Bobby Gosh

Bobby Gosh by Joyce Marcel People are collectors by instinct. Children collect bottle caps, baseball trading cards and dolls. Adults collect everything from guns to antiques to wine. There’s even a whole category called ”collectibles,” which is so wide it includes 1930s kitchenware as well as ancient woodworking tools and ceramic planters. Pretty much everyone collects something. Bobby Gosh by Joyce Marcel People are collectors by instinct.    Children collect bottle caps, baseball trading cards and dolls. Adults collect everything from guns to antiques to wine. There’s even a whole category called ”collectibles,” which is so wide it includes 1930s kitchenware as well as ancient woodworking tools and ceramic planters. Pretty much everyone collects something. And some people — lucky people — collect art. Here in Vermont, despite the state’s small size, the quality of the art that graces people’s walls is surprisingly high. Mara Williams, curator of the Brattleboro Museum and Art Center, recently mounted a show called ”Vermont Collects: Modern & Contemporary Masters” that includes work by Jim Dine, Wolf Kahn, Jules Olitski, Julian Schnabel, Sol LeWitt and Robert Rauschen-berg. It’s surprising how much wonderful art is living in our woods. When it comes to collecting art, there are no set rules, according to Williams. Most people simply buy the things they love. ”There’s an object that somehow sparks your imagination, which sparks passion in you, so you’re passionate about it,” she said. ”There are people who buy out of their coolly reductive intellectual side. Some collect one or two artists that they adore, or one or two styles. Some collect only artists they know. Some are relatives of the artists they collect. Collectors who would make it into the Art in America Top 200 Collectors in America are collecting in an incredibly focused and disciplined way, whereas most people who buy art are rather, ‘Oh, I love that.”’ Bobby Gosh, 73, of Brookfield , is an ”Oh, I love that” kind of collector. Gosh, a tall, forceful, energetic man with a bald head that’s been clean shaven for decades, has had a long and successful career as a rock and pop performer, conductor and songwriter. He once opened for Barbra Streisand in front of 250,000 people in Central Park. He wrote the international hit ”A Little Bit More,” which has been recorded by over 60 artists. He was Paul Anka’s road conductor for two years. He’s worked with Frank Sinatra and Sammy Cahn. He’s written over 200 radio and television commercials. Since 1971, he and his wife, Billi Gosh, a major force in the Democratic Party on the national, state and local levels, as well as a founder...

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