Calendar
Mar04

Calendar

Calendar At the Museums Bennington Center for the Arts 44 Gypsy Lane, Bennington⌦10am to 5pm, Tues.-Sun. (Closed Mondays) benningtoncenterforthearts.org. 802 442-7158Ongoing: Discover the history and legends of Vermont’s covered bridges in the world’s only museum dedicated to their preservation. Explore the exhibits on engineering, construction, tools, and creators. Bennington Museum 75 Main Street, Rte. 9, Bennington⌦10am to 5pm (Closed Wednesdays) benningtonmuseum.org, 802 477-1571Feb. 1-April 25: “Vermont Impressions.” Drawn from the museum’s permanent collection, this exhibition will feature paintings in the impressionist vein dating largely from 1900-1950, including work by artists such as Clifford A Bayard, Horace Brown, Edwin B. Child and more. ■ May 22-Oct. 31: “State of Craft.” State of Craft is a landmark exhibition examining the evolution of the contemporary studio craft movement in Vermont. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center 10 Vernon Street, Brattleboro 11am to 5pm (Closed Tuesdays) brattleboromuseum.org, 802 257-0124Through Feb. 21: Drawing Itself: A Survey of Contemporary Practice. Drawing Itself offers viewers the rare pleasure of exploring the frequently overlooked art form of drawing. ■ Back Through Black: Marcy Hermansader. Hermansader has constructed a series of collages inspired by and about darkness, giving us much to ponder: darkness as protective but menacing, providing cover but full of dangers. ■ Eric Aho: Ice Box. Aho’s work is a perfect synthesis of abstraction and representation, the general and the particular, process and memory. It is both original and a précis of contemporary and art historical influences. ■ Bill Long: Through The View. Bill Long’s illustrated book Through the View consists of a series of 32 colorful oil paintings that explore the idea of careful observation — with regard not only to what we as viewers see, but also to what the characters that “people” the pictures are looking at. ■  Joseph Fichter: Clarion Call. Joseph Fichter’s horse sculptures are more than descriptions of living animals: they are dynamic depictions of energy in motion. ■ March 28–July 11: Oblique, Acute and Sidelong. Group exhibit including works by Subhankar Banerjee, Maya Gold, Yvonne Jaquet and David Kapp. Curated by Mara Williams, BMAC chief curator. ■  Egg Tempera: Contemporary Masters. Includes work by Koo Shadler, Doug Safranek, ■ Altoon Sultan, Robert Vickrey, George Tooker, Suzanne Scherer & Pavel Ouporov, Fred Wessel and Robert Paul Saphier. Curated by Susan Calabria, BMAC educational curator ■  Cecily Kahn: Call and Response. Curated by Mara Williams. ■ The City of Salt: Nicholas Kahn & Richard Selesnck. Curated by Susan Calabria. ■ Symmetries: Ellen Dorn Levitt. Curated by Susan Calabria. The Clark ■ 225 South Street, Williamstown, Mass.⌦10am to 5pm Tuesday through Sunday clark.edu, 413 458-2303 Thru April 11: Material Witnesses: Photographs of Things....

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A Touch of Paris
Mar04

A Touch of Paris

A Touch of Paris Close to Home The Hermitage Inn is already renowned for its 40,000-plus-bottle wine cellar and award-winning menu, as well as outdoor offerings of cross-country skiing, ice skating, snowshoeing, fly fishing and more, depending on the season. But the inn is one-of-a-kind in the world of fine art and collectibles—one of the most complete collections of the celebrated French artist Michel Delacroix—a French original—an acclaimed master of the naïf tradition, and one of the most popular artists in the world today.  Some might even call it a Delacroix museum. Recently, Southern Vermont Arts & Living’s publisher and art director attended an evening filled with art, food and wine at The Hermitage Inn as part of a special celebration to meet the artist in person. Nearly 100 patrons from all over New England enjoyed a wonderful five-course gourmet meal with the most exquisite wine pairings and had the opportunity to purchase original pieces that adorned the walls. Guests also received a one-color, numbered serigraph featuring The Hermitage Inn, signed by the artist. A self-styled “painter of dreams and of the poetic past,” Delacroix has devoted five decades to painting a city he calls “the Paris of then” — the place where he was born, where he spent his boyhood. These works, renowned for their graceful balance of “the earthy and the urban, the cosmic and the ordinary,” have captivated private collectors, museums and ordinary people alike throughout the world, earning the artist both universal acclaim and numerous awards. In the U.S. alone, Delacroix’s work has been featured in over 300 solo exhibitions from New York, Boston and Washington, to Los Angeles, San Francisco and Seattle. Abroad, his work has been exhibited throughout Europe and Japan, and forms part of the permanent collections of the Musée International d’Art Naïf and the Fondation Max Fourny in Paris — and of private collections around the globe. Delacroix is still producing new, original paintings for his solo exhibitions world wide. Innkeeper Steven O’Hern says that Delacroix will return for another special evening. This is an event not to miss. (Learn more at...

