Weddings35-37
Feb17

Weddings35-37

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Weddings31-34
Feb17

Weddings31-34

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Weddings 27-30
Feb17

Weddings 27-30

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Weddings23-26
Feb17

Weddings23-26

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Weddings19-22
Feb17

Weddings19-22

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Talk of the Arts
Feb10

Talk of the Arts

Talk of the Arts Will Peter Shumlin become known as the “Arts Governor” of Vermont? As reported in Seven Days in December, Burlington City Arts Director Doreen Kraft, said that Shumlin told her that he wanted to be he first “arts Governor” since Madeleine Kunin.   We’d like to see  that happen, but with the State facing a budget deficit of $150 million we wonder what will happen to the arts. According to Vermont Arts Council Executive Director, Alex Aldrich, in a recent blog, “The state of Vermont has many ways to increase its revenues (taxes on in- come, property, sales and use, room and meals; fees for hunting, driving, fishing, camping and other services; and many other things too tedious to mention here). But a recent study (from Doug Hoffer courtesy of Melinda Moulton) shows that the revenue impact of the arts sector on the State of Vermont is close to $19.5 million—or about $17 million MORE than the state invests in the arts through various agencies. This is an ROI of nearly 800%…every year! Through several phone calls to a couple of Vermont’s best known “art towns” Aldrich reports: “the aggregate of local investment is less than $500,000.* This figure, combined with the State’s investment in the arts (including appropriations from the General and Capital Funds, and line items for the Vermont Symphony, Humanities Council, and Historical Society, results in a total State/Local investment of less than $2.5 million. This return says Aldrich, “takes place regardless of the fact that the Department of Marketing and Tourism, at least up until now, has not promoted the arts as part of the Vermont Brand. With the notable exception of Vermont Life magazine the state has done very little to publicize the arts in Vermont.” Another aspect of economic recovery requires one to think slightly more holistically about what kinds of things generate investments that lead jobs. Why do people choose to live and work in one town and not another? Why do people choose to establish a business in Vermont and not in New Hampshire or New York? Aldrich continues: “According to people like Richard Florida, more than ever, people can live where they want because technology has enabled them to telecommute. As more and more of Ver- mont gets broadband, the more Vermont will become attractive to telecommuters. But broadband is only a piece of the “where to live” decision. Equally important are the availability of housing stock, the quality of the local shopping, the access to high quality recreational and cultural opportunities and, perhaps most important of all, the quality of the local schools. These last two, cul-...

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What’s New

What’s New Art Making with Chinese Words and Poetry Painter, t’ai chi master, caterer, art and language instructor, and co-founder and artistic director of Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT) in West Brattleboro, Cai Xi has been giving Chinese cultural and arts performances since 1995 presenting for pre-kindergarten through college-level adults. Her residencies have included supervisory unions, school districts, statewide Arts events, public and private schools, home schooling and early childhood groups, summer programs, teacher training, and community festivals. A 2010 Fellow at Vermont Studio Center, she was recently awarded a Community Arts Grant from the Vermont Community Foundation for a Chinese Word Art Book Project. She explains, “The goal is to publish a bilingual Chinese character art book composed of student work coming from Windham Southwest and Southeast Supervisory Unions (in southeastern Vermont). Student art of Chinese characters will be presented together with student poetry with translation into Chinese. Students will adorn printed Chinese characters and/or produce their own writing samples of Chinese characters through artwork choosing from among a variety of art forms such as ink-and-brush calligraphy, Chinese paper-cut technique, collage, paint, mixed media (such as with fabric and yarn) and more.” The student word art and poetry will be published in May, and there will be an exhibition of student work at locations and times to be determined. Updates and details at chinesewordartbook.wordpress.com, or contact Project Coordinator Cai Xi Silver at caixiart@gmail.com or 802 257-7898, ext. 3. New Institute of Contemporary Art to Open in Chester VTica (Vermont Institute of Contemporary Arts) bills itself as a Gallery-Museum-School dedicated to supporting the innovative contemporary artist. According to the founders, Robert Sarly, President, and Abby Raeder, Managing Director, the goal is to create an inviting space to engage the community through diverse thought-provoking art works and events. The newly modernized facility (formerly the American Legion Building) will include a 2,000 square foot exhibit gallery with revolving exhibits of graphic arts and sculpture in solo and group shows. A stage area is available for live music and dance performances. In addition, there will be an outdoor three-dimensional sculpture art space. A permanent collection will be housed in the 650 sq. ft. interior Hearth Barn. The offices and artists workshop teaching studios, of 1200 sq. ft., are located on the 2nd and 3rd floors for either instruction or self-directed retreat. “We have assembled a wide circle of interested supporters that include watercolor and acrylic artists, oil painters, sculptors and craftspeople, live performance artists, business leaders, innkeepers and restaurateurs in and around Chester. These are the avant guarde of the new creative economy that can impact a revitalization of not just art,...

