Holiday Open Studios

...

Read More

Marketplace

...

Read More

Vermont Wine and Food

...

Read More

Brattleboro Spotlights

...

Read More

Spotlight

Read More

Artspace

Read More

A Flair for Floorcloths

A Flair For Floorcloths The Henry Gould Farm sits at the base of Vermont’s picturesque Mount Ascutney as it has since the early 19th century. In the carriage house wing of the Gould farmhouse is Canvasworks, Lisa Curry Mair’s primary workspace. A Flair For Floorcloths The Henry Gould Farm sits at the base of Vermont’s picturesque Mount Ascutney as it has since the early 19th century. In the carriage house wing of the Gould farmhouse is Canvasworks, Lisa Curry Mair’s primary workspace. Mair is a throwback of those earlier times. Her painted canvas floorcloths are made, as they would have been hundreds of years ago—one painstakingly slow step at a time. She designs each piece, lays it out on paper then transposes it to a prepared canvas “blank” floor cloth before painting it. She uses little more than paints, brushes and a sewing machine to create each work of floor art. And painting isn’t her only old-way-of-doing-things activity each day. The farm’s old dairy barn is home to Mair’s four horses that she and her daughter tend to and ride daily. In the winter the woodstove needs stoking, and walkways need shoveling; in the summer the flower gardens around the pond in the backyard need attention too. Even though Mair tends to stay close to home her work does not. Over the past fifteen years, since the beginning of Canvasworks, she has created over seven hundred floor cloths that have made their way all over North America. Her book, Floorcloth Magic (Storey Books, 2001) teaches readers how to make their own. Parts of her website and blog encourage everyone to try their hand at painting on large canvas. “If people can slow down, sit still and put a little piece of themselves into something that can last a lifetime, they will experience the satisfaction of making and leaving their mark. In these times of hurried, scattered days filled with endless lists and mindless chores, a little bit of that satisfaction can go a very long way.” (canvasworksfloorcloths.com) For Cameron Howard the road to the art of painting floorcloths began with a love for cooking and the culinary arts. She followed that path from New York, to Boston, to Maine and, finally to Vermont. Eight years ago, she put the culinary pot on the back burner and turned her passion for creating to weaving. From there, she segued into the decorative painting world that, in turn, led her to traditionally handcrafted floorcloths. And, that’s when she created Dunberry Hill Designs in West Townshend, Vermont. Cameron enjoys the more traditional designs, like the Mission style or the American Folk motifs, but...

Read More

Workshops and Lectures

Lectures, Workshops & Classes Brooks Memorial Library 224 Main St, 802 254-5290 brooks.lib.vt.us Rodger Martin poetry reading, Wed, Sept 8, 7pm: The poet will read from The Battlefield Guide n Eugene Uman on Thelonious Monk, Wed, Sept 15, 7pm: Uman, the artistic director of the Vermont Jazz Center, will discuss the artist’s life and music n Exploring the Night Sky with a Telescope, Thurs, Sept 23 (Rain/clouds date: 9/29), 7:30pm n Keith Goodale, Keene Astronomy Club, leads an astronomical observing session n Debt Management for Undergraduates, Tue, Sept 14, 7pm n Film: The Letter; An American Town and the Somali Invasion Wed, Sept 22, 7pm n Vincent Panella reads from Lost Hearts Fri, Sept 24, 7pm n The library, Friends of the Library, and Vermont Adult Learning host a Vermont Reads event around Katherine Paterson’s newly published book on anti-immigrant feelings, The Day of the Pelican Wed, Sept 29, 7pm. Post Oil Solutions 877 886-7397 postoilsolutions.org Sat, Sept 4, 9am-noon: Backyard Chicken Harvest, Fair Winds Farm, pre-registration & payment required: $20 at gate, if there is room. Brattleboro Stone Church letsdancesovt.org 802 348-6671 Fall classes: ballroom, Latin social, African, Abene, English country, waltz and contra dance. Tai Chi, spiritual movement. Brattleboro Clayworks 532 Putney Road 802 254-9174,  brattleboroclayworks.com Fall Classes, including wheel throwing and hand building for children and adults. Full schedule on the web. A 10 week Hand-building & Sculpture class starting on Wed Sept 22, 6-9pm 802 387 4820, Alans@sover.net n 10 week Hand-building & Sculpture class Wed evenings, Jan 26, 2011 802 387 4820, Alans@sover.net Brattleboro Museum & Art Center 10 Vernon St, 11am to 5pm (Closed Tuesdays)brattleboromuseum.org , 802 257-0124 Sept 2: Picturing History: Art and the American Presidency, 7:30pm n Sept 3: Art Films, “Years in the Making,” 8:30pm n Sept 3: Dance performance by Luminz Dance Studio, 5:30-8:30pm n Sept 9: The Demise and Return of Passenger Train Service in America, 7:30pm n Sept 20: Puppetry in America, 7:30pm n Sept 30: Artist Talk: Andy Yoder, 7:30pm n Oct 1: Art Films, “The Art of the Steal,” 8:30pm n Oct 7: Trains that Passed in the Night, slideshow lecture of industrial photographer O. Winston Link, 7:30pm n Oct 9: Wolf Kahn Lecture: Can Artists be Taught? 7:30pm n Oct 14: Reshaping Reality Artists’ Discussion, 7:30pm n Oct 21: Community Cinema: Reel Injun, 7:30pm n Oct 23: Brattleboro Sketchcrawl, fun informal art event for all ages, 2-4:30pm n Oct 29-Nov 1: BMAC’s Third Annual LEGO Contest for all ages. Cellar Holes & Lime Kilns vtarchaeology.org /events Sat, Sept 18, 10am: Starts at the church in Westminster West tour the cellar holes left by your...

