Artspace
Sep05

Artspace

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In-Sight Photography
Sep04

In-Sight Photography

In-Sight Photography By Steve Noble One summer, 20 years ago, photographers Bill Ledger and John Willis saw something that bothered them. Teens in Brattleboro were just hanging out with nothing to do, and catching it from local police for loitering. Willis and Ledger decided to do something about it and put together a one-month photography class. It proved so popular , what they started quickly expanded from a one-month class to year-round offerings, and they built a darkroom in the Brattleboro Teen Center (now Boys and Girls Club) to handle the demand. “Everybody liked the idea so much it just grew,” said Willis, who still serves as the executive director of what is now the In-Sight Photography Project, a non-profit organization that offers photography classes to all youth ages 11-18, regardless of their ability to pay. This year, In-Sight celebrates its 20th anniversary and find itself with plenty to celebrate. In its two decades, In-Sight has served more than 1,500 participants, including roughly 200 in the past year alone, and has paid homage to them with exhibits and photo displays in its home on 45 Flat Street, where it moved a few years ago because it had outgrown its Teen Center space. In June, In-Sight received word that it had been nominated for the National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award, the nation’s highest honor for out-of-school programs for young people. Only 50 organizations are nominated each year, and In-Sight is just the second in Vermont ever to be recognized. “We’re very excited for our program to be recognized as a national model,” said In-Sight Director Stephen Dybas, who said In-Sight was chosen because its programs teach more than the technical aspects of photography. They teach life skills, foster creative expression and self-esteem and help kids prepare for success in larger arenas than just darkrooms. “There’s a lot more to it than just making a good photograph.” Over its 20 years, In-Sight has made collaboration a hallmark. It has partnered with dozens of area social service programs and nonprofit organizations, including the Brattleboro Retreat, Making the Most of I, the Women’s Crisis Center, Northeast Family Institute, Youth & Family Services and more. Its most notable collaborative venture is the Exposures program, a cross-cultural youth exchange program that is now a decade old. Exposures was borne out of Willis’ travels to the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota, that began about two decades ago. In what was once the poorest county in the U.S. and is still among the poorest, Willis found enrichment. “I’m just really drawn to the place and the people. People ask me why do I keep...

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Wine Observed
Sep03

Wine Observed

Wine Observed: This Time it’s Craft Beers by Marty Ramsburg   Ten years ago, in November 2002, a craft beer producer made the iconoclastic decision to package its first beer for distribution in a can. Demand for beer produced by the Oskar Blues brewpub in tiny Lyons, Colorado, had grown steadily, encouraging owner, Dale Katechis to expand production beyond what could be consumed on-premise. Releasing his Dale’s Pale Ale in cans, Oskar Blues launched what Katechis terms the “Canned Beer Apocolypse.” Until then, almost all craft producers used brown bottles, while cans were associated with characterless low-end, mass produced beer. Times have changed, with more and more craft brewers choosing cans over bottles. In fact, CraftCans.com contends that 184 breweries now can 556 different craft beers. Why? Simply put, those producers that have selected cans believe that, short of enjoying a draft beer at the source, cans deliver the freshest brew to the consumer. Ideally, when you enjoy a beer at home, the flavors you are tasting are those that the brew-meister intended. Three factors, however, may intervene between you and the brewery that can change those intended flavors: light, oxygen, and temperature. Cans control for the first two factors, while it is up to the breweries, distributors and retailers to control for the last. There is considerable debate among beer aficionados about the merits of cans v bottles. Zealots cite anecdotal evidence from blind tests with tasters sampling the same brew, one bottled and one canned, with cans coming out ahead. They have also staked the high ground environmentally, declaring cans “greener” than bottles. Enthusiasts point out that cans have a much higher recycling rate than bottles (55% for cans, only 28% for bottles) and that the recycled content for cans is much greater (68% for cans v 20%-30% for bottles). In addition, can proponents allege that the carbon footprint of cans is l ess since the energy associated with shipping the lightweight cans is much less than the energy used to distribute bottles. Lagunitas Brewing owner, Tony Magee, disagrees, swearing that Lagunitas (Petaluma, Ca.) will be “the last brewery in the US to use aluminum cans.” For Magee, the environmental hazards affiliated with mining and processing the bauxite ore from which  aluminum derives far outweigh the post-packaging environmental benefits. Magee acknowledges the carbon footprint associated with shipping costs, recently announcing that Lagunitas will open a brewery in Chicago to help reduce those. If, like many Vermonters, you consider yourself an environmentalist, you have some very good beer choices to match your values: drink draft beer at any of the local watering holes, especially a draft, and enjoy beer that...

