Talk of the Arts: A year-long celebration
Dec15

Talk of the Arts: A year-long celebration

By Alex Aldrich How do you commemorate a 50th anniversary? A gift of gold? A fancy party? This is the dilemma the Arts Council faced as we discussed how to celebrate 50 years of public funding for the arts in Vermont. In 1965 the legislature designated the Arts Council as Vermont’s official state arts agency. From that year to now funding has come from the National Endowment for the Arts, matched by the State, to the Council to serve artists, arts organizations, schools, and communities. The effect of this support is a mature arts sector that is an integral part of Vermont’s landscape. Neither gift of gold nor fancy party is adequate to pay tribute to the catalytic impact that public funding for the arts has had on the character and culture of Vermont. Last year, the State Legislature proclaimed 2015 the “Year of the Arts,” setting the stage for a year of reflection on and amplification of the arts in Vermont. And in January, we launched “Vermont Arts 2015,” a statewide celebration of the arts. Vermont Arts 2015 is essentially a year-long celebration that highlights the stunning array of arts activities, from concerts to exhibitions and festivals that will occur all year long across the Green Mountain State. Through Vermont Arts 2015, we want residents and visitors to think “arts” along with skiing, fall foliage, and maple syrup. We will promote Vermont Arts 2015 through marketing and public relations campaigns, with the goal of boosting arts and culture as a valued part of the Vermont brand. This celebration, though, will not end on December 31. The Council is implementing several initiatives to keep the arts moving forward for the next 50 years. For example, a strong arts culture depends on the constant infusion of new work and new people. We must continue to advocate for arts education as a fundamental part of our school curriculum. A concerned group of leaders in the education field has already begun to identify priorities and strategies to ensure that Vermonters have the opportunity to develop their creative abilities and critical thinking skills in school. Throughout 2015, a series of forums will be held to hear from community members about how they “Envision the Future of Arts Education.” At the same time, we are developing a Vermont Creative Network to bring together individuals, organizations, and communities to build a statewide framework to grow and sustain local arts and cultural activities. This is how Vermont Arts 2015 will turn into Vermont Arts 2016, 2017, … 2065! In other words, we want the arts to remain at the center of Vermont life, only more visibly...

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Winter picks
Dec15

Winter picks

Brattleboro Clayworks Holiday Sale 532 Putney Rd, Brattleboro http://www.brattleboroclayworks.com All December long Brattleboro Clayworks is Southern Vermont’s ceramics resource center. Clayworks maintains a casual atmosphere, encouraging visitors to tour the work areas of the studio, and peek over the shoulders of working members. The Clayworks gallery features the work of its twelve members. Visitors will find a wide variety of professional quality works, including functional pots, sculpture and tile work, for home or gift giving, all at affordable prices.   Readsboro Glassworks Holiday Open Studio and Sale 6954 Main St, Readsboro http://www.maryangusglass.com Dec 13-14 and 20-21, 10a-5p Vermont glass artists Mary Angus and K. William LeQuier open their Readsboro glass studio to the public for their Annual Holiday Open Studio and Sale on two weekends, December 13-14 and 20-21, from 10a to 5p. Visitors are invited to stop in to see Angus and LeQuier’s beautiful hand blown glass and enjoy some hot mulled cider and homemade cookies while visiting with the artists. Studio visitors will find a unique collection of hand blown glass for sale including perfume bottles, bud vases, and colorful handmade glass candy cane and icicle ornaments. Also available are Angus and LeQuier’s glass snowflakes, individually sandblast-carved in clear glass.   4th Annual Mount Snow Film Festival Sundance Base Lodge, Mount Snow, West Dover http://www.mountsnow.com Dec 20, 5:30-7:30p What better way to get excited for the ski / snowboarding season than watching some amazing ski / ride movies? Come by to see some of the best new release ski and ride flicks in the industry. You will also be able to meet and greet Carinthia Team members. All ages are welcome, admission is free, and there will be a free raffle.   Harris Hill Ski Jump Cedar Street, Brattleboro http://www.harrishillskijump.com Feb 14-15, gates open at 10a More than 40 of the world’s top male and female ski jumpers from the US, Europe and Canada will compete this year at the Harris Hill Ski Jumping Competition, presented by Pepsi, on a 90-meter jump, designed to International Ski Federation (FIS) specifications. Located in Brattleboro, spectators watch the jumpers launch from the takeoff and soar more than 300 feet at speeds of nearly 60 mph. The event is a festive atmosphere for the whole family with food, music, beer tent and souvenirs. Gates open at 10a each day.   Brattleboro Winter Carnival Various locations in Brattleboro http://www.brattleborowintercarnival.org Feb 13-22, various times Celebrate the winter season at the Brattleboro Winter Carnival. This year’s events include an outdoor fun day with snowmobile rides, sugar on snow, sleigh/hay rides, figure skating show, cooking classes, pancake breakfast, cross country skiing, chili cook-off, children’s concerts,...

