At the Museums
May20

At the Museums

At the Museums Bennington Center for the Arts44 Gypsy Lane, Bennington10a to 5p (Closed Mondays)benningtoncenterforthearts.org , 802 442-7158June 9-July 14: Artists for the New Century. Southwest Art, American Art Collector and Fine Art Connoisseur nominated artists show the piece best showcasing their work on the representative art scene. June 16-Aug 5: Art of the Animal Kingdom XVI, with special guest artist Greg Beecham. July 2-8: American Artists Abroad. July 14-Aug 17: Impressions of New England. Over sixty scenes captured in paint & bronze. July 21-Sept 23: California Art Club- Saving Paradise: The Symbiosis of Landscape Painting & Environmental Awareness. Collection from the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery at Barnsdall Park documents CAC artist preservation. Aug 11-Sept. 23: The Laumeister Fine Art Competition. Artists from around the world are invited to submit work for the fourth annual fine art competition juried by Scott Christenson. Sept 29-Oct 27: Oil Painter of American Eastern Regional Exhibition. Bennington Museum75 Main Street, Rte. 9, Bennington10a to 5p (Closed Wednesdays)benningtonmuseum.org, 802 477-1571Thru May 22: “Memento Mori” The Art & Commerce of Gravestones in Bennington. June 9-Oct 30: Rockwell Kent’s ‘Egypt’: Shadow & Light in Vermont. Ongoing: The Bennington Museum Celebrating Vermont’s Heritage offers eleven galleries of permanent and changing exhibits and features the largest public collection of Grandma Moses paintings and Bennington Pottery in the world, fine and decorative arts, military artifacts, the 1924 Martin-Wasp touring car, and the Bennington Flag, one of the earliest ‘stars and stripes’ in existence. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center10 Vernon Street, Brattleboro11a to 5p (Closed Tuesdays)brattleboromuseum.org, 802 257-0124May 22: Pink Pint Night, 5:30p. June 1: Art Film After Gallery Walk: Climbing Redwood Giants, 8:30p. June 3: BEAN Dinner & Micro-Grants, 6p. June 15: Cais’ Dim Sum Teahouse @ BMAC, 5:30-9p. June 17: Brattleboro Tree Walk, 2p. Meet at Main Street Post Office. June 23-24: The Green Gold Tree, 1p. Multimedia production based on Goethe’s Faust featuring lantern slides, film, puppets, gold textiles & original music. June 28: Past, Present & Future of the Southern Vermont Forest, 7:30p. Slide presentation & panel discussion. July 6: Art Film After Gallery Walk: Intangible Asset No. 82, 8:30p. Jazz drummer searches for an enigmatic Korean Shaman. Aug 6-8: Visual Thinking Strategies Institute. Thru July 8: Six concurrent exhibits that explore our physical & metaphorical relationship to trees seen for millennia as botanical analogues for human life, spiritual touchstones, & expressions of family connectivity. The Clark Art Institute225 South Street, Williamstown, Mass10a to 5p Tuesday thru Sundayclarkart.edu, 413 458-2303June 15: Summer Opening Party, 7p. Purchase tickets online. June 16-Sept. 16: Then & Now: Photographs of Northern China. June 16-Sept. 16: Through Shen-kan: Sterling Clark in China. Celebrate the 100th anniversary...