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Calendar

The Daily Scoop September:Thru Sep 9: North Bennington Plein Air Competition, pleinair-vermont.com.Thru Sep 9: Vermont State Fair, all day, Rutland, vermontstatefair.net.Saturdays: Traditional Craft Saturdays at Billings Farm & Museum, 10a-5p, Woodstock, billingsfarm.org.6: Chinese Painting lecture, First Congregational Church, Manchester Center, 4p,visitmanchestervt.com.7: Gallery Walk in and around downtown Brattleboro, 5:30-8:30p, gallerywalk.org.8-9: Sheepdog Trial & Farm Festival, Merck Forest, Manchester, all day,visitmanchestervt.com.8: Look at it This Way, comedy skits, 7p, Cavendish Town Elementary School,yourplaceinvermont.com.8: Harvest Ball, benefit for SWVT Medical Center, 6p.9: Sundays on the Hill presents Erich Kory, cello solo, 4p, Church on the Hill, Weston, sundaysonthehill.org.11: California Wine Dinner at the Old Tavern restaurant, 4 course dinner paired with wine, reservations necessary, 6p, graftoninnvermont.com.12: Scott Ainslie performs at Jamaica Town Hall, 7p, cattailmusic.com.13: Jazz Night with Eugene Uman Trio, Vermont Institute of Contemporary Arts, Chester, 8p, yourplaceinvermont.com.14-16: Bennington’s 46th Annual Car Show, all day, bennington.com.14: Fall Foliage Golf Classic, 1p, Mount Snow Golf Course, visitvermont.com.15: Discover Dorset Fall Festival, all day, dorsetvt.com.15: Car Show Cruise-In at Center Stage, Main St, Bennington, 6p,betterbennington.com.15: Scott Ainslie performs in Jamaica, VT, 7p, jamaicavt.com.15: Southern Vermont Homebrew / Microbrew Festival, 12-4p, Bennington,betterbennington.com.15: Readsboro Arts Festival, 10a-4p, Readsboro Central School, readsboroarts.org.15-16: Bromley Thrill Festival Weekend, bromley.com.15-16: 19th Annual Bennington Quiltfest, all day, benningtonquiltfest.com.20: Bennington Museum’s ABS’s, 1:30p, benningtonmuseum.org.21: Third Friday Art Walk, in and around Bellows Falls, bf3f.org.21-23: Vermont Life Wine and Harvest festival, all day, Mount Snow, West Dover,mountsnow.com.22: 30th Peru Fair, 9a-4p, with pig roast, art, crafts, music and more, perufair.org.22-23: Chester Fall Festival, 10a-4p, Chester Village Green, chesterfallfestival.org.22: Plymouth Cheese & Harvest Festival, all day, President Calvin Coolidge State Historic Site, historicsites.vermont.gov/Coolidge.28-3028-3028-30: Manchester Fall Art and Craft Festival, all day, craftproducers.com.28-30: Fall Rummage Sale at Fletcher Farm School, 10a-4p, Ludlow,fletcherfarm.org.29: An Evening with Tom Rush, Bennington, 8p, thebennington.org.29: Dover Day, family fun and games, 10a-2p, Dover School, visitvermont.com.29: Ballads of the Real West, with Skip Gorman and Connie Dover, 7p, Ludlow Town Hall, yourplaceinvermont.com.29: SEVCA’s 14th Annual Flea market, Silent Auction and Raffle fundraiser, 9a, Westminster, sevca.org.29-30: Vermont Fine Furniture and Woodworking Festival, all day, Woodstock,vermontwoodfestival.org.29-30: Brattleboro West Arts Open Studio Tour, 10a-5p, West Brattleboro, Brattleboro-west-arts.com.29-30: Billings Farm & Museum Pumpkin & Apple Celebration, at Billings Farm, Woodstock, billingsfarm.org.29-30: Annual Fairy House Tour, Nature Museum at Grafton, 11a-4p, nature-museum.org.30-Nov 1: 51st Annual Weston Antiques Show, all day,visitmanchestervt.com.30: Vermont Dining Trail, Amtrak leaves from Rutland, 5p, vermontdiningtrain.com.October:All month: Manchester Center “Revolutionary War and Fall Foliage Tours,backroddiscovery.com.Thru Oct 28: 14 artists, featuring 60 works from Vt., N.H. and Mass. artists, in bronze, wood, steel, granite and ceramic, Cider Hill Gardens, Windsor, ciderhillgardens.com.Wednesdays: Wine and Cheese Hike at Grafton Ponds, Grafton, 2p,graftonponds.com.2-8: Big Buzz Chainsaw Carving Festival, all day, Chester, 508 965-3211.4-7: Vermont Antiques Weekend, events all day, westonantiquesshow.org.5: Gallery Walk in and around downtown Brattleboro, 5:30-8:30p, gallerywalk.org.5-7: Weston Antiques Show, all day, Weston, westonantiquesshow.org.5-7: Okemo Antiques...

