Maple Open Houses
Jan28

Maple Open Houses

Maple Open House Weekend Visitors are welcome at sugarhouses all over Vermont on March 24 and 25, 2012 Pictured: “Sugaring Season” 6-color embossed linoleum block print by William H. Hays, courtesy The Artist’s Loft Fine Art Gallery, Brattleboro The 11th Annual Open House Weekend is a celebration of the maple syrup season and an opportunity to visit one or more “sugarhouses” throughout the state to learn about Vermont’s first agricultural crop of the year. Activities during this free event may vary at each sugarhouse. You will have the opportunity to watch maple syrup being made (weather permitting) and to sample pure Vermont maple syrup and other maple products. Here are some of the participating sugarhouses in Southern Vermont: Black Bear Sugarworks287 Locust Hill Road, Guilford, VT 05301802-257-4278, info@blackbearsugarworks.comhttp://www.blackbearsugarworks.com Evans Maple Farm61 Spaulding Hill Rd, E. Dummerston, VT 05346802-257-0262, roger@evansmaplefarm.comhttp://www.evansmaplefarm.com Green Mountain Sugar House820 Rte 100N, Ludlow, VT 05149802-228-7151, gmsh@tds.net, http://www.gmsh.com Hidden Springs Maple162 Westminster West Rd, Putney, VT 053461-888-889-8781, info@hiddenspringsmaple.comhttp://www.hiddenspringsmaple.com Havoc Hill Sugarhouse190 Havoc Hill, East Dorset, VT 05253802-362-4136, havochil@myfairpoint.net Jim and Josie’s Maple Syrup1055 VT Route 11, Londonderry, VT 05148802-824-3295, windrows@sover.net Mitch’s Maple2440 Green Mtn Turnpike, Chester, VT 05143802-228-5242, cpmit@tds.net Robb Family Farm822 Ames Hill Rd, Brattleboro, VT 05301802-258-9087robbfarm@together.net, http://www.robbfamilyfarm.com Smith Family Maple327 Atcherson Hollow Rd, Cambridgeport, VT 05141802-869-2417, smithfamilymaple@hotmail.com Sweet Maple Alpaca Farm, LLC154 River Rd, Westminster, VT 05346802-376-9846 or 802-380-0750info@sweetmaplealpacas.comhttp://www.sweetmaplealpacas.com The Corse Farm773 Corse Rd, Whitingham, VT 05361802-368-2420, thecorsefarm@myfairpoint.net Wood’s Cider Mill & Sugar House1482 Weathersfield Ctr Rd, Springfield, VT...

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Discerning the taste of maple
Jan28

Discerning the taste of maple

Discerning the Taste of Maple A team of researchers, sugarmakers and sensory panelists collaborated over several years by evaluating maple syrup from throughout the state of Vermont to describe the terroir or taste of place of Vermont maple syrup, using a unique sensory map that captures the delicious qualities of Vermont Maple syrup.This interesting sensory tool was jointly developed by Professor Amy Trubek author of 2008 The Taste of Place, A Cultural Journey Into Terroir, and Montserrat Almena Ph.D a sensory scientist from the Nutrition and Food Sciences Department, along with Maple specialist and Consumer Protection Section Chief Henry Marckres from the Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets.Researchers at the Middlebury College were also involved.By conducting hundreds of maple syrup tastings, the Vermont team was able to distinguish 9 categories of maple odor and flavor (maple, toasted, milky, confectionary, spice, fruity, floral, earthy, and others).Try it. Smell the syrup before tasting. See if you can identify any distinct flavors. Refer to the “aroma” sensory descriptors if you need a guide.• Take a small sip of the syrup. Hold it in your mouth briefly, and make a note of the texture. See the “Mouthfeel” section for suggestions.• Assess the degree of intensity. How does the flavor of this syrup compare to others you’ve tried? The “Taste” section has some suggestions for describing these qualities.• If possible, taste with a friend and share your reactions with them. Sometimes discussing your experience with another person can help trigger memories and...

