Farmers’ markets
Sep26

Farmers’ markets

Saturdays Brattleboro Farmers’ Market Western Avenue (just west of Creamery Covered Bridge) Brattleboro, 9a-2p http://www.brattleborofarmersmarket.com. Norwich Farmers’ Market Route 5 south in Norwich, 9a-1p http://www.norwichfarmersmarket.org. Bennington Farmers’ Market Bennington Station, 10a-1p 802 442-8934 Londonderry – West River Farmers’ Market Routes 11 and 100, 9a-1p 802 824-4492 Rutland Downtown Farmers’ Market Depot Park, 9a-2p 802 747-4403 Springfield Community Market People’s Bank Parking Lot, 10a-1p http://www.springfieldonthemove.com Wilmington Farmers’ Market Main Street, Wilmington, 10a-3p 802 464-9069 Woodstock – Mt. Tom Farmers’ Market Mt. Tom Parking Lot, 9:30a-12:30p http://www.mttomfarmersmarket.com Sundays Jamaica Farmers’ Market Main Street, Jamaica, 10a-2p http://www.jamaicavt.com, 802 874-4151 Chester Farmers’ Market Zachary’s Pizza House, 11a-2p 802 875-2703 Dorset Farmers’ Market HN Williams Store, 10a-2p 802 558-8511 Putney Farmers’ Market Putney Co-op, 10a-2p http://www.putneyfarmersmarket.com Stowe Farmers’ Market Intersection of routes 100 and 108, Stowe, 10:30a-3p http://www.stowefarmersmarket.com Windsor Farmers’ Market On the green (State Street), 11:30a-2:30p http://www.windsorfarmersmarket.blogspot.com Tuesdays Bennington Farmers’ Market Bennington Station, 10a-1p 802 442-8934 Brattleboro Farmers’ Market On Flat Street, near downtown, 4-7p http://www.brattleborofarmersmarket.com Wednesdays Rutland Downtown Farmers’ Market Depot Park, 2-6p http://www.rutlanddowntown.com Woodstock Farmers’ Market On the Green, 3-6p http://www.woodstockvt.com Thursdays Manchester Farmers’ Market Adams Park, Manchester, 3-6p http://www.manchestermarket.org Castleton Village Farmers’ Market Main Street, Castleton, 3:30-6p 802 273-2241 Royalton Farmers’ Market South Royalton Town Green, 3-6:30p 802 763-6630 Fridays Bellows Falls Farmers’ Market Waypoint Center, 4-7p http://www.bffarmersmarket.com Brandon Farmers’ Market Central Park, Brandon, 9a-2p 802 247-8473 Fair Haven Farmers’ Market The Park, 3-6p 802 265-4240 Ludlow Farmers’ Market Main Street, 4-7p 802 734-3829 Hartland Farmers’ Market Hartland Town Library, 4-7p 802 296-2032 West Townshend Farmers’ Market West Townshend Country Store, 4-7p http://www.nofavt.org Most farmers’ markets in Vermont close by the end of October. For more information about farmers’ markets in Southern Vermont, including a full schedule, visit...

