roads lacing the area. She cast the notion of an artists’ open studio, and soon she and co-founder Carol Ross launched the tour as a one-day offering that drew a largely local audience. Twenty-five years later, Triebert tells us, the participating artists, the tour event, and her own work have grown and evolved significantly. “New artists have joined, some have retreated, and others have rejoined. Throughout, the RRA has been a collection of established professional artists working consistently in their field who welcome visitors from within a boundless radius to learn about the art that’s spawned along the Rock River,” she says. In that time the RRA tour has matured into a full weekend event with a strong web and social media presence and connects with a much broader audience that it did in its inception. Guests delight in unique, behind-the-scenes looks at the locations where each artist works. In part because many tour visitors return year after year, Triebert tells us, being part of a group that’s committed to producing a top-notch show every summer charges her up and gives her the impetus to push herself to create something unique for each tour. Triebert also notes the event has brought an awareness to the region as an artist-rich community. “Before the RR artists, there wasn’t much known of the uniqueness of the Rock River region beyond its famed swimming holes. I think the name ’Rock River Artists’ gave a new face to this area as both a unique geographic locale and strong, cohesive community populated by many creative individuals.” And, she explains, that community identity resonates: “The arts are an extremely valuable and quantifiable aspect of economic life anywhere they are allowed to thrive. Visual and performance artists create a vibrancy in a community by the very nature of their creative endeavors. Artists bring visitors, participants, and dollars to the regions in which they do their work. The arts are a dynamic force behind much of what makes a community and a region feel good, lively, and complete.” According to founding member (and collage artist) Mary Welsh, the quarter-century mark naturally invites reflection....

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Wired for change: Artist Mary Admasian transforms materials of nature
Jun14

Wired for change: Artist Mary Admasian transforms materials of nature

By Meg Brazill A visit to Mary Admasian’s studio is like chancing upon an archeological dig. A rectangular table runs the length of her studio. It is covered with a curious array of objects, from a neat stack of thin, flat stones to a pitcher of wild turkey feathers to handfuls of royal blue petals drying inside a clear bag. Small white shells nestle inside a pink lined box and a pair of rusty barbed-wire knots rests on a flowered takeout tray. Nearby, an aluminum pie plate—a palette of red, yellow and black paint—hints at the recent history of Admasian’s work in the studio. The materials are messy: they crumble, fade, and decay. The studio is impeccable. The great outdoors as pop-up studio Admasian describes herself as “mostly multi-disciplinary” because she often works with a variety of media. The outdoors is her workshop of choice, so her studio, downstairs in her house, is largely devoted to preparing, organizing, and storing materials. Larger materials, such as branches, wire, and wood, are stored in the attached garage. It’s tempting to call her materials “ingredients” as there is a certain alchemy that occurs as she works with them. “I primarily work outside,” Admasian says. “I call it my pop-up studio.” She and her husband, Peter Lind, live on a farm in East Montpelier with beautiful, long views. It’s easy to see the appeal of working outdoors, as well as the practicality of it. “I like really strong natural light so I can see everything I’m creating. So much of my work is made from natural objects that there’s a lot of cutting, painting and drying. And a lot of building—I build inside and outside,” she explains. Admasian combs the fields and woods to source rocks, wood, bones, feathers, and butterflies. She scours flea markets and alerts friends as a secondary means of foraging. One notable exception to her use of natural materials is barbed wire, which is often found in the woods. Different gauges and strengths of the wire and different types and sizes of barbs make each kind unique. They’re made for different uses—meant to contain and protect, and often to assert, “Keep Out.” “There’s an endless narrative to barbed wire,” Admasian says. “It provokes a lot of things for the people who engage with it.” Barbed wire is difficult to handle and can quickly cause damage. “I wear heavy-duty gardening gloves and I have a code of how I handle the metal. If I’m careful of what I’m doing, I don’t get hurt,” Admasian says with the voice of experience. Out of bounds and between the lines In Mary Admasian’s...

