Food town: Brattleboro’s burgeoning culinary creativity
Sep01

Food town: Brattleboro’s burgeoning culinary creativity

By Joyce Marcel While Brattleboro was priding itself on being an arts town, was it secretly turning into a food town? Or maybe, one simply follows the other and it’s not such a secret after all? “There are so many of us to choose from, you never have to travel far from your home,” said restaurateur/chef Ken Flutie. His intimate Blue Moose Bistro, across from the Latchis Theatre, anchors the lower part of Main Street. Flutie is right. In just a few short blocks — all in walking distance — you can find daily Thai and Korean food, Indian take-out three days a week, Mediterranean food, hamburgers, barbecue, upscale pizza, Turkish kebabs, crepes, fish and chips and Mayan cuisine. There’s a bakery, several coffee shops and three craft breweries. The Whetstone Station, located right on the Connecticut River, packs them in with bar food, its own beers and a nationally praised selection of craft beers. The Backside Cafe does breakfast and lunch for the business crowd. The Brattleboro Food Co-op serves a different organic menu every day. Just down the road is the Brattleboro Farmers’ Market open on Saturdays. On the upscale dining side, Duo, Peter Havens, The Blue Moose and T.J. Buckley’s serve haute American cuisine using farm-fresh ingredients — Vermont terroir leads the way! “We’re partnering with more than 25 local farmers and food artisans, cheese-makers and chocolate makers,” said Stephanie Bonin of Duo. “If you count brewers, the number shoots way past 25.” Bonin and her husband, Keith Arnold, co-own Duo restaurants in Denver and Brattleboro. Do those towns even belong in the same sentence? Thanks to Bonin and Arnold they do. Bonin was behind the bar, putting away glasses and getting ready to open for the evening crowd. Already that afternoon she had held an advanced wine-tasting seminar for her wait staff; they had discussed three of the white wines on Duo’s exhaustive 50-bottle list. “How do you even begin to navigate it?” Bonin said. “We have some education every night — about the food, the politics of the food (for example GMOs) and the wine.” The Denver iteration of Duo has made “Best of” lists for the whole of its 10-year existence. But when it came time to raising their children, the couple chose to live in Bonin’s hometown of Brattleboro. The fact that they early on claimed the anchor spot in the fire-devastated Brooks House, with its large windows facing Main and High streets, helped enormously as developers raised the capital to rebuild and restore the 1871, Mansard-roofed building in the center of town. Now that it’s perfectly restored, the couple is giving...

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Northern Stage: Self-sustaining regional theater in White River Junction
Sep01

Northern Stage: Self-sustaining regional theater in White River Junction

By Katherine P. Cox It was a good run – 18 years – at the Briggs Opera House in White River Junction, but it was time for Northern Stage to move on, said Eric Bunge, managing director of the regional theater. The old opera house presented severe limitations for professional productions, and two years ago the non-profit theater board members looked at their options. They opted to launch a capital campaign to build a new theater, brought in Eric Bunge from Minnesota, and embarked on a remarkable journey that resulted in raising almost $9 million in a short period of time from a supportive community that didn’t want to see the lights go down for good on their theater. Fittingly, “Our Town” opens in the new Barrette Center for the Arts, named for patrons Cyn and Ray Barrette, in October, exactly one year after breaking ground. “It was do this or think about wrapping things up,” Bunge said. “It was clear that they wanted to build a new theater.” Carol Dunne, artistic director, was instrumental in bringing Bunge on board in March 2013 to begin the process of developing a plan for a new space. Bunge, who had founded the Commonweal Theater in Lanesboro, Minnesota, in 1989, in turn brought Minnesota colleagues Irene Green, marketing director, and Amanda Rafuse, development director. The three had experience building a new theater and quickly got to work engaging the community on the new project. When talking about their mission, they sound more like community organizers than theater people. Their approach, said Green, was to try to eliminate perceived barriers to going to the theater and asking, “what can we do for the citizens? We’re dedicated to the well-being of the community and our patrons. We want to bring people together for a meaningful experience.” Accessibility is key, and to that end volunteer drivers have been enlisted to bring people who might not drive or have cars to the shows, such as college students or the elderly. Cost can be a barrier, as well, and creative ticket and membership pricing will help move Northern Stage from a patron-derived revenue source to a membership model, Green said. By making a night at the theater affordable, more people are likely to come, and then become sustaining members. “We came in as a team and focused on community engagement, meeting and greeting people,” Rafuse said. “We removed barriers to participation and deepened peoples’ connection. We sat down with everyone and inspired their passion. We connected people to the work that was happening in the building. They want to be part of it. There’s a thirst for...