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Music and theater
Sep26

Music and theater

Actors Theatre Playhouse Main Street, West Chesterfield, NH http://www.atplayhouse.org, 877 666-1855 Sept 16: “A Delicate Balance,” a staged reading for Edward Albee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning drama. Set in Connecticut, this play features an upper-class married couple whose relationship has been an uneasy one for several years. Sept 22-Oct 17 (Fridays and Saturdays): “Uncle Vanya” by Anon Chekhov. A cautionary tale delicately balanced on the knife’s edge of tragedy and comedy about the invisible suffering of ordinary people, the futility of service to others, and the fragility of beauty and illusions, especially when born of jealousy and ennui. Brattleboro Music Center 38 Walnut St., Brattleboro http://www.bmcvt.org, 802 257-4523 Oct 8: 6th Annual Blanche Moyse Memorial Concert presents the music of J.S. Bach. Oct 29: Chamber Music Series: Gilles Vonsattel. Nov 4: Benefit Concert: Mohamed Shams. Nov 11: Chamber Music Series: Con Moto. Nov 12-13: Windham Orchestra presents “People Who Change Our Lives.” Dec 13: Music School Orchestra Concert. Dec 16: Chamber Music Series: Chiara String Quartet. Dorset Theatre Playhouse PO Box 510, Dorset http://www.dorsettheatrefestival.org, 802 867-2223 Aug 3-19: “The Legend of Georgia McBride.” A music-filled comedy by Matthew Lopez. He’s young, he’s broke, and his wife is having a baby. And now, Casey has lost his gig as an Elvis impersonator. Aug 24-Sept 2: “American Buffalo.” Regional revival of David Mamet’s American classic. This show takes a fresh look at a trio of misguided misfits who are a bit out of luck and way out of their league as they plot the theft of a rare coin collection. Latchis Theatre 50 Main St., Brattleboro http://www.latchis.com, 802 254-6300 Oct 8: The Metropolitan Opera Simulcast presents “Tristan Und Isolde,” noon. Oct 16: The Bolshoi Ballet Simulcast presents “The Golden Age,” 1p. Oct 22-23: The Metropolitan Opera Simulcast presents “Don Giovanni,” 1p. Nov 6: The Bolshoi Ballet Simulcast presents “The Bright Stream,” 1p. Dec 10: The Metropolitan Opera Simulcast presents “L’Amour de Loin,” 1p. Dec 11: The Bolshoi Ballet Simulcast presents “The Nutcracker,” 1p. New England Youth Theatre 100 Flat St., Brattleboro http://www.neyt.org, 802 246-NEYT (6398) Oct 6-8 & 13-15: “The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940.” Oct 27-29 & Nov 3-5: “Clown Town.” Dec 7-10 & 14-17: “Tuck Everlasting.” Next Stage Arts 15 Kimball Hill Road, Putney http://www.nextstagearts.org Sept 22: Next Stage Speaks presents Victoria Redel, author of three books of poetry and five books of fiction. Sept 24: “The Dancingmaster of Canterbury,” Larry Siegel’s latest verbatim musical theater portrait. Sept 30: Chris Smither, American folk singer/songwriter. Oct 20-21: Adam Strauss Returns: “The Mushroom Cure” and “The Uncertainty Principle.” Northern Stage The Barrette Center for the Arts 74 Gates St., White River Junction http://www.northernstage.org,...

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Liz Hawkes de Niord works and book at CX Silver Gallery
Sep26

Liz Hawkes de Niord works and book at CX Silver Gallery

Get in on the new exhibition and opening reception for Liz Hawkes deNiord’s paintings and clay works at Brattleboro’s CX Silver Gallery, which is publishing a gorgeous book on these groundbreaking pieces. The reception and book launch are Friday, Sept 29, from 5:30 to 7:30p, and the exhibition is open daily by appointment. Of deNiord’s work, painter Michele Burgess, the director of Brighton Press, writes that the artist “creates renderings  of the human interior and the felt spirits in the natural world. She thinks, feels, reads, and observes deeply and documents her findings through her passionate and physical work in the mediums of clay and paint. These paintings are created like relief sculptures, malleable surfaces seemingly free from the boundaries of the rectangle, and often, simultaneously, containing one or more bounded shapes.” DeNiord’s pictures, Burgess says, “become energy fields—cradling, swallowing, buffeting, or synchronizing with smaller, hard-edged forms, guided by her intuition. DeNiord’s geometric figures coexist in this charged and ambiguous space or some are caught in a state of solitude and contemplation, free to be occupied as they wish. Her personalized abstraction gives them a timeless, universal quality.” Burgess continues, “This is echoed in her artistic process—alone in time, serving the craft, and challenging it in her own way. Working with knives, brushes and, often, her own bare hands, she is intimately involved through every step of the journey, with very little pre-planning. She collaborates with her materials, tools, and concepts, fully engaged in the application of color—directing the hue, transparency, and degree of darkness to her specifications.” “Layer by layer,” Burgess says, deNiord “adds and subtracts, combining the material acts of carving and scumbling with the more ethereal gestures and filmy applications of her brush. This dance allows her to express the mercurial ranges of human emotion, free of the confines of the physical body, with tenderness and ferocity. Her paintings offer the viewer both freedom to roam and places to rest. A single painting may go through numerous iterations, sometimes over months or years, before she is satisfied. Once an image is finished, she often creates variations using the same elements or different combinations of colors, textures, and shapes within her expansive vocabulary.” The artist does this for herself, Burgess notes, “primarily with her own very high standards of craft and expression, seeking to touch our most inexplicable thoughts and feelings. For deNiord, the painting process is not about the object: it is about poetic exploration.” The book also includes poetry from Vermont Poet Laureate Chard deNiord and pieces by Burgess, Brian Cohen, Bill Kelley, and New Hampshire Poet Laureate Alice Fogel. For CX Silver Gallery’s recent publications, visit...