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Chef-owned T.J. Buckley’s: Eight tables, dinner only, and amazing
Jun14

Chef-owned T.J. Buckley’s: Eight tables, dinner only, and amazing

The movement that would sweep the world didn’t yet exist when Chef Michael Fuller went into business 34 years ago, but even then he was running his restaurant and living his life according to its main tenet: local is king. Fuller opened T.J. Buckley’s in a restored 1925 Worcester dining car that had housed a so-called greasy spoon eatery. “We served breakfast and brunch. It was a small place with a limited menu and a lot of attention was given to detail,” Fuller recalls of the restaurant’s early days. A few years later, he decided to serve dinner only and focus on an ingredient-driven menu. The evolution of serving local produce and products started immediately, he says. “It was before farm-to-table was a thing. I know all the area produce growers within a 15-mile radius, some for more than 30 years.” These days, the intimate eight-table Elliot Street restaurant, which features an open kitchen and vintage decor, is listed as one of two reasons Brattleboro enjoys its standing among Fodor’s and Frommer’s Top 10 Best Small Towns in America and best restaurant rankings in America, respectively. Fuller has lived the farm-to-table lifestyle since he was 19 years old in the mid-’70s. He lived in a collective household and helped care for communal organic gardens. There were many communes in the area then, Fuller recalls. By the time he had the opportunity to apprentice for Rene Chardain, then owner of Four Columns Inn and Restaurant in Newfane, he was comfortable working with these ingredients. Four Columns was the first true farm-to-table restaurant, preceding Alice Waters’s Chez Panisse, in Berkeley, Calif., by four years. “Rene was an old-world French chef who ran the Four Columns like a country inn,” Fuller explains. “The menu was very seasonal, and the restaurant closed during the off-season.” He adds of Chardain, whose property boasted a trout pond and visiting birds, “he had a patch of wild watercress I used to pick from, and I’d collect chanterelle mushrooms. It introduced me to foraging.” Fuller’s French culinary training is evident in that he cooks simple, elegant food with clean flavors. A vegetarian along with his wife and children, he has perfected the art of—and often builds his menu around—what he collects in the wild during his mountain biking excursions. His skills were featured in a recent episode of “Filthy Riches,” a National Geographic series that focuses on foraged and wild foods and the chefs who integrate them into their cuisine. Fuller’s favorite wild edibles include ramps (wild leeks, which he either candies or pickles), and morel, chanterelle, hedgehog, and maitake and matsutake mushrooms. Black trumpet mushrooms feature...

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Chef-owned Williamsville Eatery: Keeping it real
Jun14

Chef-owned Williamsville Eatery: Keeping it real

By Nicole Colson When Dylan Richardson was in high school, he worked making pizzas at what was then the 185-year-old Williamsville General Store. The store, which opened in 1828 and closed in 2007, still enjoys standing as one of the longest continually run general stores in Vermont. At the time, however, Richardson couldn’t have imagined that he’d be operating a restaurant on the same spot years later with his family. But opportunity knocked six years ago when Richardson, then 25 and living in Boston, received a phone call from the store’s former owner, Robert Goldenhill, who told Richardson he was considering turning the building into housing. That said, went the offer, would Dylan like to lease it for his own business? “I wasn’t thinking about doing something at the scale of a restaurant,” Richardson recalls, “but I also didn’t want to pass this up.” So he called his father, Glenn, who along with Richardson’s mother, Lauri, was running a graphic design business in Newfane and was also a food enthusiast. “He’d entertained the idea of doing something in the culinary world,” Richardson says of his father. “That started the ball rolling.” Richardson moved back to Williamsville, and father and son opened the Williamsville Eatery in July 2014. The co-owners and chefs initially envisioned the restaurant as similar to the former general store, with casual counter service that would also serve as a café in the morning hours. “It evolved into something completely different,” Richardson recalls. The new owners created their own menu for the eatery. The men also wanted the space to be comfortable and welcoming, so they adapted the space to include a combined 25-seat dining room, a bar, and an open kitchen. They made sure to preserve key features from the general store: an old, wooden walk-in cooler and exposed beams. “We don’t want pretension in anything we do,” says Richardson. The men still work together in the kitchen, along with two additional chefs. Glenn sometimes works behind the bar. Lauri, a pastry chef who makes desserts—try her tiramisu, panna cotta and polenta lemon cake with lemon curd, which glow among her specialties—also serves the crowds. “It’s been trial by fire, learning as we go,” Richardson says. And trial by fire means more here. Much of the Williamsville Eatery’s menu is prepared in the 1,000-degree brick oven. Thursdays and Sundays are pizza nights. The eatery serves a variety of pies made with pizza dough mixed by hand that has gone through a multi-day bulk fermentation process to build flavor. Making pizza dough is Glenn’s specialty, as he has breadmaking chops honed at the Culinary Institute of America....