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Wine resolutions: Five objectives to enhance your enjoyment
Dec14

Wine resolutions: Five objectives to enhance your enjoyment

By Marty Ramsburg As this issue goes to press, 2014 is coming to a close, with 2015 in sight. Our new year starts with January, named after Janus, the Roman god of gates and doors generally depicted with two faces, one looking forward and one looking behind. Gates and doorways symbolize the transition to something new, to change. In the west, we have come to associate the new year as a time for reflection, to consider some of our past behaviors and resolve to make some changes. In the spirit of new directions, you may want to consider changing up some of your wine patterns. We offer a few wine resolutions below to get your creative juices flowing. One great thing about these—they should be fun and therefore, fairly easy to keep! If you have a local wine merchant with whom you have a relationship (we can recommend one—Windham Wines!), s/he can help with your selections. Perhaps should you adopt one or two, you will find yourself in an entirely different wine world by the end of 2015. Cheers! Travel broadly No need to spend a fortune on airfare and lodging; stay home and enjoy the world through wine. There are so many ways to structure this resolution. Here are some variations on a theme of wine travel: Follow your palate to some new regions. Do you love Sauvignon Blanc, but you mostly drink just those from California? Segue to the Loire for something similar but definitely not the same, or pick up a bottle from Marlborough in New Zealand. Maybe you love Pinot Noir, but haven’t ventured outside of Oregon to Burgundy. How about a side-by-side tasting of the same varietal from different regions? You’ll need some good friends to help you with this one. Let us know what you love and we can guide you as you broaden your wine repertoire. Explore a particular country through its wine. Thinking of going to the Dolomites on a bike trip next summer? Enjoy some wines from Alto Adige/Trentino area as a warm-up. Finally going to walk part or all of the Camino di Santiago de Compostela? You can enhance your preparations with some wines from Txokoli, Navarra, Bierzo and Galicia. Birding in Australia on your short list? Study your images and calls while exploring some wines from Victoria or Western Australia. Experiment with new varieties Do you always reach for Cabernet Sauvignon? Love your “go-to” bottle of Sauvignon Blanc? Make 2015 the year you try new varieties. Jancis Robinson, Master of Wine, published a tome earlier this year entitled Wine Grapes, in which she identifies over 1350 different grape...

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Shared printmaking space opens in Brattleboro
Dec14

Shared printmaking space opens in Brattleboro

Make your own fine art-work or art-wear at the newly opened Brattleboro Printmakers— a non-toxic, water based silkscreen studio open to membership 24/7 by code entry access. Brattleboro Printmakers provides emulsion, a UV exposure unit, wash-out booth, vacuum tables and 4-color turnstiles for artists to produce their work in a collective setting. Membership includes constant access, equipment, online portfolio representation, monthly & annual exhibition opportunities and public learning session options. Brattleboro Printmakers is centrally located adjacent to the Transportation Center and within walking distance to nearby Amtrak train from NYC and Montreal, local and national bus services. Rates: $800/year, $425/6 mo, $225/3 mo, $80/mo. Day rates: $25 for 4 hours with a technician. Not a printmaker? Become a collector. Original handmade prints by local artists available for sale....