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At the galleries
Sep26

At the galleries

Asian Cultural Center of Vermont and C.X. Silver Gallery 814 Western Ave, Brattleboro http://www.accvt.org, 802 257-7898, ext. 1 Sept-March: Liz Hawkes deNiord’s paintings and clay works. The opening reception and book launch is Sept 29, 5:30-7:30p. Open daily by appointment. Concurrent with the exhibition, the gallery is publishing a book on Liz’s work. Catherine Dianich Gallery 139 Main St, Brattleboro Open by appointment only http://www.catherinedianichgallery.com, 802 380-1607 See website for more info. Chaffee Art Center 16 South Main St., Rutland http://www.chaffeeartcenter.org, 802 775-0356 Closed for renovation; expected to re-open in October. Crow Hill Gallery 729 Flamstead Road, Chester http://www.crowhillgallery.com, 802 875-3763 Original watercolors by Jeanne Carbonetti. Crowell Gallery at the Moore Free Library 23 West St., Newfane http://www.moorefreelibrary.wordpress.com, 802-365-7948 September: Kathie Gatto-Gurney, sculpture. October: Jason Alden. November: Maisie Crowther, oils. December: Bill Dixon, photography, “Southwest Missions.” DaVallia Art Boutique 78 Common St., Chester http://www.thedavallia.com, 802 875-1203 Featuring artwork in wood, glass, metal, pottery, stone, concrete, jewelry, and furniture. Davallia 39 North Gallery 39 North St., Chester http://www.thedavallia.com, 802-875-8900 Showcasing an evolving creative space for American handcrafted furniture, art, sculpture and home décor. Indoor and outdoor exhibits. Elaine Beckwith Gallery 3923 VT Route 30, Jamaica http://www.beckwithgallery.com, 802 874-7234 Featuring the paintings of Arnaldo Miccoli. Born in Cavallino, Italy, Miccoli graduated from the Institute of Art G. Pellegrino in Lecce and studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Rome with Gentillini. Epoch Gallery 4927 Main St., Manchester http://www.epochvermont.com, 802 768-9711 A cooperative art and craft gallery featuring 18 of Vermont’s finest artisans working in a variety of disciplines. Each day the gallery is staffed by one of the artisan members offering their unique view of the creative process. Gallery 2 and Vermont Artisan Designs 106 Main St., Brattleboro 10a-7p Mon-Sat, 11a-4p Sun http://www.buyvermontart.com, 802 257-7044 Featuring fine art and hand-crafted gifts, at Vermont Artisan Designs and Gallery 2 you’ll also find sculptures and the works of more than 350 American craftspeople are on display. Unique jewelry, blown glass, pottery, wrought iron, pewter, turned wood, jewelry boxes, clocks, chimes and the famed Vermont Folk Rocker are just some of the hard-to-find items available. This unusual gallery has been in Brattleboro for more than 35 years. Gallery at the VAULT 68 Main St., Springfield http://www.galleryvault.org, 802 885-7111 The VAULT serves the community as an educational resource with our schedule of workshops and lectures. Both the gallery and the gift shop carry only original, juried, handcrafted local and regional artwork. Gallery in the Woods 145 Main St., Brattleboro Open daily 11a-5:30p, noon-5p Sun http://www.galleryinthewoods.com, 802 257-4777 Gallery in the Woods is both a virtual gallery and a three-dimensional place. The works here express the...