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Music & Theater

Music & Theater Bellows Falls Opera House7 Centennial Square, Rockinghambfoperahouse.com, 802 463-3964May 23: South Pacific. May 30: Oklahoma. Enjoy movies on the biggest screen in Vermont every Friday. Brattleboro Music Center38 Walnut Street, Brattleborobmcvt.org, 802 257-4523June 25-29: Camp Calliope with Valerie Kosednar, 9:30-11:30a. Music & Movement, ages 3-5. June 25-29: Music Extra! with Raquel Moreno, 1-3p. Music Theory, Sight Singing & Games, ages 6-9. June 18-22: Piano Duets for Kids with Raquel Moreno & Bruce Griffin, 10-12p. Ages 6-12. June 25-29: Traditional Arts Camp for Kids with Andy Davis, Keith Murphy & Becky Tracy, 8:30-3p. Ages 9-14. July 9-13: Hit It! Percussion Camp with Steve Rice & Julian Gerstin, 9:30-4p. Ages 9:30-4p. July 16-20: Get Real Day Camp, 8:30-3:30p. Ages 12-18. Get Real Getaway, Overnight Singing Camp. Girls age 15-18. The Clark Art Institute225 South Street, Williamstown, Mass10a to 5p Tuesday thru Sundayclarkart.edu, 413 458-2303Free outdoor summer concerts: July 3: The Eagles Band, 6p. July 10: Misty Blues, 6p. July 17: Banjo Dan and the Mid-nite Plowboys, 6p. July 24: Incendio, 6p.Chamber Music at the Clark: July 31: Ying String Quartet, 8p. Aug 7: Hermitage Piano Trio, 8p. Aug 14: Carpe Diem String Quartet with Yihan Chen, pipa player, 8p. Aug 21: Shanghai String Quartet, 8p. Dorset Theatre FestivalP.O. Box 510, Dorset802 867-2223, Dorsettheatrefestival.org37th Summer Season: June 20-July7: Good People; July 7-15: Hills Alive! Festival Week, July 12-28: Boeing-Boeing, Aug 2-11: The Whore and Mr. Moore, Aug 16-Sept 1: Deathtrap. Friends of Music at Guilfordhttp://www.fomag.orgSept 3&4: 46th Annual Labor Day Weekend Festival. Classical Music.Grafton Music FestivalVarious locations in Graftongraftonmusicfestival.comJune 29: Evening Outdoor Concert. June 30: Festival Day—Grafton Expo & children’s activities, 1p. Outdoor Concert with the Sweetback Sisters. Evening Concert with Corvettes Doo Wop Revue. July 1: Music Service at the White Church. July 3: 22nd Annual Vermont Symphony Orchestra Concert & Fireworks Extravaganza at Grafton Ponds Outdoor Center. Manchester Music FestivalShows at Arkell Pavilion at Southern Vermont Arts Center, Manchester, 7p mmfvt.org, 802 362-1956July 5: Opening Night, The Kalichstein-Laredo-Robinson Trio performs works by Haydn, Mendelssohn & Schumann. July 12: Oren Fader, guitar & Yehuda Hanini, cello perform works by Castelnuovo-Tedesco, deFalla & Smetana. July 19: Imani Minds performs Poulenc, Piazolla & Paquito d’Rivera. July 26: Manchester Chamber Orchestra. Beethoven “Triple” Concerto, Mozart Symphony no. 40. Aug 2: Jessica Lee, violin & Michael Ibrahim, saxophone perform Dvorak, Bach, Schoenfeld & Piazolla. Aug 9: Stefan Milenkovich, violin & David Deveau, piano. All Russian Program. Aug 16: Young Stars from the Metropolitan Opera, Caren Levin, piano. Marlboro Music Festival2585 South Road, Marlboromarlboromusic.org, 800 343-0049Since 1951 Marlboro Music has played a leadership role in the development of chamber music worldwide, & in enriching the artistry & changing the lives...