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Music & Theatre

Music & Theater Bellows Falls Opera House7 Centennial Square, Rockinghambfoperahouse.com,802 463-3964Sep 6: Gordie Tentrees, 7:30p. Sep 23: Puppets in the Green Mountains performance, Peter and the Wolf, 8p. Sep 28: Made in Vermont Music Festival Statewide Tour, 7:30p. Bennington Center for the Arts44 Gypsy Lane, Bennington10a–5p, (Closed Mondays)benningtoncenterforthearts.org802 442-7158Sep 29: An Evening with Tom Rush, 8p. Brattleboro Music Center38 Walnut Street, Brattleborobmcvt.org, 802 257-4523Sep 17: Windham Orchestra Open Rehersal, 7:30p, at River Garden, Brattleboro. Oct 7: Blanche Moyse Memorial Concert, 7:30p, at Persons Hall, Marlboro College. Oct 27: Chamber Series: Musicians from Marlboro, 7:30p, Centre Congregational Church, Brattleboro. Nov 4: Music School Faculty Recital, 3p, Centre Congregational Church, Brattleboro. Nov 16: Windham Orchestra, 7:30p, Vermont Academy, Saxtons River. Nov 18: Windham Orchestra, 3p, Latchis Theater. Dec 9: BMC Chamber Music Series: Laredo, Robinson, Tenenbom & Hochman, 3p, Centre Congregational Church, Brattleboro. The Dorset PlayersPO Box 521, Dorsetdorsetplayers.org802 867-5111Oct 5-7 & 12-13: The Great American Trailer Park musical, 7:30p, Oct 14 at 3p. Oct 27: La Boheme, 8p. Nov 3: Vermont Reads – Reading of Bull Run, 7:30p. Nov 30, Dec 7: Children’s Holiday special, Dec 1-2 & 8-9, 2p. Latchis Theatre50 Main St, Brattleborolatchis.com, 802 254-6300Sep 22: Puppets in the Green Mountains performance, Peter and the Wolf, 3p. Sep 30: Puppets in the Green Mountains performance, Memories of a Circus Tiger, 11a & 3p. Nov 18: Windham Orchestra Opening Concert, 3 & 7p. Ongoing: The Metropolitan Opera HD Live, visit latchis.com for full details. New England Center for the Circus Arts76 Cotton Mill Hill #300, Brattleboronecenterforcircusarts.org802 254-9780Sep 8: Open House, 2-4p. Oct 7: Flying Trapeze Show, 4-5p, rain date Oct 14. Dec 1: Recital, 4-5p. Dec 14-16: The Flying Nut, annual holiday show. New England Youth Theater100 Flat St, Brattleboroneyt.org, 802 246-NEYT (6398)Sep 22 & 30: Puppets in the Green Mountains performance, D-Generation, 8p. Sep 27-28: Puppets in the Green Mountains performance, Black Birds of Bialystok, 7p Thur, 8p Fri. Sep 29: Puppets in the Green Mountains performance, Scenes from a Tree, 11a & 3p. Oct 11-21: Romeo & Juliet, directed by Peter Gould. Nov 2-11: The Fantastic Mr. Fox, directed by Jane Baker. Dec 6-16: Annie, directed by Rebecca Waxman. Oldcastle Theatre Company44 Gypsy Land, Benningtonoldcastletheatre.org, 802 447-0564Thru Nov: Shows include You Can’t Take it With You, Northern Boulevard, Grandma Moses: An American Primitive, Around the World in 80 Days, The Fox on the Fairway, Doubt and Other People’s Money, see website for schedule.The Old Tavern at Grafton92 Main St, Grafton802 843-2231, oldtavern.comSep 22: Easy Street, swing, bluegrass, jazz, rockabilly, 8p. Sep 29: Spike Dogtooth, bluegrass, Irish, traditional and originals, 8p. Oct 6: Hungrytown, jazz, blues duo of Ken Anderson and...