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Springfield retools: A mill town looks to the past to create its future
Sep01

Springfield retools: A mill town looks to the past to create its future

By Lynn Barrett and Christine Rolland The story of Springfield, Vermont might echo the tales of many rust-belt towns across the country which are facing changing times. Mention Springfield, and someone will immediately say, “The Simpsons,” thanks to its winning the right to be considered Homer Simpson’s “real” home and to premiere The Simpsons Movie in 2007. But the town has a colorful and inventive history that goes beyond the Simpsons event, which was only one of many steps along the path that charted a new dynamic for the former industrial community, whose population has dipped below its 20th-century level. During the height of the Industrial Revolution, factories in the center of town lining the shore of the Black River hid the Comtu (“Big Noise”) Falls. There, visionary inventors created the objects to which Springfield owes its illustrious history, and today, that creative imagination is resurfacing. In the last quarter of the 19th century, Springfield attracted a variety of singularly innovative individuals who not only specialized in gear design and production but also invented a diverse array of items we now take for granted: the movable-limb doll, the common clothespin (two wooden prongs joined by a spring), the steam shovel, the corn planter, hay and straw cutters, the mop wringer, a sheep-shearing machine, and guitar and violin cases. Then, in the early 20th century, Precision Valley, as the town came to be known, began supplying unique high-caliber gear shapers and grinders internationally. By mid-century, Springfield produced 10 percent of the nation’s machine tools: these particular inventions generated the actual elements that made mass industry possible: accurate machines to produce gears. The town, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, became such a major manufacturing center that it was listed as number seven on Hitler’s list of cities to bomb during World War II. Post-war Springfield prospered and placed high value on both education and innovation. The steady population of 10,000 was made up of stable working-class people — characterized by inventiveness, creativity, native stubbornness, and toughness — were employed in the agricultural, commercial, and professional sectors. Students systematically scored in the highest percentiles for national exams and competitions. The high school was also a regional vocational school. Cooperative programs developed with local factories meant that these students graduated straight into stable jobs. Prosperity continued until increasing fissures produced labor disputes; in the 1970s, unemployment rates increased in line with national trends. By the 1980s, jobs were being shipped overseas, and factories started to close. One large employer became a new high-security state prison. By the time of the early 21st-century housing and financial crises, Main Street had become...

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Mitchell-Giddings: Matching artist with collector
Sep01