Read More

Brattleboro Calendar

Brattleboro Calendar Library Card Signup Month Sept 1-30, Brooks Memorial Library, brooks.lib.vt.us Get your smartest card at Brooks Memorial Library. During the month, show your library card for 15 percent discount on purchases made at all five Brattleboro bookstores. New non-resident cards, one year for $25 (normal rate is $48). Free membership in the Friends of the Library. Brattleboro Women’s Chorus Open Sing Wed, Sept 1, 7-8:30pm, All Souls Church, 120 Guilford St. brattleborowomenschorus.org This is a chance for women to gather with each other, with women’s chorus alumni and newcomers, and sing old favorites and some new songs. It’s free! Vermont Jazz Center Jam (See Spotlights) Wed, Sept 1, 8-10pm, vtjazz.org Gallery Walk (See Spotlights) Fri, Sept 3, 5:30-8:30pm Art Films after Gallery Walk 8:30pm, brattleboromuseum.org The Stockwell Brothers Fri, Sept 3, 6:30pm, Tavern lawn, Main St., Putney, 802 387-5772 hookerdunham.org (Rain: The United Church) Twilight Music presents Americana melodies riding funk, reggae and Latin grooves, new singer/songwriter gems recast with 5-string banjo and trio harmonies. Free to the public (donations are accepted) food is available.   Tony Barrand & Keith Murphy: On the Banks of the Coldbrook Fri, Sept 3, 7:30pm, NEYT, brattleborotix.com Tony Barrand  ( Nowell Sing We Clear) and Keith Murphy (Nightingale) have released a CD the Atwood songs and, in this Dover Bicentennial year, prepared an account of how summer resident, Edith Sturgis of “ Coldbrook ”, met and befriended James and Mary Atwood. Tickets: $15, $10 (seniors, children) United Way of Windham County Community Day of Caring (See Spotlights) Sat, Sep 4, 8am, unitedwatwindham.org Beantown Swing Orchestra (See Spotlights) Sat, Sept 4, 7:30pm, latchis.com ATP Staged Reading: Rosmersholm Sat, Sept 4 and Sat, Sept 11, 7:30pm, Actors Theatre Playhouse, West Chesterfield NH, actors – theatre.info A play believed by many to be Ibsen’s dramatic masterpiece, in a new version by Mike Poulton . Reservations not required. All tickets $6 at the door. Friends of Music at Guilford (See Spotlights) Sat, Sept 4, 7:30pm, fomag.org Friends of Music at Guilford (See Spotlights) Sun, Sept 5, 2pm, fomag.org Labor Day Dawn Dance Sun, Sept 5, 2:30-5:30pm and 8pm-7am, Gibson-Aiken Center, dawndance.org Dawn Dances are held on Labor Day and Memorial Day. Each starts with an English country dance followed by an all night contra dance. Ticket $10 for 2:30 to 5:30pm English session, $20 for the 8pm to 7am contra, and $25 for both. For seniors/students the prices are English $7, contra $15, both $22. The Perry/ Baksys Duo Sun, Sept 5, 8pm, Phelps Barn, The Old Tavern, Grafton oldtavern.com Annette Perry, cello, and Vytas J. Baksys , piano.  $10 tickets, or enjoy dinner at the inn that...