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At the museums
Sep26

At the museums

Bennington Center for the Arts 44 Gypsy Lane, Bennington 10a to 5p, Mon-Sun (Closed Mon) http://www.thebennington.org, 802 442-7158 Thru Dec 23: Small Works Show. Beautiful works in a broad variety of subjects, but with a size limitation of 14 inches. Thru Sept 17: The Laumeister Fine Art Competition. Annual competition juried by Calvin Liang, a highly respected member of the Oil Painters of America and the California Art Club. Representational work is not limited to subject and each year this show offers patrons an impressive collection of work by many of the day’s finest artists. Bennington Museum 75 Main St., Route 9, Bennington 10a to 5p (Closed Wed) http://www.benningtonmuseum.org, 802 477-1571 Thru Nov. 5: Grandma Moses: American Modern. On view at the Bennington Museum, its final venue, this exhibit has a subversive goal, for it will upset your expectations and get you to look at this beloved American artist with fresh eyes. It is a long-overdue exhibition that reestablishes her place in the mid-century art world that was embracing modern art at the same time. Oct 6: First Friday at the Bennington Museum. We’re digging into the toy box to share our “Amazing Toys of Long Ago.” Children and adults can have fun exploring, learning about, and playing with the kinds of toys children played with in the 1850s to 1920s. We’ll meet you in the schoolhouse to play. Sept 22: Music at the Museum Presents Appalachian Harvest. Big Stone Gap is joined by Alyson Slack on fiddle and Aaron Pacitti on guitar to perform music from fiddle tunes to rock ’n’ roll. Thru Oct 9: 1863 Jane Stickle Quilt. The quilt that inspires quilters all over the world will be on its yearly display at the Bennington Museum. Sept 15: Stoneware collectors’ meeting. Nov 24-Dec 30: An Annual Festival: Time for the Holidays. This year the annual festival of the season celebrates the creativity of wide range of artists as they respond to the works of Nichols Goddard’s Musical Clock, c. 1810. Dec 16: Music at the Museum: An afternoon of holiday music with Taconic Chamber Players. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center 10 Vernon St., Brattleboro 11a to 5p (Closed Tues) http://www.brattleboromuseum.org, 802 257-0124 Thru Oct 8: Wolf Kahn: Density & Transparency. Kahn’s works are in the permanent collections of major museums around the world, including the Smithsonian American Art Museum; the Metropolitan Museum of Art; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the Whitney Museum of American Art; and the Brooklyn Museum. In January, Kahn was awarded the State Department’s International Medal of Arts. Thru Oct 8: Lost Porches: Nathalie Miebach. Miebach’s sculptures do much more than merely...

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Vermont Arts Council lands accomplished new director

Karen S. Mittelman is the new executive director of the Vermont Arts Council. Mittelman, previously director of the Division of Public Programs at the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) in Washington, D.C., brings to the Arts Council more than 30 years of experience in the public sector and in the the federal cultural arena. Beyond her work at NEH, Mittelman held a senior position at the National Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia, and served as curator at the Smithsonian Institution. Bob Stannard, chairman of the Arts Council, said all involved were thrilled that Mittelman accepted the executive director position. “In a time when federal arts funding is uncertain, it is vital to have an executive director who has significant experience in a national leadership role. Karen brings to this position the knowledge, expertise, and passion required to continue to advance arts and creativity in our state,” Stannard said. Mittelman also has close ties to Vermont, particularly Bennington County. “Since childhood, I’ve spent significant stretches of time kayaking on the Battenkill, skiing, walking, and exploring museums and historic sites,” Mittelman explained. “Vermont is a place that I love and feel deeply connected...

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Murals make the town
Sep26

Murals make the town

Cities and towns across the country are looking a little more colorful lately—and that’s not because of the changing seasons. Groups that aim to promote local talent and engage the community have been turning bare city walls and public buildings into huge public canvases. Brattleboro is in the planning stages to promote creative murals townwide. Some years ago, Bellows Falls created a welcoming mural for its downtown. Now the Rotary Club of the Deerfield Valley has engaged Chinon “Chichi” Maria, an artist, muralist, and former professional alpine skier, to return to her home in the Deerfield Valley to help spruce up one of the buildings left abandoned in the wake of Tropical Storm Irene. The club will auction off the murals when the building becomes occupied. Chichi also created murals in the windows at the Heritage Building in Wilmington with an assist from Twin Valley Elementary School students. An advocate of art education for children, Chichi regularly involves communities to be part of her murals to actively inspire youth through creativity. She has exhibited her work internationally, in galleries and on walls throughout North America and Europe. She launched Maven Murals, a full-service custom mural company, in...

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Brattleboro to speak out in $150K grant for ’Peoples, Places and History of Words

Senator Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), vice chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, has awarded Peoples, Places and History of Words in Brattleboro a $150,000 National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) matching grant. This was one of three highly competitive NEH grants received in Vermont. The two other recipients were the University of Vermont and the Vermont Farmers’ Market Education Center. According to project director Lissa Weinmann, landing the grant gives her project a leg up in securing additional resources “to illuminate and share the greater Brattleboro area’s rich but little-known history of words—in story, literature, publishing, and printing—to instill a greater pride of place for those who live, work, and raise families here, as well as to inform and inspire those who visit.” The project is a collaboration of four local groups: Marlboro College, the Brattleboro Literary Festival, the Brattleboro Historical Society, and Write Action. Jerry Carbone, former director of Brooks Memorial Library and a member of the Brattleboro Literary Festival Authors’ Committee, says the Brattleboro area “has an embarrassment of riches when it comes to its history of book publishing, printing, literature and the like, but few people who live here, much less outsiders, appreciate this history.” He said the project will bring these facts to the fore in an entertaining and creative way that aims to involve the whole community. To participate in a place-based “research pod,” or to join monthly project meetings, write...