Mitchell-Giddings: Matching artist with collector

By Arlene Distler Celebrating its first year anniversary, Mitchell-Giddings Fine Art is a sleek and airy gallery in Brattleboro, designed with plenty of wall and floor space to show the kind of large-scale work favored by so many contemporary artists. The space was formerly a basement recording studio that the couple totally renovated. Brattleboro, known as an art town, nevertheless has not had a gallery like this. Owners Petria Mitchell and Jim Giddings have been important mainstays of the art scene in Southern Vermont for decades. Both painters, they were founding members of the Windham Art Gallery, a much loved co-operative gallery in Brattleboro that had a twenty year run, closing in 2009. In addition, for many years both Giddings and Mitchell have been intrinsic to the running of the Brattleboro Museum and Art Center – Giddings working on installations and lighting and Mitchell chair of exhibitions with some curating along the way. Curating, says Mitchell, is something she’s excited to be doing more of in her new role as gallery owner: “Curating provides the opportunity to bring artist and collector together. Connecting people that are passionate about sharing the mystery of creativity is the reward…and if we can help artists to be sustainable while pursuing their creative lives we would have achieved part of our mission.” “We are so gratified,” says Mitchell, “by the positive feedback from artists, visitors to the gallery, and, happy to say, buyers.” To bring about a greater appreciation and understanding of the work they show, MGFA has instituted “Artist Talks” given by the featured artist. These “value added” events have been very beneficial to both the artist and community, Mitchell feels. The long-range plan is to hold more community events in the gallery, such as poetry readings, made possible by moveable walls. At its Grand Opening last September that was attended by over 600 people, the works of seven artist and crafts people among the most accomplished in the area, were represented. Besides Mitchell and Giddings, the original roster was made up of: Doug Trump (painting and collage), Lauren Olitski (painting), Stephen Proctor (large ceramic vessels), Josh Bernbaum (glass), and Christine Triebert (photography). Since then, the gallery has added eight artists to the roster: Michelle and David Holzapfel, wood sculpture and furniture; Eric Cruze and Tomo Sakai who co-create glass; David Rohn, Watercolors; Lauren Pollaro assemblage collage; Willey Finkel, Ceramics; and most recently, Jackie Abrams who creates fine woven baskets. Giddings says they are taking on new artists every month. They hope to eventually represent 25 artists and to fill the ranks they will go outside the region. The reason, Mitchell explains, is,...

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Wilburton Inn: Family, theater, creativity and glitz
Sep01

Wilburton Inn: Family, theater, creativity and glitz

By Joyce Marcel Here’s a description of Manchester’s Wilburton Inn from Country Life magazine in October of 1933: “Splendidly constructed of tapestry brick, (it) crowns a steep, picturesque eminence approach over a well-built drive winding 1,000 feet or more up… Surrounded by charming gardens and delightful wall terraces, it commands superb panoramic views…an excellent trout stream and. many acres of lovely woodland on the slope of the foothills.” Over the years, this stately, dignified, lovely old mansion, hung with stunning crystal chandeliers and furnished with antiques, has witnessed many lives. It’s been a private home, a school for children of Berlin’s artists and high society who escaped the Nazis, and an exclusive inn for sporting ladies and gentlemen. In the 1970s it was owned by a film studio, RKO, and became a retreat for movie stars and film executives as well as for the country club set. Now it’s bursting with family, theater, creativity and glitz. It specializes in costumed murder mystery weekends (the guests wear formal attire), Downton Abbey weekends (the guests dress accordingly), Goddess weekends, weddings, yoga retreats, mindfulness retreats, writing retreats, silent mediation retreats, business retreats and disco dancing on Thursdays. As the current owners sing, “We didn’t buy it/ to run it as a Hyatt.” An inn is about the people who run it — that’s what makes a personal experience for the guests. The current iteration of the Wilburton Inn began in 1987, when Dr. Albert Levis, a Connecticut psychiatrist, and his wife, Georgette Wasserstein Levis, bought the building and 30 acres of grounds and started running a B&B for country weddings and romantic weekends. The first thing they added was a little spice. “When RKO owned the inn, they had a relationship with one of the local golf clubs,” said hostess, performer, songwriter and Wilburton Inn mistress of ceremonies Melissa Levis. “When we bought it, every room had twin beds — even in the bridal suite. My mother shook things up. She put a king bed in the bridal suite and all the guests stopped coming. We changed our identity completely.” The Wilburton can accommodate 125 guests in nine buildings on the property. The mansion itself is rented as a private home — “You can be your own robber baron,” Melissa joked. Theatricality runs in this family’s bloodlines. Georgette Levis, who died in 2014, was the sister of the late award-winning playwright Wendy Wasserstein. Wasserstein’s semi-autobiographical play, “The Sisters Rosensweig,” features a character called Gorgeous who is based on Georgette. (Gorgeous was her family nickname.) Madeline Kahn won the best actress Tony Award in 1993 for playing her. “I was in bed with...