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At the Galleries

At the Galleries Asian Cultural Center of Vermont and C.X. Silver Gallery814 Western Ave, Brattleboroaccvt.org, 802 257-7898, ext. 1Sept 26 & 30: Art as Food as Art: Dim Sum at BMAC, 5:30-8:30p. May 20: Brattleboro’s Kite Festival of Japan, China & India, 1-3p. Living Memorial Park Kiwanis Shelter. Craft activities, games, calligraphy, poetry, music, giant windsocks, origami, storytelling, & bake sale. Bring your own kite to show & fly. Aug 19: Brattleboro’s Tanabata/Obon Japanese Summer Double Festival, 6-8p. Living Memorial Park Kiwanis Shelter. Sept 26: Rumi Celebration at Asian Cultural Center of Vermont (ACCVT) home base in West Brattleboro. Sept 30: Mid-Autumn Moon Festival of China, Korea & Vietnam, 5:30-8:30p. Living Memorial Park Kiwanis Shelter. Ongoing: Kiri-E Paintings of Hiroshima Youth of 1945 exhibit. Carving Studio and Sculpture Center636 Marble Street, Rutlandcarvingstudio.org, 802 438-2097Thru July 1: 25th Annual Members Show.July 13-Aug. 19: Emerging Sculptors Exhibition. Exhibition of maquettes by symposium participants & other up-and-coming young artists. Sept 8-Oct. 21: SculptFest2012. Large-scale outdoor installations in the 13th annual event with theme, “Keep On Keepin’ On…” by curator Adam Frelin. Featuring a fine art raffle at opening reception. Chaffee Art Center16 South Main St, RutlandTues-Sat 10-5p, Closed Sat & Sunchaffeeartcenter.org, 802 775-035650th anniversary – will mail brochureMay 25-July 7: Summer Member’s Exhibition/Pastel Society. July 13-Aug 18: Vermont Watercolor Society Annual Show. Juried by Steven Quiller. Aug 11-12: Art in the Park. Voted one of the top ten Summer events by the Vermont Chamber of Commerce. Aug 24-Sept 29: Annual Full House Exhibit. Featuring Kitty O’Hara, Christine Holzchuh, Chikako Suginome, Anne Havel, Meta Strick & Mareva Millarc.Crow Hill Gallery729 Flamstead Rd, Chestercrowhillgallery.com, 802 875-3763Nestled in the woods among outdoor sculptures, the gallery offers a beautiful variety of viewing spaces. Here one can view in contemplative elegance a large selection of Jeanne’s most recent works, as well as the sculpture of visiting artists. Gallery 1037 Pineview Drive, Chester802 875-7400, gallery103.com.Featuring fine American Craft, this art space is filled with the handmade craft of more than 100 New England artists, featuring photography, jewelry, ironwork, textiles, blown glass, pottery, soaps, candles & woodwork. Gallery 2 and Vermont Artisan Designs106 Main St, Brattleboro10a-7p, Mon-Sat, 11a-4p Sunbuyvermontart.com, 802 257-7044Through June: Dispatches from the Winter without a Winter, painting by Charlie Hunter. A mixture of studio and in-the-field work demonstrating Hunter’s precise eye and loose brushwork. The show also debuts the use of window squeegee in his repertoire of painting tools.In addition to the fine art and sculpture found in Gallery 2, the works of more than 350 American craftspeople are on display. Gallery at the VAULT68 Main St, Springfield, Vermontgalleryvault.org, 802 885-7111Featuring fine art and hand-crafted gifts from over 165 local and regional artists and...