Read More

Calendar

At the Museums Bennington Center for the Arts 44 Gypsy Lane, Bennington10am to 5pm, Tues-Sun. (Closed Mondays)benningtoncenterforthearts.org. 802 442-7158 Thru Dec 19: Small Works Show, figurative, landscape, still lifes and city-scapes. Thru Sept 6: Inspired by Nature, celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Vermont chapter of the Nature Conservancy. Thru Dec 19: The Laumeister Fine Art Competition, featuring artists from around the country. Sept 11-Nov 28: Impressions of New England, 75 works of art of seashores, foliage and wildlife. Bennington Museum 75 Main Street, Rte. 9, Bennington10am to 5pm (Closed Wednesdays)benningtonmuseum.org, 802 477-1571 Thru Oct 31: State of Craft. This landmark exhibition examines the evolution of the contemporary studio craft movement in Vermont, featuring more than 125 objects by 86 Vermont craftspeople. Sept 25: Farm to Table Dinner: An evening celebrating local farming. Elegant, yet casual seven course tasting dinner prepared by local chefs from southern Vermont and the Berkshires. Oct. 2: Fourth Annual Southern Vermont Home Brew Festival, 12-5pm. Tickets include unlimited tastings, a commemorative tasting glass, ‘snacks’ from Madison Brewing—Brew Pub & Restaurant, live music, voting chip, brewing demonstrations, and medieval tournaments. Nov 27: Festival of Trees, with children’s activities, visits to Santa, gifts, shop discounts and more, 10am-5pm. Dec 4: Winter Wonderland Gala with live music, great food, silent and live auctions and more, 7-11pm. Dec 17: Holiday fun from 8-midnight with cocktails, great music and more. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center 10 Vernon Street, Brattleboro 11am to 5pm (Closed Tuesdays)brattleboromuseum.org, 802 257-0124 Thru Oct 24: Reshaping Reality, featuring works by 11 artists associated with the Boston Sculptors Gallery. Thru Oct 24: O. Winston Link: Steam & Steel, photo exhibit devoted to capturing images of the trains, workers, and communities that were rapidly changing as steam engines gave way to diesel. Thru Oct 24: River Stories, the Connecticut River captured in words, images and gathered samples of water, sediment and rock. Thru Oct 24: Brattleboro Riverfront Project, interactive exhibit focusing on possibilities for future development. Thru Oct 24: Lumberland, picnic table exhibit created specifically for BMAC. The Clark 225 South Street, Williamstown, Mass10am to 5pm Tuesday through Sundayclarkart.edu, 413 458.2303 Thru Nov 30: Constable and After: Sir Edwin Manton and the British Landscape. Thru Sept 12: Picasso Looks at Dagas. Thru Oct 17: Juan Muñoz. Estey Organ Museum 108 Birge St., Brattleboroesteyorganmuseum.org, 802 246-8366 Ongoing: The Estey Organ Museum features exhibits on the Estey Organ Company chronology, their reed organs, pipe organs, and electronic organs, Estey tools, advertising, catalogs. Closes Oct 11 for the winter. Hildene Estate Route 7A, Manchester, hildene.org, 802 362-1788 Sept 18, Oct 9, Nov 20, Dec 18: Bird walks, 8am. Sept 25:...

