A fortunate life: Morning coffee with artists Wolf Kahn and Emily Mason
Sep27

A fortunate life: Morning coffee with artists Wolf Kahn and Emily Mason

By Joyce Marcel In the summer, artists Wolf Kahn and Emily Mason live and paint in paradise: a blessed hillside in Southern Vermont. At 90, Kahn is a colorist; Mason, 85, is an abstract painter whose focus is color. The rest of the year the treasured members of the Windham County community live in New York City, where they each have a studio. They arrived in Brattleboro somewhat accidentally. In 1967, the couple began looking for a summer home; they found a house on a large parcel in Maine. “Only problem was it was on the road to the dump, and there was a long line of seagulls on the roof and that didn’t sit so well with my wife,” Kahn told me on a recent visit. “Then a friend drove us around Vermont and we found this house.” “This house” is an old, mostly renovated shingled farmhouse tucked into the side of a hill. The views are spectacular. Lush, green mountains roll off to the distance, while closer in, landscaping that has taken years to develop encircles the house and hillside. The trees and bushes bend with blueberry, peach, and apple, all soon to be jams, jellies, and cordials. Colorful flowers bloom everywhere. The water-lily-covered pond is home to large frogs and two-foot-long koi. Next to the house sits a huge, shingled barn. Two smaller outbuildings at hand house the artists’ studios. Inside the main house, a kerosene light mounted in the kitchen pantry gives a flavor of how the place looked when the couple bought this 1900-era property in 1968. The price: $9,000. Back then water came into the house through a gravity feed. The bathroom was in the basement. Changes, of course, have been made. Today the plumbing is modern, and electricity courses through the wires. The couple enjoys a cathedral ceiling in their bedroom: a more recent addition. The rugs on the floor are old and Oriental, and the paintings on the walls are not by Kahn and Mason. “I never have my own work in my own home,” Kahn told me. “It makes me too nervous. It’s never good enough.” We were sitting in an alcove dining room that’s walled with old barn board and filled with vases of flowers—including a collection of enormous pink and white peonies. Orchids bloomed on a coffee table nearby. Outside the window, three bird feeders were hung high in a tree, out of the reach of any errant bears. A multitude of colorful birds flew among the feeders seeking seed. I saw orioles, goldfinches, woodpeckers, red-winged blackbirds, cardinals, and scarlet tanagers. They made it hard to pay attention...

Read More
Scott MacDonald: A man, a plan, and lots of guitars
Sep27

Scott MacDonald: A man, a plan, and lots of guitars

By Meg Brazill Imagine a cabin at the edge of a woods with everything at the ready, even freshly brewed coffee. Light filters in through a canopy of trees. Outside, it’s noisy with birdsong and the rustle of wildlife just out of view. Scott MacDonald, who makes and repairs guitars and stringed instruments, turned his dream to reality this year: he pounded the last nail in place and moved his luthier business of 25 years from Long Island to Chester, Vt. Moving to a new place is never easy. Moving a business requires planning, confidence and, ultimately, a leap of faith. MacDonald was prepared for the challenge. “I’ve been building, repairing and restoring guitars, basses, ukuleles, banjos and fretted instruments for over 25 years,” he says. “I feel blessed to be able to earn a living doing what I love.” Completing the renovations on his 875-square-foot studio fulfills a decades-long dream for MacDonald. His studio is part hangout, part retreat, and all business: at any given time he’s at work on a variety of instruments, especially guitars, and is sometimes playing one. The studio is light and airy and outfitted with the tools of the luthier trade plus such essentials as a coffeemaker and a couple of paintings by Vermont artist Jesse Azarian to get the mojo right. And the feng shui. It’s also climate controlled, which is essential to doing guitar work. S.B. MacDonald Custom Instruments is a factory-authorized service/warranty center for Martin, Taylor, and Gibson guitars. MacDonald also repairs modern, vintage, and historic instruments by any manufacturer. He splits his time about equally between guitar making and restoration work. “I’ve been working on a lot of vintage instruments for a long time,” MacDonald says. “When you make guitars, it gives you a lot of insight into them. Vintage instruments are very sacred to me.” ’This isn’t just a business, it’s a calling’ MacDonald is also a banjo and ukulele historian. He’s repaired and restored numerous instruments using historically accurate techniques and antique parts to preserve a piece’s spirit, appearance, and value. He offers full service repair and restoration for other fretted instruments, including mandolins, lap steels, and resophonic instruments such as Dobro, National and Weissenborn Hawaiian guitars. He trained by reading and by attending workshops and conferences where he has had the opportunity to get to know some of the world’s greatest luthiers. It provided one-on-one information on problem solving. Over the decades, there are few repair or restoration problems MacDonald hasn’t come across, and he treats each instrument with the utmost care and respect. “I’d never do anything on someone else’s instrument that I hadn’t done...