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At the Galleries

At the Galleries Ann Coleman Gallery437 Maple Dr, Whitingham, 10a–5p dailyartistanncoleman.com, 802 378-7090Ongoing: Ann Coleman’s watercolors inspired by nature and the outdoors of New England can be viewed at Quahog Design, Quaigh Designs, 11 W Main St, Wilmington. Asian Cultural Center of Vermont and C.X. Silver Gallery814 Western Ave, Brattleboroaccvt.org, 802 257-7898, ext 12nd Sun each month: Cai’s Dim Sum Teahouse, featuring over 30 unique authentic dishes with vegetarian wheat-free and gluten-free options and an emphasis on local ingredients. Ongoing: Kiri-e: Fabric collage pictures by young women survivors of the Hiroshima aftermath. The Asian Cultural Center of Vermont is an educational resources agency dedicated to connecting people through the arts and cultures of Asia. These connections come through festivals, films, forums, exhibitions, presentations, and other community learning/sharing opportunities. Bennington Arts Guild103 South St, Benningtonbenningtonartsguild.org802 442-7838Thru Oct 1: Judith Kniffin oils and watercolors, and Paula LaPorte, weaving. Sep 15: Artist demonstrations. Oct 6-Nov 19: Dan Barber, rug hooking, and Colleen Williams, ceramics, opening Oct. 6, 5p. Oct 27: Artist demonstrations. Nov 24: Hometown Holiday cocoa and cookies.Dec 2: Open house, 10a–4p. Catherine Dianich Gallery139 Main St, BrattleboroOpen by appointment onlycatherinedianichgallery.com802 380-1607Fall exhibit: The artwork of Alisa Dworsky, sculptures of crocheted rope, intaglio prints, graphite and charcoal drawings and large-scale public installations. Chaffee Art Center16 South Main St, Rutlandchaffeeartcenter.org802 775-0356Thru Sep 29: Annual Full House Exhibit, featuring selected juried members. Oct 5-Nov 2: Fifth Annual Photography Contest. Oct 6-7: Fall Foliage Art in the Park. Oct 21: Hats off to the Chaffee, dinner and auction featuring Hats. Nov 6-10: Art “Can” Do it, sculpture contest using canned foods. Nov 16-Dec 31: Winter All Members Show. Cider Hill Gardens1747 Hunt Rd, Windsorciderhillvt.com, 802 674-6825Open Thur-Sun 10a–6p thru Oct,Fri-Sun 10a–5p thru DecFeaturing Gary Milek’s award winning paintings and prints inspired by the surrounding gardens and scenery. These timeless floral still-life’s and landscapes capture the magic of the Vermont countryside. Crow Hill Gallery729 Flamstead Rd, Chestercrowhillgallery.com802 875-3763Nestled in the woods among outdoor sculptures, the gallery offers a beautiful variety of viewing spaces. Here one can view in contemplative elegance a large selection of Jeanne’s most recent works, as well as the sculpture of visiting artists. Epoch Gallery4927 Main St, Manchesterepochvermont.com, 802 768-9711A coopertaive art and craft gallery, featuring 18 of Vermont’s finest artisans working in a variety of disciplines. Each day the gallery is staffed by one of the artisan members offering their unique view of the creative process. Gallery 1037 Pineview Drive, Chestergallery103.com, 802 875-7400Ongoing: Featuring fine American Craft, this art space is filled with the handmade craft of more than 100 Vermont and New England artists. Featuring photography, jewelry, ironwork, textiles, blown...