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Workshops
May14

Workshops

Southern Vermont: A Mecca for Pro-Am Artists Classes, Workshops Lectures & Residencies Brattleboro Museum & Art Center10 Vernon Street, Brattleboro11a-5p (Closed Tuesdays)brattleboromuseum.org, 802 257-0124June 28: Past, Present & Future of the Southern Vermont Forest, 7:30p. Slide presentation & panel discussion. Aug 6-8: Visual Thinking Strategies Institute.The Clark Art Institute225 South Street, Williamstown, Mass10a to 5p Tuesday thru Sundayclarkart.edu, 413 458-2303June 14: Michael Cassin, Director, Center for Education in Visual Arts. June 17: Opening lecture: Unearthed: Recent Archaeological Discoveries from Northern China. Free lecture by Annette L. Juliano, Professor of Asian Art & History Rutgers University. July 8: Digging the Ancient Maya, 3p. Free lecture by Stephen Houston, MacArthur Fellow & Dupee Family Professor of Social Science at Brown University. Looking at Lunchtime: Join Clark curators at 12:30p for a look at their personal favorite works from our permanent collection. July 12: Sarah Lees, Associate Curator of European Art. August 9: Michael Cassin. July 29: Unearthed & Notions of Ethnic Identity in Medieval China, 3p. Free lecture by Christopher Nugent, Associate Professor of Chinese at Williams College. Aug 4: Constable After Modernism, 2p. Free lecture by Tim BarringerChaffee Art Center16 South Main Street, Rutlandchaffeeartcenter.org, 802 775-0356The Chaffee Art Center has a full schedule of summer camps & workshops for students ages 6 & older. Camps & workshops will focus on a variety of media and styles including 2D Media: Drawing, Watercolor, Acrylic, Oil & Printmaking, Recycling & Art, Abstraction, Graffiti Art, Comic Books & Children’s Books. Workshops may also include a research oriented approach to art such as the Journey Around the World Camp & Exploring Family Heritage. Art Teacher Kristen Partesi will be leading all camps & workshops, and has many great projects, & some field trips scheduled. Visit their website & click on “Studio School” to find the full list of programs, dates, descriptions & fees.Fletcher Farm611 Route 103 S., Ludlowfletcherfarm.org, 802 228-8770June 16-20: Quilting Open Studio with Susan Balch. June 23-24: One Stroke Painting on Fabric with Barbi Weaver. Stained Glass Jewelry with Barbara Klumb. June 25-28: Needle Felting Various Wool Birds with Sue Carey. June 25-29: Stained Glass—Open Studio Garden Delight with Barbara Klumb. Creating a Watercolor Reference Notebook with Cynthia Emerlye. Beginners Pontypool with Anne Dimock. June 29-July 1: Spinning with Marilyn Brandner. June 30-July 1: Viking Knit Jewelry with Sally Mack.  Seamless Felted 3D Bags with Linda Veilleux. Beginning Punch Needle Rug Hooking with Layne Herschel. July 2-6: Bauernmalerei (Bavarian Folk Painting) with Barbara Gutheil. Chinese Brush Painting with Linda Schultz. Hand Building Clay with Carole Carr. July 5-6: Beginning Bobbin Lace with Evelyn Grant. July 6-7: Silver Fabrication with Harold Bosco. July 6-8: Drawing Nature with Roger Hydman. Nuno Felted...

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Hills Alive
May14

Hills Alive

Collaboration of the Arts: Hills Alive! by Joyce Marcel The hills are alive with the sound of music. Also acting, painting, dancing, tapas and cooperation. Four major Southern Vermont arts organizations have reacted to Tropical Storm Irene by saying goodbye to artistic turf wars and banding together for the very first time to present the Hills Alive! festival, July 7th through July 15.     The organizations are The Dorset Theatre Festival in Dorset, the Manchester Music Festival in Manchester, the Southern Vermont Arts Center in Manchester and the Weston Playhouse Theatre Company in Weston. They are using as their model the Massachusetts Berkshires, where world-class arts organizations attract people in the summer from all over the world. The idea of banding together had a long gestation period. The groups have been talking about cooperating for several years. Last year they tried bundling tickets. Then they thought about having a central box office, but they didn’t have the time or resources to create one. Finally, after Irene, they hit on the festival idea and things started clicking into place. “There is no way to underestimate the power of the storm,” said Dina Janis, Dorset’s artistic director. “But as we were trying to support each other through that period—and how impressive the state is in terms the way it pulls together and how much progress they’ve made in such a short period of time! This area has everything going for it—a setting that is gorgeous and sophisticated with fine art, fine theater, fine dining. The festival name was a way to describe that we live in this beautiful green hill region, and it’s just very alive with the arts.” Artists have a natural need to communicate, said Steve Stettler, the producing director of the 75-year-old Weston Playhouse. “First, there’s that natural need to reach out and touch base and look at possibilities for collaboration with the changes in the economy,” Stettler said. “But we’ve all longed for the chance to be more closely connected. The more the arts can flourish in this area, the better for all of us.” The Weston Playhouse was hard hit during Irene, when it suffered more than a half million dollars in damages. “The amount of generous support that came almost immediately was overwhelming,” Stettler said. “From people showing up almost immediately to help us carry things and muck out—at times it was very moving. Then company members and other stars staged a review at an Off-Broadway theater in New York and raised over $30,000 for us. It was inspiring. It not only helped with the budget but it lifted our spirits and told us, ‘You...