Read More
Out of the studio: Craft tour artists talk about living with art
Sep27

Out of the studio: Craft tour artists talk about living with art

By Ann C. Landenberger Beautiful, functional and now local. Using handmade objects in the home continues to be a pleasure. Now with emphasis on the benefits of upcycled, recycled, and environmentally green artwork, careful selection allows us to be socially responsible too. The fact that buying from Vermont artists puts money back into the Vermont economy makes this an even better action for the homeowner, the artist, and the community. — Martha Fitch, Executive Director, Vermont Crafts Council, which celebrates 27 Years in 2017! Fall Open Studio Oct 14 & 15. Information: http://www.vermontcrafts.com/OSW/fallOSWForm.php At first blush, Putney and her neighboring towns look merely sleepy and sweet. This is quintessential Vermont, replete with the charm of rustic barns and fertile farms. But, of course, Putney is home to the oldest continuing craft studio tour in North America, and that flat-out rocks. For 39 years, myriad artists and crafters have opened their doors here to visitors from the region and well beyond for Thanksgiving weekend. We’re all invited behind the scenes, under the hood, and into new worlds where we spend time with many of Vermont’s most powerfully creative voices, and it’s a tradition we love. We wondered, though, what these artists do with their time around the tour, when their studios can be messy or in full-tilt production. How is life lived when we’re not around? What does this life—this continuing, evolving, exciting process—look and feel like from within? Here are seven of these creators in their own words. Julia Brandis ‘Living by a brook is interesting…’ In Westminster, stained-glass artist Julia Brandis, a 10-year tour participant, lives in palpable tranquility. At a wood slab kitchen counter lit by two handsome hanging lamps Brandis created for the space, she explains that “living with stained glass is about colored light. It creates a different atmosphere. The changing light is mood-altering. It’s natural and flowing.” Having first felt the impulse of Tiffany, Brandis was soon inspired by Frank Lloyd Wright and Charles Rennie Macintosh, by Art Nouveau and the Arts and Crafts movement. That’s evident throughout, especially in her lampshades, where curves meet straight edges as the brook outside her home meets the road. “Living by a brook is interesting,” Brandis reflects, “because I see how land is constantly changing over time.” Her work is inspired by nature. Some designs are organic; others are much more linear. But even within the linear, trees and mountains emerge, and water images course through much of Brandis’s work. In her living room, in lieu of a drape, an elegant panel covers a window. The verdant landscape beyond only enriches various shapes and shades of green....

Read More
Wine Observed: Smitten by Grüner Veltliner, our introduction to Austrian wines
Sep26