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At the Museums
Sep03

At the Museums

At the Museums Bennington Center for the Arts44 Gypsy Lane, Bennington10a–5p, (Closed Mondays)benningtoncenterforthearts.org802 442-7158Thru Sep 9: Impression of New England, including over 60 scenes in paint and bronze. Thru Sep 23: California Art Club7–Saving Paradise: The Symbiosis of Landscape Painting & Environmental Awareness. Thru Sep 23: The Laumeister Fine Art Competition, juried by Scott Christensen. Sep 29-Oct 27: Oil Painter of American Eastern Regional Exhibition. Bennington Museum75 Main St, Rte. 9, Bennington10a–5p (Closed Wednesdays)benningtonmuseum.org,802 477-1571Sep 11-Oct 21: 1863 Jane Stickle Quilt on View, come see the “quilt that inspires quilters.” Sep 20: Museum “ABC’s”, focusing on the paintings of Rockwell Kent. Sep 29: Sixth Annual Southern Vermont Homebrew Competition and Festival. Thru Oct 30: Rockwell Kent’s “Egypt”: Shadow and Light in Vermont. Includes paintings from the Whitney Museum of American Art and several private collections, as well as drawings and prints not seen publicly in generations.Nov 24: Festival of Trees kick off with Family Day. Dec 8: Around the World gala. Dec 21: Afterglow Holiday Dance Party. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center10 Vernon St, Brattleboro11a–5p (closed Tuesdays)brattleboromuseum.org, 802 257-0124Thru Oct 21: Gathering Light: The Art of Stephen Hannock. Thru Oct 21: Making is Knowing: The Art of Ric Campman. Thru Oct 21: Vermont Collects: Selections from the Heller Family. Thru Oct 21: Woodstack, featuring  John Gerding’screative wood stacks along his country road.Sep 2: Hidden in the Hills: Kafka Gardens, trip to see hidden and unusual  artist studios, open to BMAC members only. Sept 16: Exhibit Tour with Chief Curator Mara Williams, 1p. Sept 20: Waysin Words: An Evening of Poetry & Film inspired by Ric Campman, 7:30p. Sep 21: Cai’s Dim Sum Teahouse at BMAC, 5:30-8p. Sep 23, 26 & 30:Of Bread and Paper, puppet theater from Sandglass Theater’s Puppets in the Green Mountains, 5:30p Sept 23 and 30, 7:30p Sept 26. Sep 26: Puppets, Masks, and Performing Objects in Therapeutic Puppetry, talk by Matthew Bernier. Sep 28: Stephen Hannock: Painted VistaVisions, lecture by art historian Jason Rosenfeld. Oct 19: Cai’s Dim Sum Teahouse at BMAC, 5:30-8p. Oct 26-28: Fifth Annual Lego Contest & Exhibit, people of all ages welcome to design/build an original Lego structure. Nov 2: Opening of new exhibits, The New England Biennial, 5:30-8:30p. The Clark Art Institute225 South St, Williamstown, Mass10a–5p Tuesday thru Sundayclarkart.edu, 413 458-2303Thru 2014: Clark Remix: Paintings, sculptures and more from the permanent collection. Thru Sep 16: Through Shen-kan: Sterling Clark in China. Thru Sep 16: Then & Now: Photographs of Northern China. Thru Sep 23: In London: From Paris, a Taste for Impressionism: Paintings from the Clark. Thru Oct 21: Unearthed: Recent Archaeological Discoveries from Northern China. American Museum of Fly Fishing4104 Main...