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Vermont Food & Wine

Vermont Food & Wine “The garden seeds being dropped from the catalogs are the very best vegetable varieties we will ever see.”  —Kent Whealy, Seed Savers Exchange Seed-saving and crop improvement has been the right and responsibility of farmers since the dawn of agriculture. Although today there is more awareness of heritage food crops, such as the beloved Brandywine tomato, most of us have forgotten the farmers’ art of seed saving and how to select seeds best adapted to our farms and gardens. Why not start a seed circle this year? Get together with a few friends or neighbors and each plan to save one or two kinds of seeds. After the growing season you can gather for a harvest potluck and share all the seeds you’ve saved. You only need to save seed for the one or two plants that you care about, but in the end you’ll have five, 10 or more different kinds of seeds for the following season. And you’ll be growing the most delicious and nutritious fruits and vegetables. What you need to know: Non-hybrid varieties (also called open-pollinated or Heirloom) will breed true and produce plants just like the parent-plants. Hybrids are seeds of parents with different qualities. Plants grown from hybrid seeds typically do not produce seeds that can be used to grow the same type of plants, and can even produce seeds that will not grow at all.   —Courtesy of Post Oil Solutions   INSERT GRAPHIC HERE ———— Post Oil Solutions: Garden Workshops (Re)learning to Feed Ourselves February 2011 Workshops (Note: co-sponsored by the Grafton Nature Museum) 2p-4p United Church of Bellows Falls, 8 School Street, Bellows Falls. Workshop Presenter: Robert King. FEE: $10/$40 sliding scale. No one refused for lack of funds. Pre-registration/payment required: 802-843-2111. $20 at the door if there is room. Sun Feb 13: 9×12 Garden: for Beginning Gardeners. Sun Feb 20: Root Cellars. Sun Feb 27: Cold Frames....

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Wine Observed: Wines for Celebrating

Vermont Food & Wine I am drinking the stars!               —Dom Perignon Wine Observed: Wines for Celebrating by Marty Ramsburg Champagne and other sparkling wines are some of our favorites. They have long been associated with celebrations and that seems natural. After all, how can one help but feel cheerful when holding a stem with all those beautiful, lively bubbles forming elegant threads as they race to celebrate their own liberation? We start many of our get togethers with sparkling because we feel that having good friends, and spending time together, is cause for celebration. There are myriad sparkling wines, from Champagne to Prosecco, Cava, Cremant and nearly countless other sparklers. While Champagne remains the gold standard, Mike Steinberger, wine writer for Slate magazine, has observed that, “the quality threshold [for Champagne] really begins at about $35 these days”—and read $40 for Vermont. But there is more to sparkling than Champagne, i.e., those sparkling wines produced within the Appellation de Controllée (AOC) of Champagne in northern France. We love Champagne, but we can hardly afford a bottle with any regularity, let alone buying multiple bottles to share across many guests who are raising a glass to toast to the enduring love of the bride and groom. If you want those guests to finish that glass, rather than just put it down after the toast, here are some more affordable, but delicious, options for sparkling wines. Chardonnay-Pinot Noir Sparklings — The grapes from which Champagnes are generally made are Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier. The two Pinots are red grapes, but because the juice is not left in contact with the skins, most champagnes are clear. Many countries, including the United States, make sparkling wine in the same method as Champagne and using the same grapes. In fact, several Champagne houses have operations in California, including Moet and Chandon (Domaine Chandon), Tattinger (Domaine Carneros), Mumm, and Roederer (Roederer Estate). Don’t overlook Gruet, a French Champagne producer that has pioneered New Mexico. In the US, Australia, and South Africa (Graham Beck) wines made from Champagne’s grapes usually rely exclusively on Chardonnay and Pinot Noir.  They too are made Brut, or dry, and can be made as blends of Chardonnay and Pinot, or exclusively from Chardonnay (Blanc de Blancs) or exclusively from Pinot Noir (Blanc de Noirs). These well-made, delicious wines generally run from the mid- teens up to $25. One problem: you’ll have to buy extra to accommodate those heretofore skeptics who want another glass! Cava  — Spain makes its own version of sparkling wine. Usually made from the grapes Parellada, Xarel-lo, Macabeo and occasionally Chardonnay, Cavas have tremendous acidity with earthy,...