Wine Observed: Smitten by Grüner Veltliner, our introduction to Austrian wines

By Marty Ramsburg One of the great things about owning a wine shop is that we have to try a lot of different wines. (I must say here that the greatest thing about owning a shop—hands down—remains our terrific, interesting and loyal customers. I am sorry if it sounds like pandering, but it is nonetheless true). We first became enamored with Austrian wines in 2006 just after we opened Windham Wines. Until then, we drank wines made mostly from the handful of grapes with which we were familiar. Within that small world we narrowed further to mostly red wines. We had a lot of catching up to do to stock a wine shop. Our introduction to Austrian wines was Grüner Veltliner, and we were smitten. As Jancis Robinson, Master of Wine, notes on her website, “no self-respecting restaurant wine list, whether in New York or Hong Kong, can afford to be without at least one example of this, Austria’s signature wine grape.” Why? Because “the quality of all Austrian wines has become so excitingly and consistently high,” she says. The path to that glowing reputation was rocky. After WWII, the Austrian wine market focused on bulk production of Grüner and Riesling, both for its home market and for its principal export market, Germany. Then in 1985, a group of Austrian farmers, pharmacists, and wine brokers was caught adding diethylene glycol, also found in antifreeze, to its bulk wines to enhance their perceived sweetness. The market for Austrian wine collapsed. Millions of bottles were destroyed, dumped into the ovens of cement plants so that their contents wouldn’t contaminate sewers. West Germany banned the import of Austrian wine. That scandal produced at least two consequential changes for Austrian wine: the passage, in August of 1985—just before that year’s harvest—of strict regulations to ensure wine purity over quantity, and a search for sweetness that led wine brokers to search for substitutes to ripeness and natural sugars in the berries, causing Austrian wine producers to shift to drier wines that could be made even in cooler years when natural sugars were lower. The highest quality of wines within the resulting six-tier Prädikatswein system pass rigorous testing in which each wine is examined visually and chemically, tasted, and found to be typical for the variety and vintage. The wines that qualify for the level of quality and pass those scientific and taste requirements boast an examination number on their cap or cork. Austria now makes what Karen MacNeil’s “The Wine Bible” describes as “some of the raciest, most exciting wines in Europe. To taste them is to be convinced.” We’re convinced, and so are...

Read More
Design Observed: New theaters design the experience
Sep26

Design Observed: New theaters design the experience

It’s been a momentous year for two venerable Southern Vermont performing arts institutions. The Weston Playhouse Theater Company and the Brattleboro Music Center both embarked on ambitious building projects that resulted in state-of-the-art performing arts centers that recently opened, which will allow both facilities to expand their offerings, provide enhanced audience experience and take them into the future. By Katherine P. Cox Brattleboro Music Center was designed first and foremost with acoustics in mind. Unlike many theaters or auditoriums, BMC is a purpose built music venue. The primary performance hall was designed specifically as a chamber music hall with the same size and proportions of the spaces the music was originally composed for. Aside from performance spaces, BMC has 15 instructional studio spaces to support their music education mission.  All of these spaces were created from a former elementary school. Rooms were sized and shaped for the instrument being played.  Sound separation between the rooms was the critical consideration. —Austin K. Smith, AIA, RLA LEED AP, Principal, Scott Simons Architects The Brattleboro Music Center has been around since Blanche Honegger Moyse founded it in 1952 in a moment in the history of arts in this area that Mary Greene, BMC’s managing director and a former member of the board of trustees, describes as pivotal. So it’s fitting that the magnificent reimagined music center, which just opened in July, rises on Blanche Moyse Way, across from Living Memorial Park. The center is a state-of-the-art music facility that houses a music school and auditorium that BMC’s staff and board have long envisioned in years operating out of a church on Walnut Street that Greene says was a gracious temporary home, but one simply not designed to house a music school. The new Brattleboro Music Center, designed by Scott Simon Architects of Portland, Maine, has very definitely been designed with music in mind and motion. Scott Simon specializes in music education spaces, and Greene says the firm has been integral to the project “since we first started dreaming about it almost 10 years ago.” Also key to the project’s success is Acentech, the multi-disciplinary acoustical consulting firm based in Cambridge, Mass., which proved its mettle to BMC with its work on education spaces such as the Berklee College of Music and the New England Conservatory of Music, both in Boston. With DEW Construction Corp. and The MacMillin Company providing their expertise, the team broke ground last September and brought the project in on time and on budget. Bringing the dream to resounding life The new center is a dream come true for BMC, and in Greene’s words “another way in which Brattleboro’s commitment to...