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Spotlights

Spotlights Puppets in the Green MountainsSept 22-30, http://www.puppetsinthegreenmountains.com The Puppets in the Green Mountains Festival is an international puppet festival held every other year in Southern Vermont.  Produced and Presented by Vermont’s Sandglass Theater, it is a wellspring of creativity, this year presenting companies from Japan, Israel, Turkey, Spain, Poland, Finland, Quebec, and the US. 9th Annual Empty Bowls Benefit DinnerSaturday, October 6, two seatings, 5 & 6:30p, Landmark College, Putney. $25 donation, brattleboroclayworks.comSince 1988 The Brattleboro Area Drop In Center has provided provided food, shelter and other essential resources to those in need, in Brattleboro and many surrounding towns. The recent death of the organization’s founder and director, Melinda Bussino, left many in the community reeling, though the Drop In Center’s vital services have continued uninterrupted.Tthe Empty Bowls dinner will be dedicated to the memory of Melinda and her tireless efforts on behalf of those in need. Guests will be served a simple, nutritious meal of soup, bread, cheese, apples, beverage, and dessert, and will enjoy live music. Afterwards, guests are invited to keep the bowl from which they ate as a reminder of the many people who go hungry each day in our community and beyond. Empty Bowls is made possible by dozens of volunteers ranging from ceramic artists who begin making bowls early in the summer, to high school students who help serve and clean up on the night of the dinner. Area businesses and restaurants contribute food, beverages, desserts and supplies, and local professional musicians provide entertainment. The dinner is sponsored by Brattleboro Clayworks (a potters’ cooperative and ceramics resource center) and Landmark College, which hosts the dinner, as well as Brattleboro Savings & Loan, among others. All proceeds are donated to the Brattleboro Area Drop In Center. Circus Coming to Town! RUCKUS: A Cirque Spectacular Oct 6-; 3&7p, Barre Opera House, 802 476-8188, http://www.barreoperahouse.orgThe show is a stunning display of circus arts featuring an ensemble cast of trapezists, jugglers, contortionists and more!  Inspired by the fun of old vaudeville shows, and featuring an award winning cast whose resumes include Cirque du Soleil, Ringling Bros., Cirque Eloize and the Big Apple Circus, this is a show that is perfect for the entire family and special enough for a date night out! The show is uniquely presented on a free-standing aerial rig, so these performers are able to bring their international level ‘cirque’ talent to smaller stages that wouldn’t normally be able to host such high flying entertainment. Flying Nut December 14-16, “Flying Nut” Circus Shows, New England Center for Circus Arts, Brattleboro, http://www.necenterforcircusarts.orgThe annual holiday show from Brattleboro’s New England Center for Circus Arts featuring advanced youth and...

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Fall Food Festivals
Sep03

Fall Food Festivals

Fall Food Festivals NO TASTE OF DEERFIELD VALLEY THIS YEAR!!! Vermont Life Wine& Harvest FestivalSep 21-23, with events in downtown Wilmington, local inns, farms and wineries, and at nearby Mount Snow in West Dover,thevermontfestival.comA weekend showcase for Vermont wines, Vermont specialty foods and artisans of all types celebrating the rich uniqueness, quality and ingenuity of Vermont producers. Named one of Vermont’s “Top 10 Fall Events” by the Vermont Chamber of Commerce and “Top 100 National Event” by the American Bus Association. Heirloom Apple Tasting DayOct 6-8, tastings at 10, 12 and 2p,The Scott Farm, 707 Kipling Rd, Dummerston, 802 254-6868,scottfarmvermont.comA celebration of heirloom apples, fresh, baked and squeezed. Free tastings and history of Scott Farm’s 70 apple varieties with wonderful names such as Esopus Spitzenburg and Ananas Reinette. Apples will be on sale after the tastings. 4th Annual Grape StompOct 7, 11:30-5p,Honora Winery Tasting Room, Jacksonville,honorawinery.comIt’s harvest time and what better way to celebrate than stompin’ grapes? Come on down and jump into a barrel full of grapes and give them your best STOMP! Listen and dance to music provided by CK Acoustics from 12-4p, grab a bite and enjoy some wine and hot apple cider! Children and the young at heart will all have a great time. Other activities include a pumpkin decorating station and hay pile jump. Dummerston’s Annual Apple Pie FestivalOct 7, 10:30-4p, Evening Star Grange Hall,1006 East-West Rd, Dummerston, 802 254-9158Enjoy homemade apple pie-sold whole or bythe piece, Vermont cheddar cheese, sweet apple cider, doughnuts made right on the spot, ice cream, coffee, books, exotic international crafts, handcrafts and vintage treasures galore. This little festival is a Dummerston tradition showing the grassroots nature of southern Vermont, with a bit of a sweet tooth thrown in.10th AnnualGilfeather Turnip FestivalOct 27, 10-3p, WardsboroTown Hall, Main St (Rt 100),friendsofwardsborolibrary.orgJoin the whole town as we celebrate our town’s  delicious roots. An entire family-oriented day dedicated entirely to one of Vermont’s tastiest heirloom vegetables, first propagated in Wardsboro in the early 1900s by local farmer, John Gilfeather. Live music, entertainment, activities for children. The Turnip Café serves turnip soup and Turnip Tastings (nominal fee) of recipes created and prepared by Wardsboro “chefs.” Shop at the Turnip Boutique and the craft fair, and farmers’ market for turnip-theme gifts, souvenir t-shirts, turnip movie on VHS cassette and DVD, The Gil-feather Turnip Cookbook, turnips and seeds, apples, cider, organic veggies, breads, honey, Vermont products, specialty foods and local arts and crafts. Proceeds benefit the Friends of the Wardsboro Library. Pumpkin Festivals: 20th Annual Keene Pumpkin FestivalOct 20, 12-8:30p, Main St, Keene, NH, pumpkinfestival.org 7th Annual Pumpkin Carving FestivalMid-Oct, Equinox Valley Nursery, Rt 7A, south of Manchester,manchestervermont.net...