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Two Countries, Two Weddings…One Love
Feb10

Two Countries, Two Weddings…One Love

Two Countries, Two Weddings…One Love by Joyce Marcel It was love at first sight, but it’s remarkable that this couple met at all. Lynna Scarlett Barrett, 29, met Lachlan Hayes Barnard, 38, in Los Angeles in 2006. But Lynna—the daughter of the editor of this magazine —is from Vermont. And Lachlan is from Australia, where the couple lives now. Naturally, when it came time to wed, geographical boundaries presented a problem. The solution was a wedding on each continent. The Australian wedding was a coastal-themed dinner party for 38 of Lachlan’s family and friends at a restaurant. “It was easy to plan,” Lynna said. “All we had to organize was flowers (Australian natives and roses), cake (chocolate mud cake) and pick the menu (mostly seafood). Sue, Lachlan’s mom, helped me with all the planning, which made it even easier. It was very simple—more Lachlan’s style— modern and clean. I wore 4″ Christian Louboutins. Lachlan wore his favorite navy blue Alexander McQueen suit. It was a celebration of Lachlan’s connection with me and there was a sense of Lachlan’s friends and family welcoming me.” Meanwhile, back in Vermont, Lynn was entering into a frenzy of ecstatic planning for the second wedding, which was going to be at her home in Dummerston with its rolling lawns and flower gardens. Did it complicate or make things better that Lynn’s closest friends are professional chef Sharon Myers, professional decorator Priscilla Cotton, and professional designer (and design director of this magazine) Marjorie Merena? Probably a little of both. Marjorie did the invitations. Priscilla took on the “country casual” decor. Soon “Team Decor,” made up of Lynn, Priscilla, organizer Karen Abel and floral designer Mark Malloy started meeting at Lynn’s home every Wednesday evening. “I have to say that it gave me so much pleasure to put together all these things,” Priscilla said. “Lynn had collected beautiful fabrics and pieces that she loved and had pulled together for her family. Her house is such an expression of love. We looked at all of her china collections – she had a beautiful set from her mother, and one she got when she was married. We made the tablecloths from different patterns of fabrics she had collected.” All of the greens and sculptural pieces came from Lynn’s garden. The flowers came from Marjorie’s garden as well as Lynn’s. “We ordered 50 pale pink roses, but that was it,” Priscilla said. “Each table was set differently — different china patterns, different cloths, different flowers. All of the flower arrangements were in old sugar bowls and creamers and small vases that Lynn has throughout her house.” When Lynn mentioned...