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Economic engine: the impact of Southern Vermont’s arts scene
Dec14

Economic engine: the impact of Southern Vermont’s arts scene

By Joyce Marcel There are a lot of ways to assess a creative economy. One simple way is to add up the budgets of many of the area’s larger arts and cultural organizations, which indicates their buying power in the community. The combined budgets of places like the Brattleboro Museum & Arts Center (BMAC), the New England Youth Theatre (NEYT), Brattleboro Music Center (BMC), NECCA (New England Center for Circus Arts, the Vermont Jazz Center and others soar well over $5 million — that means there’s a lot of cultural money sloshing through the area. Where does it go? Besides salaries, the cultural economy supports bookkeepers, accountants and attorneys. It supports restaurants and shops. It finds its way into the hardware stores, shoe stores, gas stations, supermarkets, propane dealers, carpenters, contractors, health clubs, framing shops, insurance companies, truckers, auto repair shops, caterers and a host of other local businesses. Even Windham County’s circus performers need a dentist every now and then. Tourism is another driver of the cultural economy, and Southern Vermont has become a destination for tourists, art and theater lovers and second-home owners. Danny Lichtenfeld, Brattleboro Museum & Art Center’s executive director, says that a six-month study carried out by the museum showed that 50 percent of the people who visited had travelled to Brattleboro from an hour or more away. “And in overwhelming numbers, those people are going to a restaurant and doing some shopping,” Lichtenfeld said. “This shows the impact of the museum, in particular, on the local economy.” This is often called the “ripple effect” or the “multiplier.” In 2010, a national study showed an arts multiplier of $11 million in Windham County. A new study is needed, but certainly the number is much higher now — some estimate it as high as $35 million. The creative energy of Southern Vermont makes it an attractive place to live and work even if you’re not an artist. “Employers such as the hospital, or any big local employer who is trying to attract employees — well-educated and well-paid employees with families, these people have other opportunities to work,” Lichtenfeld said. “For employers like that, one of the things they put forward about the quality of life in this area is attractions like the museum. We have a small but world-class art museum, we have the youth programs at the New England Youth Theater, and how many music festivals? The arts add value to the community.” Many people living here do their creative work for local area corporations, colleges and industries. Add to them people like graphic designers and architects who have home offices in the renovated...

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Arts with letters: libraries are doubling as art galleries
Dec14

Arts with letters: libraries are doubling as art galleries

You might not expect to see paintings by such major artists as Wolf Kahn or Emily Mason in a community library in Southern Vermont, but at the Moore Free Library in Newfane you will. Nineteenth century Chinese ceramics are just part of the vast permanent art collection you might see in the Brooks Memorial Library in Brattleboro. The Canfield Gallery at the Martha Canfield Library in Arlington hosts a reception for a distinguished area artist on the first Saturday of nearly every month. At these and other libraries in Southern Vermont, patrons and visitors can drink in good art, build their own art collections, and contribute to the library, all at the same time. The pairing of art and libraries is a big win for art lovers, art education, library budgets, serious Vermont artists, and for tourists who are drawn to the beauty and richness of Southern Vermont. The trustees of the Martha Canfield Library in Arlington felt so strongly about the importance of art in the library that they incorporated an art gallery into the plans for their new building 17 years ago. Today the Canfield Gallery has built such a reputation that there is a waiting list of well-known area artists who want to show there. The monthly (Feb. through October) solo shows draw large crowds, and in 2014 the library’s 25% portion of art sales netted the library approximately $2,400. More important, many young library goers become lifetime art lovers. The Moore Free Library in Newfane has been the fortunate beneficiary of a foundation established by Thomas Crowell, who founded the Crowell Publishing Company (now part of Harper Collins) in 1876. He was an avid art collector, a lover of books, and a generous benefactor – traits passed down to his heirs. Thomas’ grandson, Robert Crowell provided an endowment before his death in 2001 to renovate an old barn on the library property into an art gallery. The Crowell Art Gallery now houses the Crowell’s large collection of contemporary Vermont art, the family’s significant library of art books, and encourages art collecting by hosting area artists and craftspeople. During January and February visitors may view a changing exhibit of the library’s large permanent art collection. Local artists and craftspeople exhibit during the other months. From November 1 through December 10, 2014, visitors can examine the oil paintings and drawings of Marilyn Allen and Nan Heminway in an exhibit entitled “Making Peace With Oddity.” The following exhibit will showcase quilts by the Newfane Quilters Group. Visitors to the Brooks Memorial Library in Brattleboro can take a self-guided tour of portions of the extensive permanent art collection donated...