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Classes, workshops & residencies
Jan28

Classes, workshops & residencies

Classes, Workshop & Residencies In Vermont art flourishes year-round. There’s always a good time to learn, practice and perform. Here are a few programs and places to help you learn about classes or workshops in your area. Carving Studio and Sculpture Center636 Marble St, Rutlandcarvingstudio.org, 802 438-2097March 17-18: Introductory Stone Carving with Bill Nuff. April 21-22: Carving in Alabaster with Anne Dean. Residencies: Artists in Resi-dence are integral to the Carving Studio and Sculpture Center programming as they create sculpture and interact with the arts community. Chaffee Art Center16 South Main St, Rutlandchaffeeartcenter.org, 802 775-0356Feb 15-March 21: Creation Tales II for kids ages 1.5-8, with Rosemary Moser. March 11-12: Journal to the Self with Joanna Tebbs Young. March 31: Painting Spectacular Flowers in Watercolor with Robert O’Brien. Fletcher Farm School for the Arts and Crafts611 Route 103 South, Ludlowfletcherfarm.org, 802 228-8770Feb 4-5: Landscape Weaving with Carolyn Scott. Feb 11-12: Ribbon Work Pins with Cynthia Emerlye. Feb 11-12: Felting Lamb to Lamb with Sue Carey. Feb 18-19: Shaker Tape Chairs with Sandy Sherman. Feb 25-26: Acrylic Painting with Don Hofer. March 3-4: Solar Printing with Roger Hyndman. March 10-11: Nested Service Baskets with Judy Nevin. March 17-18: Punch Needle Rug Hooking with Layne Herschel. March 24-25: Digital Photography with Emmett Francois. March 24-25: Quilting Open Studio with Susan Balch. March 31-April 1: Cob Web & Silk Painting Scarves with Nancy Dorian. March 31-April 1: Silversmithing with Harold Bosco. April 14-15: H2O Color – Doors and Windows with Robert O’Brien. April 14-15: Quilting Open Studio with Susan Balch. April 21-22: Painting on Glass with Barbi Weaver. April 21-22: Woodcarving with Dave Tuttle. April 26-27: Digital Photography with Emmett Francois. Gallery at the VAULT68 Main St, Springfieldgalleryvault.org, 802 885-7111Jan 28: Winter Landscape Painting with Robert O’Brien. Feb 7: Mandalas: Exploring the Inner Self with Louise Max. Feb 25: It’s All About Light, with Robert Carsten. March 3: Paste Papers with Diane Kemble. March 10: Book-binding: Let’s Make a Journal, with Robyn Lantz. March 24: Colorful Impressionistic Pastels with Robert Carsten. March 31: Acrylic Painting, with Louise Max. April 28: Painting Spectacular Flowers, with Robert O’Brien. River Gallery School32 Main St, Brattlebororivergalleryschool.org, 802 257-1577Ongoing: The River Gallery School provides classes, studio space, and a working environment that encourages individual expression, where the visual arts and the creative process are explored and honored. Check the web site for a complete schedule of classes.River Rock Studio362 Dover Rd, S. Newfanerockriver-studio.com, 802 348-7440April 2, 6, 9, 20, 23, 27 & 30: Alternative Digital Printmaking. Ongoing: Year round classes include Graphic Design Boot Camp, and Visual Memoirs. See website for dates and times. Southern Vermont Arts Center, Hay Madeira Studios930 SVA Drive, West Road, Manchestersvac.org, 802 362-1405March...