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Next Stage lands $50K grant for storytelling

Next Stage Arts Project has received a $50,000 NEA grant, representing the entirety of NEA’s arts-based community development investment for Putney. The grant supports a collaborative project of Next Stage and the Town of Putney called “Legacy Putney: A Collaborative Celebration of Putney’s Arts History and Culture.” Partners include the Putney Historical Society, Putney Library, and area schools. The project has also received a $40,000 grant from the Fresh Sound Foundation and will seek an additional $10,000 in matching funds from the community. According to project organizers, “Legacy Putney” will entail a yearlong process of eliciting, crafting, and harnessing stories from residents and presenting them in a range of performance genres that are a hallmark of Next Stage. It’ll be literary, filmic, musical, historical, theatrical, visual, and movement-based. Presentations will be shared throughout the year, culminating in a two-week festival in May...

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Talk of the Arts: Thoughts of a man of a certain age
Sep26

Talk of the Arts: Thoughts of a man of a certain age

By Robert McBride So here we are, spinning around the sun, globally connected. I wonder whether the stress level is more or less than when our ancestors were worrying about the bison, climate change, an attack from a band of barbarians, and who their next leader might be. In the early 1960s, at the dinner table, my father would comment on U.S. politics and the economy, “It is the rise and fall of the Roman empire.” He’d often follow this up with the cryptic statement, “I had a little ball, I threw it against the wall and that was all.” My brothers and I would look at each other and just roll our eyes. Now at 66, older than my father was when he uttered his prophetic words, I feel that little ball in my hand. Last year, I heard a program on NPR on which a psychologist from Stanford University stated that when we are in our 60s and 70s that these are the happiest years of our lives not because we notice physical ailments, care for loved ones, or visit with death more frequently, but rather because we start to make decisions about what we want to do and how we want to spend our time. I know that I am tracking this. Although I am interested and engaged in a spectrum of stuff, I am learning to respond to requests as Melville’s Bartleby the scrivener so succinctly did: “I prefer not to.” The sand is running through the hourglass. At 45, when I started the Rockingham Arts and Museum Project (RAMP), there was a lot more sand at the top of my hourglass. At 66, with less above and more below, I want to spend time doing what matters to me: the arts, affordable housing, caregiving, sharing meals with friends, napping, working in the garden, and cleaning out that closet at home so someone else does not have to deal with it—and decidedly minimizing the amount of time that I spend sitting before a screen. This is not a withdrawal/denial response, but rather a sensible response of a mature adult looking at the present and, with a glance over his shoulder, looking to see who is following in his footsteps to relieve him of and to shoulder the burden of the future. There is an awful lot of connecting going on these days, and speedy connecting it is. But how much of it involves reflection? Perhaps reflection is a dated, Jane Austen kind of thing, when a letter (including sentences) being sent back and forth over days, weeks, months was considered speedy. I am sure the...

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Echoes of the Past: Abandoned Photography
Sep26

Echoes of the Past: Abandoned Photography

Linda Jane has photographed hundreds of abandoned places in more than a dozen states. Her images reveal the beauty of decay and the mystery of what people left behind. Many of the spaces rose and fell when handcrafting was valued. Heavy, carved doors, arched windows, stained glass, soaring ceilings, and forged fixtures remain after many years. She asks, “Why did businesses leave old ledgers and correspondence? Where are the students whose report cards are scattered on the classroom floor? Wasn’t it necessary to pass on the patient X-rays and medical records that are still in the file cabinets? Questions without answers.” Take the former Paper Service mill in her childhood hometown of Ashuelot, New Hampshire, her most recent focus. The mill was owned and operated by one family for more than 100 years, and survived many large storms, such as the hurricane of 1938. In 2005, flooding from Tropical Storm Tammy destroyed the mill, which had operated since 1883 (and around which the town grew). The owners of the Lower Robertson Dam in Ashuelot mishandled the situation, she says. The floodgates and the stop logs weren’t pulled. If the water had been redirected, it would have helped prevent water damage to the mill. Now the life of the mill, its demise, and its remains are the subject of Jane’s upcoming book, “Dark Waters: The Rise and Fall of Paper Service Ltd.,” which will be available late in 2017. For incredible images and more information, visit...

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