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Scroll up: Terry Hauptman’s dancing, vibrant drawings
Sep01

Scroll up: Terry Hauptman’s dancing, vibrant drawings

By Arlene Distler This is Terry Hauptman’s moment. One of her works on paper, from the group of large drawings in ink and acrylics she calls “scrolls,” will be part of a group show at the Brattleboro Museum & Art Center in October titled “Drawing On, In, Out.” The same month her “Songline Scrolls” will grace the walls of the Robert H. Gibson River Garden, just in time to serve as sublime backdrop for the Brattleboro Literary Festival. Since Hauptman is also a published and highly regarded poet she is, she says, very happy about the timing for that exhibit. A “moment” is arrived at via many moments. For Hauptman, an especially important moment was when Mara Williams, chief curator at the Brattleboro Museum & Art Center, came to “First Night,” a New Year’s Eve celebration in Burlington. Hauptman had a show up, and Williams walked into the gallery. She was impressed and asked for a studio visit “sooner than later.” Williams loved what she saw and chose one large scroll, “The Singing of the Soul is the Nature of Art Itself,” to go into the BMAC show. Williams calls Hauptman’s work, “mysterious, worshipful, and joyous.” Walking into the River Garden on an impulse was another fortuitous “moment.” There she met Stacy Conn, manager at the time of the Strolling of the Heifers office. While Hauptman says she’d been thinking about the River Garden as an ideal place to show her scrolls for years (there are not many venues with comparable uninterrupted wall space), everything seemed to click into place that day. “There was a spark,” says the artist. “I felt Stacy and I understood each other, and she was enthusiastic about the work.” Furthermore, while in the past there was no full-time presence at the River Garden, and therefore a risk to hang work there, now, with the Strolling office open all day, and volunteer “ambassadors” at the entrance to greet visitors, that risk factor was no longer a big concern. Hauptman’s work is a dancing, vibrant intertwining of cultures: Judaic, Arabic, Native American, Christian, to name a few. As a young woman she traveled to many countries, and throughout the United States. “Geography,” she says, “swims inside the pieces.” New Mexico’s indigenous culture was a particularly strong influence, the dominance of turquoise and other vibrant colors. “But really,” she says, her poet coming to the fore, “it’s about interior geographies.” If she hadn’t traveled anywhere, she asserts, her art might still look like this. Nevertheless, there are moments. When in Ireland many years ago Hauptman had the opportunity to see The Book of Kells, an illuminated manuscript...

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Talk of the Arts: Bennington Museum engineers “creative collisions”
Sep01

Talk of the Arts: Bennington Museum engineers “creative collisions”

By Robert Wolterstorff A museum can’t just be about old art by dead artists—it’s got to be about the present, and inspire the future. That conviction has been driving all the recent changes at the Bennington Museum. Our goal, simply stated, is to be more edgy, more relevant, and more deeply embedded in the southern Vermont community. That’s why we have created new galleries for photography and Bennington Modernism, why we’re hosting events like a forum on economic development and a “one-night living tattoo exhibition,” and why we’re creating ground-breaking exhibitions like this summer’s show of Folk and Outsider Art, and Milton Avery’s Vermont in 2016. Bennington Museum was founded in 1852 as the Bennington Historical Association. In the 1920s it became a collecting museum. Eventually, it acquired portraits, furniture, Bennington pottery, landscape paintings, and the largest public collection of works by Grandma Moses, so it became a museum of art as well as history. Our diverse collections range from letters written by George Washington to contemporary art. How to present such diverse material? The traditional way would be a wing for art over here and a wing for history over there, but we find that arbitrary and uninteresting. Much more exciting is to install art and history side-by-side, bringing things of different type and period into lively conversation. For example, in the new “Gilded Age Vermont” gallery some of the greatest artworks in the museum—paintings by William Morris Hunt and Frederick MacMonnies—rub shoulders with industrial patent models, Tiffany glass, an automobile made in Bennington, and a parlor organ. Fine art and industrial manufactures are presented as equals, with the result that a new, holistic sense of creativity emerges. Artistic “creation” and industrial “invention” are related. The process of intuition and experiment that creates a painting or poem suddenly seems not that different from the one that invents a new product or a new industrial procedure. We also make connections across time. Alice Neel/Erastus Salisbury Field, our big summer show in 2014, brought together two great American portrait painters who were separated by 100 years. By hanging their works side-by-side, we learned about the continuity of humanity across the centuries. It also led to new revelations about Neel’s artistic vision, and the show won accolades in The Wall Street Journal in December as one of the nine “most memorable exhibitions” of 2014, putting Bennington Museum in select company with the Metropolitan Museum, MoMA, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the National Gallery of Art, and the National Gallery of Canada. As we go forward re-thinking and reinstalling the museum, we will engineer more of these “creative collisions” that make...