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Historical detail, contemporary design: the Brooks House reopens
Dec14

Historical detail, contemporary design: the Brooks House reopens

By Katherine P. Cox Restoration of the Brooks House, an iconic building built in 1871 that spans half a block on Main Street, has brought grandeur back to downtown Brattleboro. The Second Empire-style building has a storied history as a premier hotel and summer resort complete with ballroom and famous visitors, including writer Rudyard Kipling. The building has been reclaimed from the destructive forces of fire and water thanks to the dogged determination of a handful of visionaries – led by Bob Stevens of Stevens & Associates and his partners Craig Miskovich, Ben Taggard, Drew Richards and Peter Richards – who recognized that saving the building was pivotal to a vibrant downtown. Restaurants, retail stores, upscale apartments, office space and two Vermont colleges are pumping life back into a building that was nearly destroyed by a five-alarm fire in April, 2011. Today, the renovated building is a stylish mix of historical detail fused with contemporary design to once again serve as the focal point for a resurgent downtown. “The underlying purpose was to help revitalize Brattleboro and create energy. To make Brattleboro better than it was before. To activate Main Street. To get more people downtown and help the town as a whole,” said Bob Stevens. Extensive work to clean up, stabilize and rebuild the structure, led by Breadloaf Construction of Middlebury, began in April 2012. “It was a gem,” Stevens said of the Brooks House, which over the years had lost its luster. “It’s a beautiful, iconic building.” It cost a million and a half dollars just to stabilize the building, Stevens said; the final cost of the restoration was approximately $24 million. The first order of business after the cleanup was to preserve what was there, Stevens said. “We didn’t replicate all of the original architectural features that had been removed over the years. We did restore everything that was remaining at the time of the fire and replicated the historic storefronts. What we rebuilt, we rebuilt right,” outside and in. The exterior of the roof was stabilized by slate and copper flashing and the dormers and all exterior moldings were built to match the old ones. The windows were all restored with insulated glazing. Focusing on the interior, Stevens said, the group thought about the building’s public spaces and wanted to create a gathering place that would stand out and make access to the new 23 apartments appealing. “We wanted to respect the significance of the architectural history and reflect the character of the building,” Stevens said, but also to bring in newer energy. They reorganized the circulation of the ground floor of the original hotel...

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Cargo bikes enter the transportation mainstream
Dec14

Cargo bikes enter the transportation mainstream

By Troy Shaheen Could cargo bikes sweep through Vermont, minimize carbon emissions, alter our notions of space and time, and revolutionize the way we organize our communities? Go Vermont and their “Cargo Bike Guru” Dave Cohen, can’t wait to find out. These utility bicycles, already a mainstay in Europe and in West Coast cities like Portland, Oregon, are poised to enter the transportation mainstream in Vermont — with an added boost from electric assist technology and statewide promotion from the Vermont Agency of Transportation. The alternative transport is gearing up for its big moment, with roots extending from the state’s cargo biking capital: Brattleboro. Dave Cohen, a Brattleboro therapist and counselor by profession, has been a cargo bike enthusiast and advocate for more than 20 years. He started his own cargo bike delivery business in Berkeley, California, in the 1990s, and is perhaps best known these days for peddling his young children up and down southeastern Vermont’s hills on his bright orange, long-tail electric assist cargo bike. With kids in tow, Cohen still easily fits the family’s groceries for the week as well as his camping gear. He holds regular discussions on the benefits of cargo bikes, and was recently hired by Go Vermont — a branch of the Vermont Agency of Transportation — to spearhead Vermont’s cargo bike movement. A man of many titles, Cohen goes by “Cargo Bike Guru,” “Cargo Bike Czar,” and “Cycle-Therapist” and he takes the psychological and neurological benefits of cargo biking very seriously. “I think that this is therapy for us,” he says, “because we’ve become so disassociated from the world that we inhabit. We’re literally losing our senses.” His voice echoes much of what’s known as the Slow Transportation Movement, a growing push for slower modes of transportation that engage the body and maximize sensory awareness. “Cars distort our connection to the ecological and social worlds that we pass through,” Cohen explains. “The automobile has become so embedded in our psyche that we literally conform to it.” He believes that by stepping outside the confines of the automobile, people become more present in their environment and ultimately more mindful of their effect on it. “It’s all about showing up,” he says. “And we really haven’t been showing up lately.” The advent of electric assist technology, which gives bikers a boost while keeping their speed under 20 mph, has added new capabilities to the traditional cargo bike and expanded the possibilities of who can use one, and for what. Getting places faster, carrying more cargo, and climbing hills easier are good things in a mountainous, cold place like Vermont, and Cohen feels this...