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Tubing to Terroir
Jan28

Tubing to Terroir

Vermont Food & Wine Tubing to Terroir… Maple Comes of Age by Roger Allbee, former Secretary of Agriculture, Food and Markets for Vermont; Bruce Martell, former Maple Specialist for the State of Vermont; and Betty Ann Lockhart, author of Maple Sugarin’ in Vermont — A Sweet History.   The official contact for the Vermont Maple Industry is http://www.vtmaple.org. Maple is often called the “Soul of Vermont” as it has defined the regional character and the State from the earliest of times. The Eastern Woodland Indians were said to be the first to discover that the sweet sap from the maple tree in the spring could be cooked down to make a sugar high in energy and thus as a storable source of food. They gathered the sap by cutting a slash in the tree, and boiling sap in an open clay pot over a wood fire. The early European settlers in New England learned this process, and eventually improved upon it using wood and then metal or wooden spouts and metal pots instead of clay. They continued boiling it over an open fire just as the Native Indians had done before them. Jason Newton working at the new evaporator at Harlow’s Sugarhouse in Westminster.   Like many agricultural industries, technology has brought about multiple changes both in the sugarhouse and in methods used to collect the sap from the trees. While some maple sugar makers continue to use the “sap bucket” to collect sap from the tree during the spring season, more have embraced new technologies that make collecting the sap much easier and less labor intensive. Thus, each sugarhouse has its own personality, some deep in the woods using buckets and heating the evaporator with wood, and others, much larger, using the latest methods. No matter what technology is used, industry standards and the Vermont Maple Law result in the production of the highest quality pure maple syrup and syrup products. These technology changes keep Vermont in the forefront of pure maple syrup production in the Untied States, and because of these changes production has increased from where it was in the distant past. For example, in 2010, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Agricultural Statistics Service, Vermont sugar makers tapped approximately three million, two hundred thousand maple trees and produced eight hundred and ninety thousand gallons of syrup. This represented forty-six percent of U.S. maple production. In 2011, a banner year, Vermont sugarmakers produced more than a million gallons of maple syrup. The most advanced technologies employed include vacuum tubing from the tree to the sugarhouse, reverse osmosis to get the sap to a higher sugar content, and new...

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Biodynamic Wines
Jan28

Biodynamic Wines

Wine Observed: Biodynamic Wines by Marty Ramsburg What are Biodynamic® wines? Some people may explain that it is uber-organic,  but that does not accord Biodynamic practitioners the respect they deserve.Vinters who embrace Biodynamic principles also commit themselves not just to winemaking, but to farming. For those wine producers who adopt Biodynamic principles, the objective is to create a self-sufficient living organism by raising cattle, creating a seed bank from one’s own produce, producing feed, and creating fertilizers with farm-produced compost and manure. In addition, certain plants are grown from which herbal teas are made that are applied to the plants and the soil to promote the life of the soil. Werner Michlits, winemaker/beer maker/farm hand at Weingut Meinklang in Pamhagen, Austria, explains that “adherence to these principles leads to a harmonization of the living relationship between soil, plant and animal.A healthy soil produces healthy plants which in turn supply the nutritional requirements of man and animal.” What does this mean for wine produced on Biodynamic estates and for us as consumers? First, vines grown by Biodynamic principles are healthier and therefore have been more resistant to plant diseases and even extremes of weather. Second, the wines produced are the quintessential representatives of “terroir,” i.e., they express distinctions and nuances particular to the place where the vines are grown since nothing from beyond the farm has been added. Nicolas Joly, of Coulée de Serrant, describes Biodynamic principles as a way of “helping vines catch the climate and soil in the wine.” As consumers, we enjoy wines that give us a pure and unmodified expression of the grapes and the place. The resultant wines are alive and fresh; they have energy and identity. For those who want pure wines, these are your ticket—organically grown grapes, wild yeasts, minimal intervention in the cellar. How do you know which wines are Biodynamic? If they are certified, the Demeter® logo will be displayed somewhere on the back label. Since not all farms practicing Biodynamic principles are certified, you may need to check with an informed wine merchant. If you are interested in learning more about Biodynamic agriculture, Werner Michlits will be guiding a tasting with Windham Wines on Tuesday, February 28th. For details, call Windham Wines at 246-6400.___________Marty Ramsburg is co-owner with Frank Larkin of Windham Wines, one of Vermont’s premier wine and beer retailers. Next door is their Wine Gallery, a unique venue for special events and guided wine and beer tastings. 802 246-6400 Tues-Sat, 10-6p, 30-36 Main Street, Brattleboro. Windham Wines also sells wines at North End Butchers, 972 Putney Road, Brattleboro, Tues-Sat, 10-6p, Fri until 5.1...