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Chef-owned bistro Folly: Serious whimsey
Jun14

Chef-owned bistro Folly: Serious whimsey

By Nicole Colson Peter Wallace, chef and co-owner of Folly, a 14-seat “modern neighborhood bistro” on Main Street in Wilmington, considers food a moving target. “I change the menu each week,” he says. At the same time, he brings his years of experience to the table. “I rely heavily on it,” he says, “so my food becomes more simple.” His bold flavors reflect his colorful life of travel and both working at and operating several restaurants. A Vermont native, Peter attended the Culinary Institute of America and moved to Nantucket, Mass., where he met his wife (and Folly co-owner), Kathleen, who was then working as a sous chef. The pair ran a restaurant together for nine years—òran Mór, which the couple sold—and raised two children throughout their 35 years living on the island. They also ran a café, Up for Breakfast, in Manchester, Vt., before moving back to Nantucket. Both avid skiers, the pair decided to transition out of Nantucket to live nearer to Mount Snow. “The 110-day war got tiresome,” says Peter of the summer season at the restaurant. He adds that both of their children were then in college. “Once we got to know more about Wilmington, we found a clientele we thought we could feed.” In 2013, the pair opened a café, Folly Foods, in the wake of damage left in town by Hurricane Irene. “It opened up a void in town,” Peter says. “Wilmington needed a coffee shop.” When Kathleen was recovering from knee surgery, the couple were mulling over what they wanted to do at that stage. “We’d always done dinner-only fine dining,” Peter says. They reopened a year and a half ago. Peter describes Folly as a reflection of the couple and their careers. Hurricane globes adorn the wooden tables, which Peter made. Artwork on the walls depicts oceanscapes. “It’s extremely comfortable,” Peter explains of the atmosphere. “Physically, the restaurant feels like both the restaurant we met in and the one we owned.” Kathleen, whom Peter says has an incredible palate for wine and a great eye for detail, runs the front of the house. Peter works the kitchen. And though the atmosphere is relaxed, Peter’s food is refined—and reflects his life. In the winter months away from Nantucket, Peter, who was once a commercial fisherman, and Kathleen traveled to such locales as South America, Nicaragua, the Caribbean, Spain, and France. “I spend a lot of time on spice mixes,” he says. “That defines the cooking, as far as I’m concerned.” Taste of the world Diners will find that worldly influence on the menu in such Folly dishes as Spanish octopus with hot...

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Driven to delight: Southern Vermont’s top 10 food trucks
Jun14

Driven to delight: Southern Vermont’s top 10 food trucks

There’s something about ordering your menu selection from a sandwich board, watching the chef prepare your meal, and enjoying it picnic-style out in nature. Whether it comes from a truck, wagon, or stand, food that’s made to order in this fashion is the thing to sample on long summer days. There are many to try while traveling, shopping, and exploring in the region, and the following picks are a varied representation of both types of outdoor establishments—mobile and stationary—that help keep world cuisine on the map in Southern Vermont. Andrzej’s Polish Kitchen 79 Flat St. Brattleboro 802 490-9679 Serving lunch and dinner Wed-Sat, noon-6p; Fri, noon-8p Former New York City Russian Tea Room chef Andrzej Mikijaniec cooks the traditional food of his homeland at his stand. His menu is authentic and basic. His four primary dishes are golabki, a cabbage roll of minced pork; pierogi, boiled dumplings with sweet or savory filling (his are potato and onion and he plans to add other varieties, including one with chanterelle mushrooms and a blueberry); kapusta, a dish of braised cabbage with bacon, mushroom, onion; and kielbasa. Mikijaniec uses as many local products as possible in his cooking, including vegetables from his own garden. A new menu item is bigos, a Polish stew of finely chopped meats with sauerkraut and shredded cabbage. “It takes six hours to cook,” says Mikijaniec, who this year will be using honey from his own beehives for his borscht, a cold beet soup. Bert’s Chuck Wagon 63 Main St. Putney 802 387-2751 Serving breakfast and lunch Mon, Tue, and Thur, 8a-5p; Wed, 8a-3p; Fri, 8a-7p; and Sat, 10a-3p Bert Wilkins has thrived in business behind the grill for 26 years because he cooks simple fare anyone can enjoy. His burgers are freshly ground and his chicken is all white meat. If he had to choose, he’d say his steak and cheese sub and hand-cut fries (made with canola oil) are the pride of his down-home food truck, which sports a unique pioneer-themed mural. Dosa Kitchen, Ro’s Petite Fête, and Tito’s Taqueria Retreat Farm 400 Linden St. (Route 30) Grafton Village Cheese parking lot Brattleboro Though these three mobile food services offer very different cuisines, each incorporates Grafton cheese… Dosa Kitchen. Dosa Kitchen’s food truck is known for its from-scratch South Indian food featuring the dosa, a naturally gluten-free fermented rice and lentil crêpe with a distinctive sour, tangy flavor and crisp, airy texture. Some inventive ways it’s presented on the menu include the signature dosa dog and burrito-style dosa wrap with masala sauerkraut and Grafton cheddar. Be sure to try a mango lassi (yogurt drink) to complement...