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Spotlight Great Hall
May14

Spotlight Great Hall

Spotlight The Great Hall One hundred River Street, Springfieldhttp://www.springfielddevelopment.org The Great Hall is Vermont’s new large-scale public art showcase that opens for the first time to the public on July 20 with a group show called Emergence. Artists include: Patty Sgrecci mobiles, Rick Hearn oil on canvas, Scot Borofsky enamel on linen, Robert Carsten pastel, Robert O’Brien watercolor, Oliver Schemm sculpture, Carolyn Hack sculpture, Stephen Procter stoneware and Tapestry Weavers in New England (TWiNE). The Great Hall is housed in the once productive and historic Fellows Gear Shaper Factory building now known as One Hundred River Street. The factory was one of the largest and best known of the precision tool industry buildings in Springfield. Now after a multi-million dollar renovation the building includes a medical center, and space for retail, restaurants and the wonderful new venue for public art—the Great Hall. With a soaring 25ft ceiling and atrium windows, the hanging space for art and sculpture is dramatic. The walls lend themselves to extra large artwork. The Great Hall’s public art space gives contemporary form to the founders’ legacy of innovation. The Emergence exhibition will be on view through November 1. A public opening reception is slated for July 20 from 5:30-7:30p....

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Calendar
May14

Calendar

At the Museums Bennington Center for the Arts44 Gypsy Lane, Bennington10a to 5p (Closed Mondays)benningtoncenterforthearts.org , 802 442-7158June 9-July 14: Artists for the New Century. Southwest Art, American Art Collector and Fine Art Connoisseur nominated artists show the piece best showcasing their work on the representative art scene. June 16-Aug 5: Art of the Animal Kingdom XVI, with special guest artist Greg Beecham. July 2-8: American Artists Abroad. July 14-Aug 17: Impressions of New England. Over sixty scenes captured in paint & bronze. July 21-Sept 23: California Art Club- Saving Paradise: The Symbiosis of Landscape Painting & Environmental Awareness. Collection from the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery at BarnsdallPark documents CAC artist preservation. Aug 11-Sept. 23: The Laumeister Fine Art Competition. Artists from around the world are invited to submit work for the fourth annual fine art competition juried by Scott Christenson. Sept 29-Oct 27: Oil Painter of American Eastern Regional Exhibition. Bennington Museum75 Main Street, Rte. 9, Bennington10a to 5p (Closed Wednesdays)benningtonmuseum.org, 802 477-1571Thru May 22: “Memento Mori” The Art & Commerce of Gravestones in Bennington. June 9-Oct 30: Rockwell Kent’s ‘Egypt’: Shadow & Light in Vermont. Ongoing: The Bennington Museum Celebrating Vermont’s Heritage offers eleven galleries of permanent and changing exhibits and features the largest public collection of Grandma Moses paintings and Bennington Pottery in the world, fine and decorative arts, military artifacts, the 1924 Martin-Wasp touring car, and the Bennington Flag, one of the earliest ‘stars and stripes’ in existence. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center10 Vernon Street, Brattleboro11a to 5p (Closed Tuesdays)brattleboromuseum.org, 802 257-0124May 22: Pink Pint Night, 5:30p. June 1: Art Film After Gallery Walk: Climbing Redwood Giants, 8:30p. June 3: BEAN Dinner & Micro-Grants, 6p. June 15: Cais’ Dim Sum Teahouse @ BMAC, 5:30-9p. June 17: Brattleboro Tree Walk, 2p. Meet at Main Street Post Office. June 23-24: The Green Gold Tree, 1p. Multimedia production based on Goethe’s Faust featuring lantern slides, film, puppets, goldtextiles & original music. June 28: Past, Present & Future of the Southern Vermont Forest, 7:30p. Slide presentation & panel discussion. July 6: Art Film After Gallery Walk: Intangible Asset No. 82, 8:30p. Jazz drummer searches for an enigmatic Korean Shaman. Aug 6-8: Visual Thinking Strategies Institute. Thru July 8: Six concurrent exhibits that explore our physical & metaphorical relationship to trees seen for millennia as botanical analogues for human life, spiritual touchstones, & expressions of family connectivity. The Clark Art Institute225 South Street, Williamstown, Mass10a to 5p Tuesday thru Sundayclarkart.edu, 413 458-2303June 15: Summer Opening Party, 7p. Purchase tickets online. June 16-Sept. 16: Then & Now: Photographs of Northern China. June 16-Sept. 16: Through Shen-kan: Sterling Clark in China. Celebrate the 100th anniversary of Clark’s...