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Winter Farmers Markets
Jan28

Winter Farmers Markets

Vermont Food and Wine Winter Farmers Markets Bennington: Walloomsac Winter Farmers’ Market, Jan 21, Feb 18, March 17, April 21, 10a-1p, at St. Peter’s Church, walloomsac.org, 802 688-7210. Brattleboro: Brattleboro Winter Farmers’ Market, Saturdays thru March, 10a-2p, at the River Garden, downtown Brattleboro, postoilsolutions.org, 802 869-2141. Dorset: Dorset Winter Farmers’ Market, Sundays thru Feb 19, 10a-2p, at J.K. Adams Kitchen Store, Rte 30, dorsetfarmersmarket.com, 802 876-7080. Ludlow: Ludlow Farmers Market, every Saturday thru March 3, at Ludlow Teen Center, 10a-1p, ludlowfarmersmarket.org, 802 734-3829. Montpelier: Capital City Farmers’ Market, first & third Saturday thru April, 10a-2p, Vermont College of Fine Arts gym, montpelierfarmersmarket.com, 802 223-2958. Norwich: Norwich Farmers’ Market, Jan 14, Feb 11, March 10, April 14, 10a-1p, at Tracy Hall on Main St, Norwich, norwichfarmersmarket.org, 802 384-7447. Rutland: Rutland Winter Farmers’ Market, Saturdays thru May, 10a-2p, at Old Strand Theater in downtown Rutland, vtfarmersmarket.org, 802 558-2137. Photo by Jason...

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Wild Carrot Farm
Jan28

Wild Carrot Farm

Vermont Food & Wine Wild Carrot Farm by Katherine P. Cox When Caitlin Burlett and Jesse Kayen got married last September, all the food for 200 guests was locally produced — from the small farm that they run with their friend and partner, Max Madalinski, in Brookline. Wild Carrot Farm has been all-consuming for the young couple since they joined forces with Max in 2010 to raise organic vegetables, chickens, turkeys and lambs for sale at their farmstand and through their CSA. Last summer was their first full season, and by all accounts, it was a success. They’re already fine-tuning and making plans for next season. To be a successful farmer in Vermont is not easy, but these three young farmers have a distinct approach and a valuable resource — they reclaimed land that was donated to them by Norman and Laura Solomon, who run Windmill Hill Alpaca Farm. Without the financial burden of buying land, which can be prohibitively expensive in southern Vermont, Caitlin, Jesse and Max have a fight-ing chance to make a go at growing vegetables and raising livestock at a time when farms nationwide are going under and young people are turning to other work. None of them grew up on a farm. Caitlin, 27, grew up near Buffalo, N.Y., and met Jesse at St. Mary’s College in Maryland. She was studying sociology and anthropology. Jesse, 27, who is from Northfield, Mass., was studying politics. Caitlin fell in love with farming during a summer job on a farm in Maryland and continued there after she graduated from college. She loved being outside, she said, and discovering vegetables she had never heard of before. At the same time, she got involved with the politics of food and “what organic really meant,” she said. Jesse was not interested in farming at the time, so when they graduated from college in 2006, they decided to go south and ended up in New Orleans where they ran a shelter for women and children. By 2008 they were burned out; “ready to leave the city and have a garden,” Jesse said. They set down roots in Newfane. Meanwhile Max, 25, who grew up in Chicago, attended Marlboro College, majoring in visual arts and Asian studies. During his college years, he said he had his own small gardens on rented property, but it wasn’t until after he graduated in 2009 that he decided he wanted to farm, and got a job at Peaked Mountain Farm, a sheep dairy farm in Townshend. There he learned to make cheese, bake artisanal bread and work with animals. Through a mutual friend, he met Jesse and Caitlin, who...