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Southern Vermont: The Perfect Wedding Destination
Feb10

Southern Vermont: The Perfect Wedding Destination

Southern Vermont: The Perfect Wedding Destination by Janet Dunnington The charm of historic villages, the warmth and coziness of country inns, and the area’s breathtaking beauty…couples travel from all over the world to celebrate their nuptials in Southern Vermont. The gentle rolling hills of the green mountains, fields carpeted with wild flowers, babbling brooks, rustic old barns and covered bridges, and, of course, our signature fall foliage, make Vermont a place that naturally inspires romance. It’s no wonder that Vermont is one of the most popular spots for destination weddings. Southern Vermont: The Perfect Wedding Destination by Janet Dunnington The charm of historic villages, the warmth and coziness of country inns, and the area’s breathtaking beauty…couples travel from all over the world to celebrate their nuptials in Southern Vermont. The gentle rolling hills of the green mountains, fields carpeted with wild flowers, babbling brooks, rustic old barns and covered bridges, and, of course, our signature fall foliage, make Vermont a place that naturally inspires romance. It’s no wonder that Vermont is one of the most popular spots for destination weddings. A small sampling of some of Southern Vermont’s top wedding destinations begins with two of it’s most beautiful villages—Grafton and Weston. In Grafton, you can exchange vows in your own  “village for the day.” Your guests can walk the village streets, browse the local galleries, or sample artisan cheeses. Grafton is home to Vermont’s renowned Grafton cheddar. You can marry in the white steeple church and host your reception in Phelps Barn at the Old Tavern. Another village that’s perfect for a Vermont Country wedding is Weston, a village that’s virtually untouched by time. Today the entire village is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Inn at Weston provides one-stop shopping with beautiful grounds, two local churches, photography, officiant services, wedding planner and that’s just the beginning. With its marble sculptures, Romanesque columns, and 1930s’ wall murals, the Latchis Hotel and Theatre in Brattleboro is an art-deco treasure. Known as one of the best small arts towns in America, Brattleboro sports a true small-town Main Street, lined with unique artisan shops. The Brattleboro Museum offers an elegant, bright space for a wedding with natural light from a skylight and large windows, brightly painted walls, marble accents and woodwork original to the 1916 building. After a nice stroll in the historic downtown, guests can stop by the Flat Street Pub and sample their locally crafted Microbrews. A little further north in south-central Vermont the Okemo Valley’s resorts are all experienced in the art of weddings. If you’re looking for a small and intimate wedding, Inn Victoria in...

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Poetic Inspiration

Poetic Inspiration by Stacey Kors What occasion could be better suited for the reciting of poetry than a wedding? While it’s become commonplace for poems to be read as part of a wedding ceremony, most people don’t realize that there’s a long and rich tradition linking poetry to weddings. In fact, the practice dates all the way back to the ancient Greeks, who first invented something called the “epithalamium,” which is a song in praise of the bride and bridegroom, typically sung at the door of the nuptial chamber on the wedding night. The hopeful song blessed the couple and predicted their happiness, often referencing various nymphs, gods, and goddesses, asking them to watch over the newly joined pair and consecrate their wedding bed. It was the ancient Greek, female lyric poet Sappho, from around 700 BCE, who first wrote down the epithalamium and turned it into a literary form: Raise up the roof-tree— a wedding song! High up, carpenters— a wedding song! The bridegroom is coming, the equal of Ares, much bigger than a big man. The epithalamium later became popular with Roman writers such as Ovid, Catullus, and Claudian, but was then lost until the Renaissance, when it was famously revived by the British “cavalier” poets, including John Donne, Ben Jonson, and Edmund Spenser. Spenser’s “Epithalamion,” which was written in honor of his own marriage and features 23 stanzas representing the hours of the wedding day, is the most renowned example of the form in the English language: O fairest Phoebus, father of the Muse, If ever I did honour thee aright, Or sing the thing that mote thy mind delight, Do not thy servant’s simple boon refuse, But let this day, let this one day be mine, Let all the rest be thine. Then I thy sovereign praises loud will sing, That all the woods shall answer and their echo ring. Not surprisingly, couples these days aren’t too keen on having their marriage chamber blessed at great length by gods and goddesses. (While a beautiful and romantic work, Spenser’s seemingly endless poem would cause you and your new spouse to do little more than nod off in your wedding bed.) Instead, brides and grooms are interested in concise poems about love and marriage that can be recited during the ceremony. There are countless wonderful love poems out there, spanning the centuries, with many specifically on the blessings of marriage. A book like Into The Garden: A Wedding Anthology: Poetry and Prose on Love and Marriage can help you to narrow down the field. Or, how about celebrating a New England wedding with the verse of a...

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