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Artists Survive and Thrive
May14

Artists Survive and Thrive

Artists Survive and Thrive After Irene by Dan DeWalt Last summer, many of us who live along the Rock River in southern Vermont thought that we knew the river and our neighboring communities. Tales of the floods of ‘27 and ‘38 were pieces of our history, if not so relevant to our daily lives. But on August 28, under the relentless deluge of tropical storm Irene, the roots of that knowledge cascaded into a rubble of scree. We found ourselves separated from our landscape and awash in uncertainty.   For the twenty or so independent artisans who comprise the Rock River Artists, our namesake changed from an idyll into a symbol of destruction.   When the skies cleared, the entire community worked to recover what was salvageable, clear away what wasn’t, and provide solace and assistance to those who had experienced loss. What we discovered was how little we really knew about each other. David Moore is a native Vermonter who moved his family in with his mother in South Newfane after his father had passed away. He knew that there was a group called Rock River Artists, painters, potters, woodworkers and others who plied their trades in his neighborhood. He was aware of their show in the old South Newfane schoolhouse every July, but he had never availed himself of the show or the artists’ open invitation to visit their studios during that same weekend. He reckons that some of his reluctance may have arisen from the stereotypical distrust country natives often have of newcomers, especially those affiliated with the arts or coming from urban areas. But this separation from these neighbors didn’t sit well, so in July of 2011, he and his wife Kathleen went to visit three nearby studios during the open house weekend. “I came away amazed” he said, “There are some people that do things that most of us can’t imagine, like Chris [Triebert’s] still life photographs taken without a camera. It was very interesting to get to know better the people we visited.” David is also the head of emergency management for the town of Newfane and helped to evacuate the neighborhood. He knew that Triebert’s studio was located in the flood plain and was almost certainly inundated. “After the flood when we returned that first day, my thoughts went to Chris and Carol” Moore said. “I was convinced that they’d be homeless.” Chris and her partner Carol Ross thought the same thing as they sheltered a safe uphill distance from the raging waters. “Sitting in [the neighbors’] meditation room, I realized that the Buddhist philosophy is about letting go and I remarked to Carol how fitting...

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Talk of the Arts Collaborations
May14