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Planning to win: Regional business competition highlights entrepreneurs
Sep01

Planning to win: Regional business competition highlights entrepreneurs

Congratulations to the winners of the Strolling of the Heifers and the Brattleboro Development Credit Corporation Business Planning Competition. A total of $64,000 in prize funds were given out: $10,000 to each of four first-place category winners, $3,000 each to the four second-place category winners, and $1,000 each to the 12 runners-up. Funding for the competition came from a grant from the Windham County Economic Development program (the “Vermont Yankee settlement” fund), the Vermont Community Foundation and the Windham Foundation. Here are the first-place winners: Farm-Food Division New Business: Riversong Farm, South Newfane (owners: Juliette Carr, Henry Carr): A new, small, diversified farmstead in Newfane, offering pastured heritage pork, fine charcuterie and breeding stock. Existing Business: The Bunker Farm, Dummerston (owners: Noah Hoskins, Helen O’Donnell, Jen O’Donnell and Mike Euphrat): The Farm is family-run and produces and sells pasture-raised poultry, beef, lamb and pork directly through a 12-month CSA. They also produce and sell maple syrup, winter greens, strawberries, asparagus, and heirloom and beefsteak tomatoes. They also operate a plant nursery and offer educational opportunities to local schools and community groups. General Business Division New Business: Wheel Pad, Wilmington (owners: Julie Lineberger, Joseph Cincotta, Riley Poor): A Wheel Pad is an eco-friendly, free-standing bedroom and bathroom structure for newly wheelchair-bound people. Pre-built, Wheel Pad is delivered then attached to an existing home on site. Existing Business: Good Body Products, Guilford (owners: Chris Thomas, Trish Thomas): Good Body Products crafts therapeutic body care products in small batches using 100 percent organic and locally-sourced ingredients whenever possible. They are striving to achieve a true “farm-to-jar” business model, cultivating and processing their own botanicals for use in their healing...

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Art for the Heart: A cardiologist’s gallery
Sep01

Art for the Heart: A cardiologist’s gallery

By Kevin O’Connor Dr. Mark Burke, a board member of the Vermont Arts Council, has seen his share of unusual galleries, be it in basements, warehouses or garages. But that’s not what inspired the Brattleboro cardiologist to create his own space in an even less typical location: His hospital examination and waiting rooms. “We opened this office,” he recalls, “and had a lot of empty walls.” Burke, a writer and photographer in his free time, could have hammered a few nails and hung some of his own work. Instead, he has teamed with the Brattleboro Museum & Art Center to create a series of specially curated exhibits titled “Art for the Heart.” Travel up the elevator (or, as the doctor would advise, the stairs) to Brattleboro Memorial Hospital’s Center for Cardiovascular Health and you’ll walk into a modern medical suite where the pastoral views from the windows have to compete with the nearby art. Most people will recognize the iconic Vermont red barns and blue skies of East Barnard printmaker Sabra Field’s “Green Mountain Mowing.” Blurs of black and white are clearly cows in Brattleboro artist Deedee Jones’ pastel landscape “Summer Idyll.” And sepia-toned oils convey an equally vivid picture in Bellows Falls painter Charlie Hunter’s “Potato Barn.” Together, the current exhibit, titled “Scenes from New England,” offers “an exploration of the region we call home — the landscape we move through every day, the vistas we delight in contemplating, the shifting seasons we alternately glory in and grumble about,” its brochure explains. “Art offers us a chance to reflect upon elements of the world around us that we may overlook as we rush through the business of our lives.” For the first show in the fall of 2013, the museum contacted and collaborated with individual artists, only to streamline the process in subsequent exhibits with help from Vermont Artisan Designs, a Main Street gallery that both supplies and can sell the paintings, prints and photographs. The project has two purposes, museum director Danny Lichtenfeld says. “We assume people are arriving with a high level of stress,” Lichtenfeld begins, “so let’s counter that.” The show also spotlights 18 of the “many highly accomplished, talented, and thoughtful artists living and working in our region.” Putney painter Deborah Lazar is used to showing her art in singular places, having made a name for herself regionally by restoring a turn-of-the-century Carter’s Little Liver Pills advertisement atop a downtown Brattleboro building. “I’m so happy to have my paintings in any place where people can see them,” Lazar says. “I go where my brush dictates.” Each cardiology suite exhibit stays in place for six...