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Cold storage: How Harlow farm keeps vegetables through the winter
Dec14

Cold storage: How Harlow farm keeps vegetables through the winter

By Allyson Wendt There’s a touch of frost on the fields as I arrive at Harlow Farm in Westminster on an early November morning. After a long, warm fall, winter is definitely coming. I head for the relative warmth of the big barn, where I find farm manager Jon Slason and his crew trimming turnips for packing and delivery. I’m here to see the storage methods Harlow Farm uses for its winter veggies. With around 2,000 square feet of cold storage on site and another 2,000 rented from Black River Produce in Springfield, the farm has the largest facilities in the southern part of the state (Pete’s Greens in Craftsbury has the most up North). The cold storage facilities at Harlow were built in 2000 to allow the farm to expand in a sustainable way. “We could have found new markets to sell more fall produce and continue to shut down for the winter,” explains Slason. “But we wanted to find a way to employ people year-round. So we went for cold storage.” The farm employees around 18 people throughout the winter, and supplies storage crops like beets, turnips, carrots, cabbages, squash, and onions to local markets and restaurants. Keeping produce through the winter without spoilage involves a lot of science. Each vegetable, explains Slason, has a perfect combination of temperature and humidity that will keep it fresh. For thin-skinned crops like beets and carrots, that combination is around 97% humidity and 33 degrees. To maintain these conditions, crops are kept in bins in an insulated cold room. The chillers drain to the floor, which remains wet to maintain high humidity. (It is cleaned regularly for food safety purposes.) Vegetables are stored unwashed, because the dirt helps keep them from rotting; they are cleaned before being sent to stores and restaurants. Replicating these conditions at home is nearly impossible, unless you have a refrigerator that can maintain high humidity and can be dedicated to crop storage. And you’ll never have a gadget like the one Harlow Farm is testing, thanks to a University of Vermont Extension pilot program. A pair of sensors in the cold storage space at the farm texts and emails Slason if the temperature gets too warm or the humidity strays too far from optimal. That’s particularly important in the summer, when it can be difficult to keep up with the heat and the cold storage is used to keep delicate lettuces and other produce from wilting. Hard-skinned vegetables like winter squash and pumpkins are easier to store at home, because they require 60% humidity and temperatures between 50 and 60 degrees. A cool bedroom, basement,...