Talk of the Arts Collaborations

Talk of the Arts Collaboration According to Wikipedia, collaboration is working together to achieve a goal. It is a recursive process where two or more people or organizations work together to realize shared goals, (this is more than the intersection of common goals seen in co-operative ventures, but a deep, collective, determination to reach an identical objective, for example, an intriguing endeavor that is creative in nature)—by sharing knowledge, learning and building consensus.   Most collaboration requires leadership although the form of leadership can be social within a decentralized and egalitarian group. In particular, teams that work collaboratively can obtain greater resources, recognition and reward when facing competition for finite resources. Collaboration is the theme running through this issue. We touch on the aftermath of tragedy and how people come together in the face of adversity. It is often in the darkest moments of life that we see the brightest of kindness, love and new opportunity. The after effects of Tropical Storm Irene will be with us for years and decades. How people and organizations have reacted and changed is what we explore in this issue. For example, collaboration and creative energy in the arts has blossomed. In Manchester, four major arts organizations are banding together for the very first time and creating a first-ever joint festival modeled after the Berkshires where world-class arts events attract people from all over the world. On the Rock River that was devastated by the storm, artists and town folks are coming together to build community, and in Grafton, Gallery North Star has cleverly tied a successful artist with five top inns for an exhibition they’re calling the Inns and Outs of Vermont. In another story of collaboration, we look at the at the work of the Riverledge Farm and Foundation in Grafton, which promotes historic preservation, conservation, forest and wildlife management and careful stewardship of natural resources that reflect the character of Southern Vermont. A mission that couldn’t be more timely. In a related story of preservation, our Designed Observed section features two of our favorite artists, Petria Mitchell and Jim Giddings and the restoration of their Dream Studio. This leads to Open Studio Tours—and the artist tours that are celebrating major anniversaries. Here’s a shout out to the 20th Anniversary of the Vermont Craft Council’s Statewide Open Studio Weekend, the 20th Anniversary of the Rock River Artist Tour, the 10th Anniversary of the Walpole Artisan Tour, and the 34th Anniversary of the Putney Craft Tour. And, finally, Marty Ramsburg, co-owner with Frank Larkin of Windham Wines, shares with us her trip to the Loire Valley in France. So, here’s to collaboration...

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Works On Paper, on The Square
May14

Works On Paper, on The Square

Works On Paper, on The Square in the village of Bellows Falls, is a studio that provides museum-quality conservation services for artwork, historical documents, photographs, maps, and memorabilia. “We can treat almost anything made of paper,” owner and head conservator Carolyn Frisa explains. “A lot of what we deal with is artwork and documents that have been damaged by acidity, causing them to yellow and decay.” Often, objects arrive rolled, folded, or torn. They may have been damaged by floodwater, rats, insects, mold, and “sometimes even spilled coffee or food” is the culprit. One client discovered, at a yard sale, a century old small watercolor painting entitled “Seaside Cottage” by the Nantucket artist Jane Reid. The painting was glued to a crumbling piece of cardboard and the paper was yellow and grimy. Worst of all, dark brown spots known as “foxing” had erupted all over the clear blue sky of the painting. Carolyn’s experience —she received her master’s degree in paper conservation in 2001— and decade-plus of experience determined the steps to restore the painting. First she peeled away the decaying layers of cardboard, then gently washed the paper to remove the destructive acids. Only then was it safe to treat the stains. After these treatments, the sky above “Seaside Cottage” is once again clear. While many Works On Paper clients are individual collectors, others are institutions. Last spring a burst pipe at the nearby Rockingham Public Library soaked dozens of photographs, documents, and maps in the library’s Local History Room. Fortunately, Frisa and her assistant, Raven Mueller, were able to quickly and carefully dry these objects before mold could set in. From a conservator’s point of view, mold poses a particularly difficult challenge: it not only causes permanent stains, but the fungus actually feeds on and digests the paper, making it weak and spongy. “You only have about 48 hours to act after a water exposure” before permanent damage occurs, Frisa explains. “After Tropical Storm Irene we were contacted by a museum in upstate New York with a collection of Civil War letters and military documents that were soaked in the flood. They couldn’t get the work to us right away but managed to get the documents into a freezer the following day. Mold can’t grow at low temperatures, so that bought us some time.” On any given day, you can find Frisa and Mueller working on something interesting — an original painting by Alexander Calder or a treasured piece of family history. Years of damage and neglect are carefully lifted away and the object is preserved to last. “We literally breathe new life into some pretty fabulous...