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Farmers Markets
Sep03

Farmers Markets

Farmers’ Markets ***Most Farmers’ Markets in Vermont close by the end of October.*** Every Tuesday: Rutland Downtown Farmers’ Market, Depot Park, 3-6p, 802 747-4403. Bennington Walloomsac Farmers’ Market at the Bennington Station, 10a-1p, 802 442-8934. Woodstock Farmers’ Market, on the Green, 3-6p, woodstockvt.com. Every Wednesday: Brattleboro Farmers’ Market, Gibson-Aiken Center, Brattleboro, 10a-2p, brattleborofarmersmarket.org. Every Thursday: Poultney Farmers’ Market, Main Street, 9a-2p, 802 287-2460. Townshend Farmers Market, intersection of routes 30 and 35, 3:30-6:30p, 802 869-2141. Manchester Farmers’ Market, Adams Park, Manchester, 3-6p, manchestermarket.org. Castleton Village Farmers’ Market, next to Citizen’s Bank, Wells, 3:30-6p, 802 273-2241. Royalton Farmers’ Market, South Royalton Town Green, 3-6:30p, 802 763-6630. Every Friday: Brandon Farmers’ Market, Central Park, Brandon, 9a-2p, 802 247-8473. Fairhaven Farmers’ Market, The Park, 3-7p, 802 265-4240. Ludlow Farmers’ Market, 4-7p, Main Street, 802 734-3829. Hartland Farmers’ Market, Hartland Town Library, 4-7p, 802 296-2032. Every Saturday: Brattleboro Farmers’ Market, Western Avenue (just west of Creamery Covered Bridge), Brattleboro, 9a – 2p, brattleborofarmersmarket.org. Arlington Country Market, at the Hamlets of Vermont on Route 7A North, Arlington, 10a-2p,arlingtoncountrymarket.com. Norwich Farmers’ Market, Route 5 south in Norwich, 9a-1p, norwichfarmersmarket.org. Bennington Walloomsac Farmers’ Market at the Bennington Station, 10a-1p, 802 442-8934. Londonderry – West River Farmers’ Market, routes 11 and 100, 9a-1p, 802 824-4492. Rutland Downtown Farmers’ Market, Depot Park, 9a-2p, 802 747-4403. Wilmington Farmers’ Market, Main Street, Wilmington, 10a-3p, 802 464-9069. Windsor Farmers’ Market, on Green St., Windsor, 1-4p, 802 674-6630. Woodstock – Mt. Tom Farmers’ Market, Mt. Tom Parking Lot, 9:30a-12:30p, 802 457-1980. Green Mountain Harmony Farm, Flea, Arts and Crafts market, on Route 7 South in Mount Tabor, 9a-1p,greenmountainharmony.com. Every Sunday: Jamaica Farmers’ Market, Main Street, Jamaica, 10a-2p, jamaicavt.com, 802 874-4151. Arlington Country Market, at the Hamlets of Vermont on Route 7A North, Arlington, 10a-2p,arlingtoncountrymarket.com. Chester Farmers’ Market, at Zachary’s Pizza House, 11am-2pm, 802 875-2703. Dorset Farmers’ Market at HN Williams Store, 10am-2pm, 802 558-8511. Green Mountain Harmony Farm, Flea, Arts and Crafts market, on Route 7 South in Mount Tabor,...