Read More
Retail grace: Brattleboro merchants import goods with rich backstories
Sep26

Retail grace: Brattleboro merchants import goods with rich backstories

By Nicole Colson When we give businesses our patronage—in, say, grabbing a cup of coffee on the way to work, looking for a special gift, or picking out home decor—most of us probably don’t give much thought to the stories behind the products we buy. It might surprise us to learn that several downtown Brattleboro retailers help populations around the world land an education, feed their families, and make a decent wage for a better quality of life. At the same time, these business owners are working to build relationships with far-flung communities to help preserve indigenous lifestyles. It turns out that importing traditional handcrafts and working with the makers to produce styles and colors for the American market rings in as a resounding win for the purchaser, the maker, and the business. Here are five local companies we’re particularly proud to share the world with… Altiplano: Fair trade and gorgeous goods When Shari Zarin and her husband, John von Wodtke, traveled to Guatemala for the first time 25 years ago, they couldn’t have imagined where their trip would lead. In fact, the country’s Lake Atitlán was one of several locations they visited on their journey through Central and South America. “It caught our attention,” says Zarin. “Both the people and landscape are majestically beautiful, and their world-class traditional dress and weaving are alluring.” On returning home to Vermont, the couple began selling the crafts that they’d picked up there. They also made plans to return, and made the trip several times before embarking on a serious path. The couple became pioneers in the “fair trade” movement, in which fair prices are paid to producers in developing countries. The couple began to design products and to live part of the year in Guatemala. They raised three children both there and in Vermont. Altiplano, named for the Guatemalan highlands—also a nod to taking the high road in business—is a brick-and-mortar boutique on Elliott Street in Brattleboro, as well as a wholesale and retail online business. The shop offers Zarin’s jewelry and bags among an assortment of contemporary women’s clothing, toys, stationery, accessories, and decor. The couple opened the store nearly 13 years ago, after wholesaling their wares for more than two decades. Most of the business is wholesale. “We sell to a variety of catalogs and boutiques across the country, in Europe, and Australia,” Zarin tells us. She and von Wodtke visit Guatemala twice a year for five weeks at a time to develop new collections: spring and summer and fall and winter. There, they work with many cooperative groups, small family businesses, and their own fair trade workshop. Their...

Read More
39th Annual Putney Craft Tour
Sep26

39th Annual Putney Craft Tour

Putney enjoys one of the most exciting concentrations of artists in the state. A wealth of artists came to the area in the 1960s and ’70s as part of the back-to-the-land movement and put down roots. Each year for three days at Thanksgiving many of these artists open their studios to the public as part of the Putney Craft Tour, the country’s oldest continuously run craft tour. If this isn’t part of your fall tradition yet it soon might be. Going on the tour is a great experience for the whole family. For one thing, it’s the perfect time to purchase one-of-a-kind holiday gifts straight from the artists. Many folks make a weekend of it, staying year after year in such local B&Bs as Hickory Ridge House in Putney and the Four Columns Inn in nearby Newfane. Guests know it’s fun to meander the back roads and find the studios, where the artists will be waiting for a chat—and to show off their process and wares. Even better: Next Stage Arts and Sandglass Theater welcome fall gusts by offering special nighttime performances. Participating restaurants offer Putney Craft Tour specials too. Not a bad deal, and it’s sweeter every year. See you soon! http://www.putneycrafts.com Gallery Opening Preview of 39th Putney Craft Tour Twelve Putney Craft Tour artists will participate in a special exhibition this October at the Latchis Gallery in downtown Brattleboro. The exhibition is a preview of work that will be featured in the Putney Craft Tour’s open studio tour during Thanksgiving weekend. Artists participating include Judy Hawkins, Nancy Calicchio, Colleen Grout, Ken Pick, Dena Gartenstein Moses, Jess Fox, Jeanne Bennett, Edel Byrne, Phil Pellerin, Fiona Morehouse, Ryan Burch, and Bob Burch. An opening reception is planned for Thursday, Oct 5 from 6 to 8p. Refreshments will be served, including Putney Winery’s Putney Bubbly and award-winning cheese from Parish Hill Creamery. On Thanksgiving weekend (Nov 24-26, 10a-5p) Putney celebrates Craft, Culinary and Performance Weekend highlighted by the 39th annual Putney Craft Tour, a Top-10 Vermont Winter event. For more information, visit...