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Artful Shopping
Jan28

Artful Shopping

Artful Shopping There is a genuine joy to shopping with a mind for something above the ordinary, something one-of-a-kind and artfully unique. From art pottery to imported pashmina, the galleries, crafts boutiques and specialty shops in Southern Vermont’s small towns and historic villages are where you can discover beautiful things that feed your soul. Just as the Localvore and Slow Food movements took on the fast food chains, there is a cure for the big-box-shopping mentality and you are sure to find it in Southern Vermont. If you had to pick a special place in Southern Vermont to designate as the official “art town” it would have to be Putney (population, 2,500) at exit 4 off Interstate 91. There must be something in the water here or in the mountain air, maybe, which boosts both creative and independent thinking simultaneously. The town’s annual Putney Craft open studio tour is a cultural phenom, a living legacy to the arts in Southern Vermont. It has been going on now for 33 years and hundreds of people schedule their vacations around it. It is not just the art, or meeting the artists that makes the self-guided tour so successful, it is the chance to get close to the creative process and buy work directly from the artist who made it. From Putney you can go the back way through Saxton’s River (population, a scant 500) to Grafton, a small, picture perfect village centered at the intersections of scenic Routes 35 and 121, and a morning jaunt is nowhere near enough time to see everything. In Saxton’s River, you can stay and dine at the Saxton’s River Inn and enjoy an evening of entertainment at Main Street Arts. Inspired DowntownsIn the downtown area of Bellows Falls on a side window of the Exner Block Gallery just off the main drag, four words are perfectly lettered directly on the plate glass: Art makes a difference. Bellows Falls is a manufacturing town transformed into a place where everyone more or less expects everyone else to be interested in literature, arts and culture. The residents want more galleries, they want good theatre, they want the arts lifestyle because they consider all this attractive and even more importantly, they know it is essential to a good quality of life. From Bellows Falls, cross the bridges over the Connecticut River which is also the state line and head south a few miles on Route 12 to historic Walpole, New Hampshire. This is the place that renowned novelist James Michener described as the “quintessential New England village.” For that reason alone it is worth thedetour, but if you need another...

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VTica
Jan28

VTica

VTica by Arlene Distler One of the truly gratifying aspects of being a writer on the arts is witnessing close-up the dedication and passion of both artists and those whose desire it is to bring those artists’ work to the public eye.Vermont Institute of Contemporary Art (VTica), is a new non-profit arts venue that exemplifies this kind of dedication. The first show, which opened December 17th, and will go through the winter, is titled “Abstractions.” This is an extraordinary show, in an extraordinary space. To forge ahead as a “contemporary” artist in Vermont is to be singularly, perhaps even obsessively, dedicated to your art. There is not much in the way of monetary reward, or an embracing public. But if there is one person determined to change that, it is Robert Sarly. VTica is his vision, and he has spearheaded the project, aided and abetted by his partner in life and work, Abby Raeder. Through their efforts they are hoping to make abstract painting a more comfortable fit for Vermonters, and visitors to the state. Exposure is everything!   Perhaps Sarly and Raeder share my own suspicion that there are many more fans of abstract art than one might suppose, lurking in the hills and hamlets of the Green Mountains. After all, the Brattleboro Museum and Art Center, only an hour’s ride south, has thrived in recent years on a steady diet of exhibits that ask the viewer to stretch their notion of painting and sculpture. In shows such as “In The Zone”, a tri-annual show featuring work by artists within Vermont’s borders or within100 miles, there is no lack of non-representational work, be it repeated graphic elements on a grid, more “painterly” gestural painting, or anything in between or beside. But it is no secret that more realistic work finds a larger audience in these parts. And while abstract work may remain a more rarefied species, Sarly is determined to at the least expand the number of those who derive from it pleasure, and more––a means of spiritual connection and insight. He is clearly up to the task. At the culmination of several years’ worth of planning and renovation Vtica opened its doors officially in mid-December. Located in the center of Chester in the former American Legion building at 15 Depot Street, it is no ivory tower shrine to art––it is accessible and welcoming. In his address to the crowd opening night, Sarly, like a football coach giving a pep talk to his team at half-time, spoke of the need to “see ourselves differently”–– that with the interstate, and especially the internet, there is greater sophistication of the rural...

