Riverledge

Riverledge Farm and Foundation By Katherine P. Cox   Photographs by Medora Hebert and Lynn Barrett “This is probably the most documented property in Southern Vermont,” mused Sidney Craven, founder and president of the Riverledge Foundation in Grafton. He was referring toRiverledge Farm, which has carefully been brought back as a working Vermont farm and is an outstanding representation of the Foundation’s mission. Established in 2009, the Foundation promotes historic preservation, conservation, forest and wildlife management and careful stewardship of those natural resources that reflect the character of Windham County and Southern Vermont. Perhaps more importantly, the Foundation works to connect people and non-profit organizations who share the same objectives to more effectively leverage the work they all do.   Among the Foundation’s partners are Vermont Land Trust, Vermont Center for Ecostudies, Vermont Woodlands Association, Vermont Coverts, Preservation Trust of Vermont and others. The farm and Foundation provide “a southern hub for these organizations to do research and network and still maintain the farm,” Craven said. The farm had been purchased in 2005 by the owners, who were exploring area towns to settle in and were quite taken by the property. “It had a hillside, trees, open meadows and a barn,” Craven said. The barn, built around 1820, had not been a working barn for 30 years, and while it was in fair condition, the owners did a complete renovation, maintaining its historic integrity and bringing it back to life. It was a major undertaking that included moving the structure off the original foundation, building a new foundation, opening up the inside of the massive space, and installing lighting, flooring, a kitchen and bathrooms. The work was all locally sourced, and some of the interior touches — the beautiful copper chandelier, the stunning Adirondack guide boat, two large trestle tables made from wood on the land — were crafted by artists in Southern Vermont. The Foundation and the other non-profit organizations host meetings and events there. The magnificent barn is the focal point of Riverledge Farm, which dates back to 1808, and is scrupulously maintained as an example of a typical working farm from that time. With over 300 acres of land, the property includes the main house and guest cabins, has miles of stone walls, some of which have been rebuilt, an apple orchard, a sugar house, nature trails and woodlands. Horse and sheep graze in the meadows and activities such as maple sugaring, beekeeping and haying continue the traditions of a typical farm of the 1800s. “We wanted to replicate the farm as it had been 200 years ago,” Craven said. “We don’t have cows or chickens, but as many activities as we...

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Riverledge

Riverledge Farm and Foundation By Katherine P. Cox   Photographs by Medora Hebert and Lynn Barrett “This is probably the most documented property in Southern Vermont,” mused Sidney Craven, founder and president of the Riverledge Foundation in Grafton. He was referring toRiverledge Farm, which has carefully been brought back as a working Vermont farm and is an outstanding representation of the Foundation’s mission. Established in 2009, the Foundation promotes historic preservation, conservation, forest and wildlife management and careful stewardship of those natural resources that reflect the character of Windham County and Southern Vermont. Perhaps more importantly, the Foundation works to connect people and non-profit organizations who share the same objectives to more effectively leverage the work they all do.   Among the Foundation’s partners are Vermont Land Trust, Vermont Center for Ecostudies, Vermont Woodlands Association, Vermont Coverts, Preservation Trust of Vermont and others. The farm and Foundation provide “a southern hub for these organizations to do research and network and still maintain the farm,” Craven said. The farm had been purchased in 2005 by the owners, who were exploring area towns to settle in and were quite taken by the property. “It had a hillside, trees, open meadows and a barn,” Craven said. The barn, built around 1820, had not been a working barn for 30 years, and while it was in fair condition, the owners did a complete renovation, maintaining its historic integrity and bringing it back to life. It was a major undertaking that included moving the structure off the original foundation, building a new foundation, opening up the inside of the massive space, and installing lighting, flooring, a kitchen and bathrooms. The work was all locally sourced, and some of the interior touches — the beautiful copper chandelier, the stunning Adirondack guide boat, two large trestle tables made from wood on the land — were crafted by artists in Southern Vermont. The Foundation and the other non-profit organizations host meetings and events there. The magnificent barn is the focal point of Riverledge Farm, which dates back to 1808, and is scrupulously maintained as an example of a typical working farm from that time. With over 300 acres of land, the property includes the main house and guest cabins, has miles of stone walls, some of which have been rebuilt, an apple orchard, a sugar house, nature trails and woodlands. Horse and sheep graze in the meadows and activities such as maple sugaring, beekeeping and haying continue the traditions of a typical farm of the 1800s. “We wanted to replicate the farm as it had been 200 years ago,” Craven said. “We don’t have cows or chickens, but as many activities as we...

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Pages 37-48

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Pages 37-48

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Pages 25-36

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Pages 25-36

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Pages 13-24

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Pages 1-12

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