Read More

Inspired by Nature

Inspired by Nature Ceil Petrucelli Many contemporary sculptors are often inspired by nature and natural forms, the elements of fire, wind, and water, and the relationship and synergy that these various elements have with each other and with us, the viewer. Inspired by Nature Ceil Petrucelli Sculptors through the ages have been making three-dimensional forms by chiseling stone, carving wood, modeling clay, casting metal, and constructing a variety of both representational and realistic forms by combining various mediums to create a finished piece. Many contemporary sculptors are often inspired by nature and natural forms, the elements of fire, wind, and water, and the relationship and synergy that these various elements have with each other and with us, the viewer. Kate Pond, well-known Vermont sculptor, says that her inspiration comes from curves she sees in nature: fiddlehead ferns, tendrils and vines, birds in flight, grasses moving in the wind, waves and ripples on water. “My sculpture invites participation—with people, with the sun, with the shadows and alignments at different seasons of the year.” Many of her sculptures document time, while others mark the various seasons, casting shadows or light at the equinoxes and at summer and winter solstice. Kate transfers these “curves of inspiration” into calligraphic strokes, first with ink and a brush. Later, she cuts the “strokes” out of steel, bending them into shape with an oxy-acetylene torch. These small-scale works are the maquettes, or preliminary models, from which the larger, final steel sculptures are made. Many of her works are private commissions, and she often gets inspiration from the actual site where the finished piece will reside. Her material of choice is Corten steel. It rusts to a deep dark patina and light creates subtle changes over the surface, which she finishes with her signature swirls that reflect light in many directions. Kate also uses concrete and stone boulders in some of her pieces, especially her sundials. Her most recent work, Come Light, Visit Me, was installed and dedicated at Champlain College in Burlington, Vermont on August 13, 2010. She is currently working on a piece, l’Esprit Guardien, originally a private commission but now for sale. More information about Kate Pond can be found on her website katepond.com. William Nutt works from his studio in White River Junction, Vermont. His route to full time stone sculpture has been a bit circuitous by his own admission. He has a degree in geology from Dartmouth College and competed nationally and internationally in kayaking and at one time was a top U.S National Champion, Number one ranked U.S. paddler, and a U.S. National Team Member. Asked about the transition from engineering...

Read More

Talk of the Arts

Talk of the Arts If Vermont is not usually considered among the stomping grounds of serious creativity and artists, little wonder. For most people, Vermont is all about skiing, breath-taking natural beauty and cows. And isn’t that what the Vermont brand is all about? Well, it’s certainly what we’ve been telling folks for a long, long time. In 1891, Vermont became the first state to promote itself. The Publicity Bureau, established in the Secretary of State’s office, used state funds to promote Vermont as an escape from the city. “A place of rural beauty, a place where farms produce wholesome food and where mountains, lakes and trails offer vigorous, refreshing outdoor recreation, a place where history is important and relationship to the land still means something. Vermont is a safe place, away from the noise and crime of the cities.” — promotion of Vermont in 1891, taken from article written by Tom Slayton (2003) A recent study by the Vermont Tourism & Marketing Department confirmed that people perceive Vermont “as a place offering robust outdoor recreation, unspoiled landscape, whether it’s winter or summer, a place to get away and back to nature. According to Christine Werneke, chief marketing officer for the state of Vermont, people who have never been here say it’s because they didn’t know what there was to do. If the State is looking for new areas of growth, why doesn’t it capitalize on the creative energy that pulses throughout Vermont. Why don’t we focus on a niche market that is seeking more cultural and artistic things to do? Vermont has more artists per capita than almost any other state. Marketers would call that our unique selling proposition. Capitalizing on the rich soil that has nourished many artistic endeavors from colonial times to the present could attract a new visitor. Educating potential vacationers on what’s available could have a huge impact on local economies. Friends visiting me, for example, are always surprised at how much there is to do and how much of it is cultural. We have what people are looking for today—authentic experiences with plenty of local color. Real food and culinary options, the abundance of thriving art galleries, arts, artisans, open studio tours, creative festivals, museum shows and gallery walks. These gatherings and activities bring out the townspeople and tourists alike to bask in the creative energy—this is an image of Vermont that most folks don’t get to see. SO Vermont Arts & Living puts a window on this scene with features on the personalities behind visual arts, music, cuisine, theater, literature and design. Our extensive calendar of events is packed with artful things...

Read More