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Inns and Outs
May14

Inns and Outs

Inns and Outs by Joyce Marcel Take a successful painter, a clever idea and the aftermath of a fierce tropical storm, put them together and what do you get? Something just like the show called “Inn and Outs of Vermont,” from Vermont artist Phyllis Chase, at Gallery North Star in Grafton. It will run from July 14 through Aug. 12.Chase has been a professional artist all her working life. She grew up in Washington, D.C., and studied art at Smith College. She moved to Maple Corner—just north of Montpelier—with her husband and young son from San Diego, California 30 years ago. She was so struck by the beauty of the landscape, the working farms and the strong sense of community that, “I felt I had to record it in the most heartfelt way I could,” she said. Chase uses a palette first created in the 1890s in Paris, France by the Impressionists.“I am a plein-air painter, which means I paint on location and not from photographs,” Chase said. “I love the adventure and immediacy of working that way. Like Vermeer and Matisse, I want to portray how we live, and like Monet and Van Gogh, I want to portray the landscape we live upon in an intimate, personal way. I hope my paintings make the viewer feel what I felt as I painted them, and therefore strike a common chord.”That chord resonates with Chase’s many admirers, said Edward Bank, the co-owner, with his wife Kim, of Gallery North Star.“We’ve represented Phyllis for many years,” Bank said. “One of her specialities is doing oil paintings of interiors. People find these paintings inviting. It’s like you want to go into her paintings sit down and have a glass of wine. Like the chair is askew, just waiting for you to pull it up and relax. For this show, Phyllis, Kim and I thought it would be interesting for her to do a series of paintings of various interior and exteriors of inns in the area. Sort of a southern Vermont thing.”The show will include about 30 paintings Chase has done at The Grafton Inn, the Four Columns Inn in Newfane, the Windham Hill Inn in West Townshend and the Inn at Sawmill Farm in West Dover.“We wanted to do something to highlight Southern Vermont’s remarkable recovery from Hurricane Irene, and to promote businesses in this beautiful section of the state,” Chase said. “And I love to travel. Edward and Kim arranged for me to visit five well-loved Southern Vermont Inns and create paintings, both inside and outside the properties. The result is a collection of original oil paintings showcasing my distinctive...

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Loire Valley Wines
May13

Loire Valley Wines

Wine Observed: Loire Valley Wines by Marty Ramsburg The Loire Valley in France is known both for its magnificent chateaux and their parks and gardens — Chenonceau, Chambord, Amboise, Villandry, et. al. and, for their stunning white wines.The section of the Loire known for its wines is above Burgundy, south of Paris. Its latitude would match up more with Montreal and, while the Loire River moderates the extreme winter one might expect, there is still plenty of winter and a long spring with a growing season that favors white wines. We learned, however, that global warming has moved up the maturation period by nearly 3 weeks over the past 20 years, allowing red varieties to experience more favorable conditions for ripeness. Frank and I have just returned from the Loire area of France and are eager to share our experience with those varied and delicious wines. Each of the winemakers we visited is a small, still family-held and run producer, often with just 2-4 family members working year-round, sometimes hiring others during harvest. Each with whom we met blanched a bit when we used the term “winemaker,” noting that they let the wine make itself, to express the terroir from which it derives. They are “vignerons,” people who care for the vines and indeed, each with whom we met had dirt embedded in his or her hands and under their respective nails. After all, caring for the vines and beginning the springwork in the vineyards is dirty work. Sauvignon Blanc may be the most widely planted white varietal in the Loire, but the most noteworthy AOCs within the Sauvignon Blanc growing area are Pouilly-Fumé and Sancerre. Both have undergone an evolution in the past 20 years, with Sancerre perhaps more quality-conscious across its villages than Pouilly-Fumé. Historically, Sauvig-non Blanc from the Loire showed aromas and flavors of spring—green peas, new grass, asparagus along with racy acidity. More and more, however, we find those aromas supplanted by riper, mellower flavors of melon and peach, with a beautiful, compelling minerality to entice us. We visited two excellent Sancerre producers and can highly recommend anything they produce—Domaine Henry Natter and Domaine Claude Riffault.  Henry Natter is located in Montigny, the southernmost of the 14 villages that make up the Sancerrois appellation. The estate was started by Henry and his wife, Cécile, in 1974. While they remain the only estate in Montigny, they have grown from half a hectare to 23 hectares, 18 of which are Sauvignon Blanc, 5 are Pinot Noir. Mercifully, Henry and Cécile, have been joined by their daughter, Mathilde, and son,Vincent to share the labor. Cécile, now assisted by Vincent, eschewed...

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