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118 Elliot: A stylish new arts and education venue
Sep01

118 Elliot: A stylish new arts and education venue

Once home to the storied Lawrence Water Cure and more recently an abandoned laundromat, the building now known as 118 Elliot is now a stylish new arts and education venue breathing life to a neglected area of Downtown Brattleboro. A flexible, modern environment that is fully ADA accessible, the space can accommodate anything from small screenings, music and intimate theater to workshops, conferences, production offices, art and other small-scale exhibitions and events for gatherings up to 200. A full kitchen for parties and sit down dinners allows performances to seamlessly transform into social events. A large outdoor area and garden in back accommodates open air events with indoor back-up and plenty of parking at the transportation center next door (free after 6pm) and handicap spots on site give the venue a unique profile in crowded Downtown. Owners John Loggia and Lissa Weinmann, who work with a variety of institutions in Brattleboro and New York, say they created the space with non-profits in mind. “We listened to what people said they needed, so that guided our design. We want groups to be able to come in and make the place their own,” said Weinmann, pointing out that a very visible marquee will help groups advertise events. “The reception has been gratifying,” Weinmann says, “I think we tapped into some pent-up demand.” 118 Elliot debuts this fall with the Vermont Performance Lab’s “Promenade Mobile” over Labor Day weekend. A puppet workshop and performance for Sandglass Theatre’s ‘Puppets in the Green Mountains’ festival September 15 and 17 follows, and the Brattleboro Literary Festival takes-up residence the weekend of October 2 to 4 with a host of activities including its famed “Literary Death Match.” For information on rentals and upcoming events, visit...

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Headaches from wine? It’s not the sulfites
Sep01

Headaches from wine? It’s not the sulfites

By Marty Ramsburg At least once a week, someone comes into the shop asking for sulfite-free wine because, he or she says, sulfites give him or her headaches. Because we are asked so frequently, we have done some modest investigation into the possible causes of wine headaches. Sulfites Sulfites are often added to wine to neutralize the bacteria that, over time, can produce chemical reactions that result in unpleasant aromas and flavors. While data do not support a causal link between sulfites and headaches, some asthmatics are hyper-sensitive to them, leading the Food and Drug Administration to require labeling—“contains sulfites,” for wines with sulfite levels above 10 parts per million (ppm). Often people tell us that they are able to drink more wine while on holiday, yet experience no negative physical reaction. Europe does not require the sulfite warning, so absent the warning, people assume that wines sent to America are sulfited and therefore contain higher levels that merit a warning. When we visit producers abroad, we have asked if there is any difference between the wine they sell locally and that which ships to the US. Uniformly, the response is no. Yeasts naturally produce sulfur dioxide during their chemical interactions with other compounds, so products made with yeast or that go through fermentation, like the lactic acid fermentation associated with pickling, contain sulfites. Beer, bread, cheese, cured meats, dried fruits (think apricots or raisins), molasses, and pickles, among others, all contain sulfites. Histamines These compounds cause blood vessels to dilate, which often manifests as redness in the face, inflammation and can contribute to headaches. Those who have a sensitivity to histamines lack an enzyme in their intestines that helps metabolize it. Histamines are found in the skins of grapes and, since red wines spend more time in contact with their skins, they are in higher concentration in red wines. Other foods high in histamines that may induce a similar reaction include other fermented beverages and foods, aged cheese, cured meats, nuts, certain vegetables like avocados, eggplant and tomatoes, and vinegar-containing foods like pickles and olives. Tyramines Another headache-inducing substance naturally occurring in some foods and produced in others via fermentation, aging or spoilage is tyramine. Tyramines first constrict, then dilate blood vessels, the sequence associated with migraines. There is an enzyme in the liver and the brain, Monoamine oxidase (MAO), that metabolizes tyramine. When that enzyme is inhibited, then tyramines can build up to levels that produce headaches and increase blood pressure. Tyramine is especially concentrated in foods that are preserved, fermented or aged for a long time. Interestingly, tyramine concentrations vary by varietal, region, and age of...