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What’s New

What’s New Women’s Film Festival, 2010 In recent years the light at the end of winter’s long tunnel has been aided immeasurably by silver screens being lit up around Brattleboro with films from the Women’s Film Festival. Beginning March 12th and continuing through March 21st, the 2010 festival will again usher in Springtime for the tri-state region with films that entertain, enlighten, and challenge.Many international award-winning features and shorter documentaries are included in the roster, culled from debut festivals around the globe such as Toronto, Telluride, New York, and Berlin, with many films procured from the directors themselves. For only the second year, the WFF has accepted unsolicited submissions, with the added excitement for festival organizers and audiences of discovering a new talent. Here is a short sampling of festival highlights: the opening film will likely be Topp Twins by Leanne Pooley, the story of country-western lesbian yodelers from New Zealand; The Beaches of Agnes, a richly visual tour de force by Agnes Varda is a self-portrait and recounting of the director and cinematographer’s life in film; in The Jazz Baroness Hannah Rothschild tells the story of her great aunt who went to New York in search of Thelonius Monk. The festival will close with the much-ballyhooed Yoo Hoo, Mrs. Goldberg by Aviva Kempner, the story of TV pioneer Gertrude Berg, who was the creator, principal writer, and star of “The Goldbergs.” In all, there are over twenty films shown throughout the ten days of the festival. Most films are shown twice, at least once at a handicapped-accessible venue. Director talks and panels are scheduled with some films. An important part of the festival has come to be spotlighting women’s creativity, particularly in the art of film, but also through “Visions”, a non-juried multi-generational exhibit of visual arts held at the Hooker-Dunham Theater & Gallery all through the month of March. The show is a silent auction with artists donating 50% or 100% of sale proceeds to the Crisis Center. Final bidding happens at the festival’s free closing party starting at 6:00 on Saturday, March 27th, which also includes a showing of the Best of the Fest, and celebratory refreshments. This year in collaboration with the Women’s Film Festival and “Visions” Art Exhibit, and benefiting the Crisis Center, Cappella Clausura, a women’s vocal ensemble of music professionals from the Boston area, will present a program of Sacred Music by women composers at the First Baptist Church on March 28th at 4:30. Briefs Millstone Antiques Moves and Expands – Ann Keller and Richard Latour, owners of Millstone Antiques have moved their business to Dorset across from the Dorset Inn (3390...

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Winter Inspiration
Mar03

Winter Inspiration

Winter Inspiration Winter Inspiration: A Nuance that Melts the Chill by Clara Rose Thornton Rolling farmland brims with an unbroken sparkle. Conifers hold onto their prickle of green, poking through the dusty black and white of mountain vistas. Tree trunks stand spindly and unadorned, lamenting the loss of foliage, while ice floes rush at their feet down rivers that careen through silent forests. This is winter in New England. Nor’easters and New England’s heavy snowfall are ominous and legendary. Yet there’s something to be said for the distinctness of four seasons and their gradual rotation through winter. Chilly winds rattling windows while one is safe inside by a fire, enjoying the introspection and increased time with loved ones that accompany the season, is as dynamic as any summer escapade. And many artists who enjoy capturing the distinctness of winter find its qualities not only inwardly enriching, but aesthetically and physically rich, as well. Possibly even more than for winter landscape painting, this is true for winter photography. In photography, there is less personal interpretation involved than there is the pristine, precise capturing of a moment in time. Even with photographic styles that utilize image manipulation, the blank canvas is a reproduction of truth already imprinted. Crisp and richly detailed, winter’s aesthetics are a pre-packaged delight for those living through the lens. “I do nontraditional black and white photography, with antiquated and alternative processes,” said Linda Treash of Barnard. “When you’re working with black and white, the snow, and winter in Vermont, particularly lends itself to it. Looking at black and white you’re looking at shadow and textures, all of which I find to be particularly rich in the winter.” “I love to photograph trees, which in winter are either covered in snow or create a contrast to the snow that’s alluring,” Treash continued. “We spend half the year in Vermont with no leaves on the trees, but the trees themselves—the shape of the branches—have a dynamic shape. They stand out in the winter.” Alistair McCallum of Mt. Holly feels similarly. “I like to work with shadows and light. Tree patterns in the sunlight against the snow—I find that very inspirational. I work in black and white, so the winter is made for me. I focus in on the borders of the landscape, the unveiling of the landscape, with the trees and hills having receded into their barer structures. Another theme I like to work with is natural oddities up close—crusted ice around streams, icicles with their abstract qualities.” McCallum’s “Winter Stream” exemplifies this. The outlines of rocks are given a ghostly heightening and definition, the white animating the structures...

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Marketplace
Mar03

Marketplace

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Artspace
Mar03

Artspace

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