Read More
Cotton Mill Arts Open Studio and Holiday Sale
Sep26

Cotton Mill Arts Open Studio and Holiday Sale

Cotton Mill Hill, Brattleboro, Dec 1–3 This 19th annual seasonal event celebrates the work and creations of artists, musicians, bakers, cooks, and craftspeople of the Cotton Mill, and many other talented, juried artists and artisans from Brattleboro and surrounding communities. This popular spirited, sensory extravaganza spread throughout the three floors of the Mill is sure to provide something for everyone. Tenants invite you to visit their studios, while local artists invite you to visit their booths. Experience a variety of tasty culinary delights, exhilarating performances, music, and media presentations, and purchase artistic creations: iron art, pottery, functional wooden art, jewelry, cosmetics, sachets, woven goods, pet products, and did we mention culinary delights? In addition, student artwork will be on display throughout the building. There will be a number of volunteers on hand to guide visitors around the three floors of the Cotton Mill. Free admission. Register for a free raffle food basket and purchase raffle tickets for additional products created by the artists and artisans....

Read More
Open studio tours and arts festivals
Sep26

Open studio tours and arts festivals

North Bennington Outdoor Sculpture Show Downtown Bennington http://www.northbennington.org Thru Oct 29: Artist Joe Chirchirillo organizes and curates the 20th annual North Bennington Outdoor Sculpture Show. Through the ages, classic sculpture—whether a Greek or Roman marble or a Far East depiction of Buddha—tends to follow a familiar visual aesthetic with which most lovers of art, as well as the lay public, are familiar. Enter sculpture with an edge to it and leave behind any notions gained from classic renditions of that medium. River Valley Artisan Tour Chesterfield, Spofford and Westmoreland, NH http://www.rivervalleyartisans.com Sept 9-10 The River Valley Artisan Tour is a self-guided tour through the towns of Spofford, Chesterfield and Westmoreland, N.H. Visiting artists in their own studios and in Fellowship Hall. In celebration this year, two wineries will join in for a fabulous weekend of art, wine, food, and fun. Visit online for a map and more information. Bennington Quiltfest Mt. Anthony Union Middle School, Bennington http://www.benningtonquiltfest.com Sept 16-17 Show offers new quilts, demonstrations, queen-size quilt raffle, challenge quilts, special exhibits, many vendors, and mouthwatering fare from the Quiltfest Cafe. Our featured quilter and lecturer, Joan Ford of Hummingbird Highway and author of “Scrap Therapy” and “Scraps Plus One,” will give one lecture at 1p daily. You’ll also find our consignment boutique open with a large selection of items for sale. Annual Vermont Fine Furniture Woodworking & Forest Festival Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock http://www.Vermontwood.com Sept 23-24 Enjoy furniture and wood product shopping at Billings Farm & Museum at this year’s event. Vermont woodworking vendors will sell their unique wood products such as carvings, home accessories, jewelry, bedroom and dining furniture, and toys and games. In the barns, see farm work first-hand, including care of the Jersey herd, draft horses, sheep, oxen, and chickens. Explore the horse barn, calf nursery, milk room, and dairy barn and get comfortable with the farm’s livestock through interactive activities, programs, and events. Activities include wagon rides, horse logging, hands-on wood crafting, sawmill demos, forest walks, and many educational programs. 29th Manchester Fall Arts & Craft Fest Route 7A, Manchester http://www.craftproducers.com Sept 29-Oct 1 Coming to the Manchester Fall Art and Craft Festival is an opportunity to celebrate the wonders of American Craft. Every day thousands of American artists share their vision and talent by producing amazing hand-made decorative and functional objects. Craft show patrons demonstrate their love of these items by coming to the shows, meeting the artists, and buying handmade products. As one craft artist puts it, this is the creative economy. Fallapalooza Downtown Bennington http://www.betterbennington.com Sept 30-Oct 1, 11a-4p Bring the kids to store-to-store trick-or-treating for gifts and games between 11a...