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Farmers’ Markets
Sep01

Farmers’ Markets

For more information about Farmers’ Markets in Southern Vermont, including a full schedule of market days/hours, visit nofavt.org. Most Farmers’ Markets in Vermont close by the end of October. Every Saturday Brattleboro Farmers’ Market, Western Avenue (just west of Creamery Covered Bridge), Brattleboro, 9a – 2p, http://www.brattleborofarmersmarket.com. Norwich Farmers’ Market, Route 5 south in Norwich, 9a-1p,www.norwichfarmersmarket.org. Bennington Walloomsac Farmers’ Market at the Bennington Station, 10a-1p, 802 442-8934. Londonderry – West River Farmers’ Market, routes 11 and 100, 9a-1p, 802 824-4492. Rutland Downtown Farmers’ Market, Depot Park, 9a-2p, 802 747-4403. Springfield Community Market, People’s Bank Parking Lot, 10a-1p,www.springfieldonthemove.com. Wilmington Farmers’ Market, Main Street, Wilmington, 10a-3p, 802 464-9069. Woodstock – Mt. Tom Farmers’ Market, Mt. Tom Parking Lot, 9:30a-12:30p,www.mttomfarmersmarket.com. Every Sun Jamaica Farmers’ Market, Main Street, Jamaica, 10a-2p,www.jamaicavt.com, 802 874-4151. Chester Farmers’ Market, at Zachary’s Pizza House, 11am-2pm, 802 875-2703. Dorset Farmers’ Market at HN Williams Store, 10am-2pm, 802 558-8511. Putney Farmers’ Market, at the Putney Co-op, 10a-2p,www.putneyfarmersmarket.com. Stowe Farmers’ Market, intersection of routes 100 and 108, Stowe, 10:30a-3p,www.stowefarmersmarket.com. Windsor Farmers’ Market, on the green (State St), 11:30a-2:30p, windsorfarmersmarket.blogspot.com. Every Tuesday Rutland Downtown Farmers’ Market, Depot Park, 2-6p,www.rutlanddowntown.com. Every Wednesday Brattleboro Farmers’ Market, on the Whetstone Pathway, 10a-2p,www.brattleborofarmersmarket.com. Woodstock Farmers’ Market, on the Green, 3-6p,www.woodstockvt.com. Every Thursday Poultney Farmers’ Market, Main Street, 9a-2p, 802 287-2460. Manchester Farmers’ Market, Adams Park, Manchester, 3-6p,www.manchestermarket.org. Castleton Village Farmers’ Market, Main St, Castleton, 3:30-6p, 802 273-2241. Royalton Farmers’ Market, South Royalton Town Green, 3-6:30p, 802 763-6630. Every Friday Bellows Falls Farmers’ Market, Waypoint Center, 4-7p,www.bffarmersmarket.com. Brandon Farmers’ Market, Central Park, Brandon, 9a-2p, 802 247-8473. Fair Haven Farmers’ Market, The Park, 3-6p, 802 265-4240. Ludlow Farmers’ Market, 4-7p, Main Street, 802 734-3829. Hartland Farmers’ Market, Hartland Town Library, 4-7p, 802 296-2032. West Townshend Farmers’ Market, West Townshend Country Store,...

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