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Pressed for success: Putney Mountain Winery pours Vermont by the glass
Jun14

Pressed for success: Putney Mountain Winery pours Vermont by the glass

By Kate Dodge Rhubarb wine? A ginger liqueur? Blueberry wine? Blackcurrant cassis? These are just a few of the creative drinks we make at Putney Mountain Winery. From dry, premium dinner wines to spicy and sweet liqueurs, the flavor and feel of our wines reflect the varied, often subtle, beauty of the region and its distinctive character. Putney Mountain Winery is both solar powered and certified as a Vermont Green Business, and a highlight of the winery’s mission is to create its wines and liqueurs from locally sourced ingredients. Our winery has been locavore since before the term was coined. We create our drinks from berries, apples, pears, other fruits, and rhubarb and ginger grown on a dozen family farms in the area. Simply Rhubarb is a rich, semi-dry white table wine made from organic rhubarb grown in Dummerston, just down the road from us. This wine showcases the tart essence of fresh-picked rhubarb, underscored with a subtle earthiness. We enjoy Simply Rhubarb by itself as a cocktail, as an apéritif with cheese, with seafood, and with lemon chicken. Simply Rhubarb contains no sulfites. It is treasured by those allergic to sulfites who often proclaim it the best sulfite-free wine they ever tasted. Alas, this popular wine is only available directly from us beginning in May until it sells out in the late summer. Simply Pear, fermented from organic pears and crabapples, is a dry white table wine that pairs perfectly with scallops and lobster. The subtle pear flavor with its crabapple astringency complements the creaminess of a rich Vermont cheddar. We sometimes add a splash of our Simply Ginger liqueur to a glass of Simply Pear. Customers smile with their first taste of Rhubarb Blush. It is our most popular summer sipping wine, which we make by blending three fruit wines: rhubarb, strawberry, and raspberry. By itself Rhubarb Blush is fruity with a hint of tartness and a tantalizing aroma of fresh strawberries. We love it with a summer salad adorned with walnuts and craisins. It makes a refreshing spritzer and a satisfying tall drink in a tumbler of ice cubes. As a base for sangria it is unsurpassed. Ginger is not a traditional New England crop, and we are grateful that local farmers are beginning to cultivate it. We make our Simply Ginger liqueur with fresh, organic ginger grown in Amherst, Mass. It is subtle and delicate with a treasured spiciness. Many enjoy Simply Ginger straight up and over ice both before and after dinner. It also proves a versatile ingredient in many popular cocktails including Ginger Martinis. Kate’s favorite cocktail is a Simply Ginger/tequila “martini,” with...

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Getting ready to fly: New England Center for Circus Arts moves into new headquarters
Jun12

Getting ready to fly: New England Center for Circus Arts moves into new headquarters

Celebrating its 10th anniversary this year, the New England Center for Circus Arts moves into its new headquarters in Brattleboro this summer. The new trapezium building — an 8,600-square-foot building incorporating a gymnasium for circus arts training and performances — will be the nation’s newest custom-designed circus arts training and performance facility and will allow year-round, indoor flying trapeze training, as well as fabric/silk, juggling, contortion, unicycle, partner acrobatics, German wheel, teeterboard, and more. Summer camps and classes begin in the new building mid-June, and its Grand Opening is planned for early September. NECCA (necenterforcircusarts.org) serves more than 2,000 individuals of all ages — toddlers to 80 and up — in a range of skill levels and programs, including recreational community classes, professional-level training, and outreach programs serving at-risk and disadvantaged youth. We’re told people come from around the world to learn at NECCA — and from around our own neighborhoods, as well. NECCA’s pro students are employed in circuses and theaters, cabarets and concert tours, vaudeville street shows and operas, in venues of every size and scope throughout the industry and the...

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