Read More
Columbus Day weekend
Sep26

Columbus Day weekend

Heirloom Apple Tasting Day Scott Farm, Dummerston http://www.scottfarmvermont.com Oct 8, 10a, 12p, 2p Each October during Columbus Day weekend we open our packing barn at Scott Farm for an heirloom apple tasting celebration. Our orchard manager, Ezekiel Goodband, offers all a taste of a select group of apples while sharing apple lore. What was Thomas Jefferson’s favorite apple? Who was Mr. Greening and what was his claim to fame? Come visit us on Apple Tasting Day and buy mixed bags of heirloom apples or many of one kind for eating out of hand, sauce making, pie baking, or a tarte Tatin. Dummerston Apple Pie Fest Dummerston Congregational Church Oct 8 For more than 40 years, the Dummerston Apple Pie Festival has been held each year on the Sunday of Columbus Day weekend, the peak of colorful autumn foliage in Southern Vermont. A full 1,500 apple pies are made by many church members and friends and proudly served with Vermont cheese and hand churned ice cream. A farmer’s breakfast, grilled lunch, tag sale, and craft fair make the festival a whole day event. Folks from all over the Northeast travel by motorcycle and automobile to take part in the festivities. Stratton Columbus Day Weekend Stratton Resort http://www.stratton.com Oct 7-9 It’s the time of year when our beautiful Green Mountains transform into a symphony of fiery reds, vibrant oranges, and yellows. Enjoy fall colors and take in the beauty from Southern Vermont’s highest peak. Fill your Columbus Day weekend with events like the craft brewfest, chili cookoff, live music and north face race to the summit. Fun, games, live music, food and friends at Stratton. Stratton will be buzzing with plenty to do and see. Vermont Open Studio Statewide http://www.Vermontcrafts.com Oct 14-15 Brought to you by the Vermont Crafts Council, 108 craftspeople and artists look forward to welcoming you to their studios for conversation, browsing, and sales. Studios are located throughout the state, in picturesque villages, along back roads and in vibrant town centers. Where to begin? The Crafts Council has a map available at Vermont welcome centers and galleries. Some Open Studio travelers begin by choosing a section of the state they have always wanted to visit; others seek out a specific medium such as pottery or furniture or watercolors. Some just follow the yellow signs along the roads that highlight designated open studio...