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Community Supported Restaurants
Sep03

Community Supported Restaurants

Community Supported Restaurants: The Gleanery in Putney and Popolo in Bellows Falls By Katherine P. Cox   Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) has become an ingrained part of our culture as more and more people embrace the notion of supporting local farmers and buying fresh, healthy, local food.  Now an intrepid group in Putney has applied that model to its new restaurant, The Gleanery, scheduled to open in October. Likewise, a trio in Bellows Falls had adapted the community support concept at its restaurant, Popolo, in the former Windham Hotel. The financing models are slightly different, as are the cuisines, but the spirit behind the enterprises is the same: a restaurant in which local citizens have not just a financial investment, but an emotional connection as well. It’s taking the local movement to another level, boosting the area economies by hiring local employees, working with regional farms to provide them a consistent source of revenue, using area vendors and tradespeople, and providing diners an opportunity to support a local enterprise. At Popolo, which opened in May, the idea was hatched in February 2011 by Gary Smith, Kristen Fehrenbach and John-Michael Maciejewski, the three directors. Smith, a music producer experienced in “putting things together,” as he says, assumed the role of general manager; Fehrenbach, with decades of experience in restaurants, is the front-of-house manager; and Maciejewski is the chef. Combining their talents, they drew up an 80-page prospectus and sought out investors. “Investment was by invitation only,” Smith says, “and we built a like-minded team through a combination of cold hard facts about the reality of restaurant investment and a well-researched analysis of dining opportunities and audience in our region.” Shares were $500 each and a minimum commitment of 10 shares was required to participate. There are currently 25 stockholders, with the three directors controlling more than half of the shares. “People who believed this was a good idea for our region put their money where their mouths are and raised a few hundred thousand dollars to see it through. Consequently, we started without debt and are not beholden to lenders,” Smith says. The folks behind The Gleanery – Elizabeth Ehrenberg, Ismail Samad and Alice James – chose a different approach to raising money that included their own equity, membership shares, traded skills (such as financial advice, architectural design, and carpentry), individual gifts and a $5,000 award from the annual Strolling of the Heifers and the Brattleboro Development Credit Corporation business plan competition. “People are excited about the concept, especially one that is committed to working with local communities,” says Ehrenberg, a Putney native. People get to invest in their own...

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Putney Craft Tour
Sep03

Putney Craft Tour

Thanksgiving Weekend: On Putney, Vermont’s Artisan Trail By Katherine P. Cox Liz Hawkes deNiord, a painter and ceramic artist from Putney, says to expect the usual and the unusual when you visit her studio on the 34th annual Putney Craft Tour in November. She could be talking about the tour itself, whose organizers are always striving to add something new and different to the venerable arts tour. Twenty-eight artists and craftspeople, including some new to the tour or returning after absences, will open their studios to the public Nov. 23-25. A new feature this year is the welcome center at The Putney Inn, where visitors can stop to get maps, directions and to view the participating artists’ work, which will be on exhibit at the Inn. Weaver Dena Gartenstein Moses, an organizer who has been part of the tour for many years, says, “We have over 25 artists participating and realize that even if someone takes the whole weekend, it will be hard for them to see and do everything.”  Veteran tour-goers, she says, “often have their favorites, but we wanted to give new participants an easy way to get a sense of what is being made and shown on the different stops to help them decide how to plan their time.” There will be someone on hand to provide information about the tour, the artists and about Putney and places to stay and dine. Maps, coffee and restrooms will be available for those looking for a rest stop or a meeting place. Every artisan on the tour will have at least one piece exhibited at the inn, a preview of what’s in store at the studios. As always, the annual Putney Craft Tour, held during the long Thanksgiving weekend, gives shoppers, visitors and collectors another reason to be thankful. Blacksmiths, glass blowers, potters, jewelers, weavers, woodworkers – even artisan cheesemakers –invite visitors to come in, discover, ask questions, sip hot cider and find that one-of-a-kind gift, for themselves or others. Part of the fun is meandering through the beautiful Vermont countryside, following the map to find these prominent craftspeople and view the works where they are conceived and created; in some cases, the settings showcase how to incorporate original pieces into a home. Expect the strange, the elegant, funky and unusual, says Liz Hawkes deNiord.  A potter and painter, she will have pots that carry three-dimensional paintings.  Also in her studio will be candelabras, goblets, unusual vases, tiny, medium and large “painted” bowls, covered boxes, mugs, expresso sets, plates, coolers, pitchers, and hand-carved stoppers for vessels. “I also make sculptural installations, painted textured clay wall pieces and pots...

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