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Music & Theatre

Bellows Falls Opera House 7 Centennial Square, Rockingham http://www.bfoperahouse.com, 802 463-3964 March 28, 2015: The Steel Wheels, with Todd Roach, Mac Ritchey and Beth Lavinder, benefit concert for accelerate brain cancer cure.   Brattleboro Music Center 38 Walnut Street, Brattleboro www.bmcvt.org, 802 257-4523 Jan 10-11: Concert Choir presents Verdi’s Requiem at the Latchis Theater, 7:30p on Sat, 3p on Sun.   Latchis Theatre 50 Main St, Brattleboro www.latchis.com, 802 254-6300 Dec 9: John via National Theatre Live, 7p. Dec 13: MET Live in HD: Die Meistersinger von Nurnbert, noon. Jan 4: La Bayadere via Bolshoi Ballet, 1p. Jan 10-11: Concert Choir presents Verdi’s Requiem at the Latchis Theater, 7:30p on Sat, 3p on Sun. Jan 17: MET Live in HD: The Merry Window, 1p. Jan 22: Treasure Island via National Theatre Live, 7p. Jan 25: Nutcracker via Bolshoi Ballet, 1p. Jan 31: MET Live in HD, Les Contes d’Hoffman, 1p. Feb 14: MET Live in HD: Iolanta / Bluebeard’s Castle, 1p. Feb 22: Swan Lake via Bolshoi Ballet, 1p. March 14: MET Live in HD: La Donna del Lago, 1p. March 22: Romeo and Juliet via Bolshoi Ballet, 1p. April 25: MET Live in HD: Cavallleria Rusticana and Pagliacci, 1p.   Manchester Music Festival First Congregational Church, Manchester www.mmfvt.org, 802 362-1956 Dec 31: New Year’s Eve Family Concert at the First Congregational Church, Manchester, 4-5p. Dec 31: New Year’s Eve Evening Concert at the First Congregational Church, Manchester, 6-7p.   New England Youth Theater 100 Flat St, Brattleboro www.neyt.org, 802 246-NEYT (6398) Feb 13-March 1: Sherlock Holmes: The Adventures of the Speckled Band. March 20-29: Little Women.   Next Stage Arts 15 Kimball Hill Rd, Putney www.nextstagearts.org Dec 21:The Sweetback Sisters Country Christmas Singalong Spectacular, 7:30p. Jan 24: Dustbowl Revival, California-based roots collective, 7:30p. March 7: Libana, global music connecting cultures, 7:30p. March 14: The Slambovian Circus of Dreams (aka the Grand Slambovians), 7:30p.   Opera Theatre of Weston 100 Dale Rd, Weston www.operatheatreofweston.com, 802 824-3821 Jan 4, 10-11: The Secret Garden, based on Francis Hodgson Burnett’s classic masterpiece. At Paramount Theater, Rutland, Jan 4. At Weston Playhouse, Weston, Jan 10-11.   Sandglass Theater 17 Kimball Hill, Putney www.sandglasstheater.org, 802 387-4051 Dec 26: An Almost Victorian Christmas, by Sandglass Theater and Friends, 3 and 7p.   Stone Church Arts 20 Church Street, Bellows Falls stonechurcharts.org, 802 463-3100 Dec 20: Mili Bermejo, vocals, Dan Greenspan, bass, and Jiri Nedoma, piano, 7:30p. Jan 18: A Festival of Mandolin Chamber Music, 3p. Jan 23: Russian Duo, 7:30p. March 7: Tim Ray, solo piano, 7:30p. April 4: The Michele Fay Band, 7:30p.   Twilight Music 139 Main Street, Brattleboro www.twilightmusic.org, 802 387-5772 Jan...

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At the Museums
Dec14

At the Museums

Bennington Center for the Arts 44 Gypsy Lane, Bennington 10a to 5p, Mon-Sun (Closed Mon) http://www.thebennington.org, 802 442-7158 Thru Dec 21: Small Works Show, with figuratives, landscapes, cityscapes, wildlife, still-life’s and more. Thru Dec 21: Portraying the Human Spirit exhibit, a small show of 26 pieces that capture the essence of the human spirit. Thru Dec 21: The Laumeister Fine Art Competition. Thru Dec 21: Small Works Show. Thru Dec 21: Impressions of New England XIV. Ongoing: Permanent collection, featuring Native American and Southwestern artwork, with 300 paintings, 50 bronzes, 50 Hop Kachinas, 85 hand-woven Navajo rugs and numerous pieces of pottery, jewelry and baskets. Bennington Museum 75 Main St, Rte. 9, Bennington 10a to 5p (Closed Wed) http://www.benningtonmuseum.org, 802 477-1571 Thru Dec 30: Patsy Santo: A Growing Collection. This exhibition celebrates the recent gift to the museum of six of Santo’s paintings. Thru Dec 30: Nocturnes: Variations on a Theme. Artist Margaret Lampe Kannenstine has always had a profound interest in darkness, night skies in particular. “I am interested in what we see at night-and what we cannot see. Both are important in conveying the sense of darkness.” Thru-Dec 30: Reflections at the Festival of Trees. The museum is pleased to present a wonderful exhibit of Uniquely Designed and Decorated Holiday Trees created by artists, businesses, and non-profit entities throughout the area. Ongoing: The museum’s permanent collection includes the Grandma Moses Gallery, the Gilded Age of Vermont, Bennington Modernism, the Fine Art Gallery, Bennington Pottery Gallery & Study Center, and the Military Gallery. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center 10 Vernon St, Brattleboro 11a to 5p (Closed Tues) http://www.brattleboromuseum.org, 802 257-0124 Thru March 7: Your Space: Portraits. For much of history, only those of high social rank and affluence could afford to commission artists to create their portraits. But artists themselves have been creating self-portraits regularly since the Renaissance period, when mirrors became common and affordable to many. Thru March 7: Portraits, Expanded. Portraits, Expanded is a multi-gallery exhibit featuring work by artists who extend the traditional concept of portraiture to include language, voice, time, history, community, and culture. Thru March 7: World Leaders & Global Citizens: Photographs by Patrick Leahy, Senator. Organized in conjunction with the 40th anniversary of Patrick Leahy’s service in the U.S. Senate, this exhibit reveals the photographer’s unique perspective on global events and players, from ordinary citizens to presidents. The Clark Art Institute 225 South St, Williamstown, Mass 10a to 5p Tuesday thru Sunday http://www.clarkart.edu, 413 458-2303 Thru Feb 15: Monet – Kelly Exhibition. This exhibition focuses on the significant role Claude Monet’s motifs and the sites that inspired his paintings have played in...