Read More
Pumpkin fests
Sep26

Pumpkin fests

33rd Townshend Pumpkin Festival Townshend, on the Common http://www.townshenvermont.org Oct 14 The Pumpkin Festival is a country fair with a craft show, plus pumpkin decorating contest, Halloween costume parade, best pumpkin pie contest, food vendors, and free pony rides for kids during Vermont’s foliage season. Buy your pumpkin pies whole or by the piece. Manchester Pumpkin Festival Equinox Valley Nursery, Manchester http://www.visitmanchestervt.com Oct 14 This year’s festival includes such perennial favorites as wagon rides, crazy corn maze, bouncy house, kids’ crafts, pumpkin painting, scarecrow stuffing, cider donut eating contest, and other fun-filled activities. Highlights of the day include the costume parade and contest at 1p and the Witches of the Northshire, who will gather for a photo around the bubbling cauldron at 1:30p. Come in costume to join the fun! Grand opening, Newfane Railroad Station and the West River Railroad Museum Newfane 802 348-7891 Sat, Oct 14 Ribbon cutting at noon followed by unveiling of the West River Railroad historic marker. The afternoon will include guided (and self guided) tours of the old Depot Building and Water Tank House, along with telegraph demonstrations, music, and food. The Historical Society of Windham County has been restoring the 1880 Depot and Water Tank House for the past two years. The public is cordially invited. Newfane Heritage Festival Newfane, on the common http://www.newfaneheritagefestival.blogspot.com Oct 7-8, 10a-4p Once again this Columbus Day weekend tents will blossom on the Newfane Common. Historic Newfane Village will host another Heritage Festival, celebrating community, crafts, food and entertainment. Visitors return year after year for this signature event in southeastern Vermont. Hundreds of people from all over New England and beyond will gather on the Newfane Common for a quintessential Vermont experience during the beautiful fall foliage season. More than 90 juried craftspeople will display their work in the tents set up in front of the Windham County Courthouse in the center of Newfane Village, a Registered National Historic Landmark. Amid the autumn leaves, people will display and sell quilts, ironwork, pottery, furniture, photographs, jewelry, clothing and specialty foods. Along the side of Union Hall, non-profit organizations will sponsor activities for children, such as bean bag tosses and face painting. Proceeds go to the Newfane Congregational Church, which is the festival’s sponsor and an integral part of the Newfane...

Read More
Fall Festivals
Sep26

Fall Festivals

Weston Antiques Show Weston Playhouse, Weston http://www.westonantiquesshow.org Sept 28-30, 10a-5p, preview Sept 28, 7:30p Featuring renowned dealers from across the United States with American and English furniture, accessories, Americana, folk art, silver, samplers, paintings, Oriental rugs, jewelry, and more. Since the Weston Antiques Show’s inception, more than 85,000 attendees have enjoyed the show and more than $1 million has been raised for historic preservation. The Weston Antiques Show, one of the oldest shows in the country—and widely regarded as one of the best small shows—is distinguished by its dealers, location, attendees, community support, and where the proceeds go. 12th Annual ITV Fest Manchester and Dorset, VT http://www.itvfest.com Oct 11-15 ITVFest (the Independent Television and Film Festival) is the original public festival and network of the world’s best independent television pilots, web series and short films. Every year, we bring together more than 1,000 filmmakers, actors, writers, directors, producers, financiers, Hollywood executives and general public fans to relax and connect in the Vermont mountains. Unlike big city festivals, where it can be difficult to interact with the right people, ITVFest in Vermont offers a unique opportunity to meet fellow professionals and make lasting connections that can lead to prosperous careers. ITVFest broke its previous submission record with 466 independently produced television pilots, web series, short films and documentary films submitted for consideration to the 2016 festival. The previous record was 298 submissions in 2015. Projects were submitted from 35 states and from Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Singapore, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, Taiwan, Trinidad and Tobago, the United Kingdom, and Uruguay. This makes ITVFest one of the largest international competitions of independent television in the world. Forty to 50 shows and films are selected. Brattleboro Bacon Fest Fairgrounds in Guilford http://www.facebook.com/brattleborobaconfest Sept 9, 11a Come by the Guilford Fairgrounds to enjoy all things bacon! There will be bacon beer, along with samples from many different vendors. The Brattleboro Baconfest, “Bacon, Blues, and Brews,” brought to you by Classic Hits 92.7 WKVT and the Brattleboro Area Chamber of Commerce. Chester Vermont Fall Festival on the Green Chester, on the Green http://www.chesterfallfestival.org Sept 16-17, 10a-4p At the peak of Vermont’s preeminent fall foliage, the charm and elegance of the Chester Village Green will come to life as it hosts the 40th Annual Fall Craft Festival. The Chester Annual Craft Fair is a celebration of Vermont’s gifted artisans, Chester’s unique history, Vermont’s peerless beauty and its timeless, rural traditions. More than 70 artisans, craftspeople and tantalizing food purveyors from across Vermont and New England will grace the green with their stories, skills,...

Read More