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At the Galleries
Dec14

At the Galleries

Bennington Arts Guild 103 South St, Bennington http://www.benningtonartsguild.org , 802 442-7838 Thru Dec 31: The Bennington Arts Guild Holiday Show.   Catherine Dianich Gallery 139 Main St, Brattleboro Open by appointment only www.catherinedianichgallery.com, 802 380-1607 Thru Dec 30: The Blue Prophetic Alphabet.   Chaffee Art Center 16 South Main St, Rutland www.chaffeeartcenter.org, 802 775-0356 Dec 5-20: Holiday Boutique and Gingerbread House Contest.   Crow Hill Gallery 729 Flamstead Rd, Chester www.crowhillgallery.com, 802 875-3763 Special 2014 Exhibits: The Vivaldi Suite and The Paradise Suite.     Gallery at the VAULT 68 Main St, Springfield www.galleryvault.org, 802 885-7111 Jan 10: Winter Landscape in Watercolor workshop with Robert O’Brien. Jan 17: Do You Want to Build Snow People? Needle Felting workshop with Sue Carey. Jan 24: Winter Landscape in Pastel workshop with Robert Carsten. Feb 21: What Does the Fox Say? Needle Felting with Sue Carey. Feb 28: Making Imaginary Landscapes Real with Christine Mix. March 14: Anticipating Spring workshop with Robert Carsten. March 28: How to (Tame) Needle Felt Your Dragon with Sue Carey.   Gallery North Star 151 Townshend Road, Grafton 10a-5p daily (Tuesday by chance) www.gnsgrafton.com, 802 843-2465 2014: 40th Anniversary celebrations all year long. Dec 13-Jan 19: James Urbaska Solo Show. Opening reception Dec 13, 5:30-7:30p. Starting Feb 7: Winter Group show. Opening reception Feb 7, 5:30-7:30p.     Gallery Wright 103 West Main St. (Rt 9) Wilmington http://www.gallerywright.com gallerywright.blogspot.com Thru-Dec 31: Beautiful Dreamers — Oil painters Ann Sklar and Eric Angeloch create landscapes of those dreamy moments in our day. These paintings are luminous, luscious reflections on the majesty and beauty of Vermont.   Mitchell-Giddings Fine Arts 183 Main St, Brattleboro www.mitchellgiddingsfinearts.com, 802 251-8290 Thru-Jan 4: Brattleboro West Arts Members show, along with guest artist Emily Mason and MGFA artists. Jan-March 2015: Doug Trump exhibition. March-April: Stephen Procter exhibit. April-August: Artwork of Lauren Olitski.   Thorne-Sagendorph Art Gallery At Keene State College, Keene, NH www.keene.edu/tsag, 603 358-2720 Jan 23-March 26: Biennial Regional Juror’s Choice Competition.     Vermont Center for Photography 49 Flat Street, Brattleboro 2-7p Fri, noon-5p Sat and Sun www.vcphoto.org, 802 251-6051 Dec 5-28: Annual Members Holiday Exhibition. Opening reception Dec 5, 5:30-8:30p. Jan 2-Feb 1: Michelle Rogers Pritzl: Soma. Opening reception Jan 2, 5:30-8:30p. Feb 6-March 1: Nicholas Gaffney: Sunday. Opening reception Feb 6, 5:30-8:30p. March 6-29: 30 Under 30: A Juried Exhibition. Opening reception March 6, 5:30-8:30p.     The Village Green Gallery 661 Main St, Weston, 9a-5p daily www.thevillagegreengallery.com, 802 824-3669 Featuring the photography of Nobushi Fuji’i and showcasing works by selected Vermont artists and artisans, the cozy building next to the Vermont Country Store offers a place for visitors to savor...

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