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Vermont Performance Lab
Jan28

Vermont Performance Lab

Vermont Performance Lab by Katherine P. Cox Many artist colonies provide artists a retreat from the distractions of the world to focus on their work. Vermont Performance Lab, an arts residency program based in Guilford, turns that notion on its head and encourages artists to get involved in the local community and engage residents in their work.Founded by Sara Coffey in 2006, the goal of VPL is to bring contemporary artists to Windham County, provide them support, foster their work, and connect them with local townspeople and communities — hopefully in an exchange of knowledge and ideas. “I’m interested in performance and culture and what performances can tell us about culture,” she said. “Our role is to ask, how can the work that artists are doing resonate with issues in our own communities?” Many of the artists at VPL create contemporary dance or musical works, performances that “can be difficult or unfriendly for a lot of people,” Coffey said, and she wants to lower the barriers between artists and the public. To that end, works in progress are screened at various local venues, artists present workshops where they talk about their work and help audiences understand their process, and collaborations with local schools invite student participation. Over the years, site-specific productions have been staged at places such as the train depots in Brattleboro and Bellows Falls, and more are in the works for this year.   “Accessibility to the arts in rural communities is not always there. I feel passionate that rural communities deserve to have this experience,” Coffey said. “We do some wacky stuff, but people are open and curious, even if they don’t like it.” Coffey and her husband, David Snyder, an independent music producer, moved to Guilford from New York in 2004. Coffey had graduated from Marlboro College in 1990 and the area was “familiar,” she said. She had spent 14 years in New York, working with cultural and arts organizations to develop multi-cultural community programming. “It informed how I think about things here in Vermont,” she said. Snyder wanted to build a recording studio, and “I always had this idea to create a residency space. But in New York, real estate was outrageously expensive.” Snyder did indeed build Guilford Sound, and Coffey established Vermont Performance Lab, which is based in Guilford, but is not where artists live, eat, or work, for the most part. The artists are infused into neighboring communities, helping the local economy and interacting with local residents. In so many ways, Coffey’s goal of bringing the arts to rural Vermont and supporting artists is being realized, and Windham County is benefitting. “Last...

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Bullish on Vermont Vermont Culture
Jan28

Bullish on Vermont Vermont Culture

Bullish on Vermont Culture Investing in Vermont — and the arts — comes naturally to the people here. In Putney, Next Stage Arts has launched a performing arts center in a historic church in the center of town. In Guilford, Sara Coffey’s Vermont Performance Lab offers residency programs for contemporary artists, provides them support, fosters their work, and connects them with local townspeople and communities — hopefully in an exchange of knowledge and ideas. In Chester, there is one person determined to bring attention to contemporary art. It is Robert Sarly. VTica is his vision. Next Stage — An Historic Church Repurposed by Katherine P. Cox Now that the Putney General Store has risen from the ashes and is again open for business, the Putney Historical Society and an ambitious group of residents have taken on another historical building in town and are bringing it back to life with music, movies and small stage performances.Next Stage Arts, a non-profit group formed in 2009 to look into converting the former United Church of Putney building into a performing arts center, has already done extensive work on the building and has hosted many musical performances produced by Yellow Barn Music and Twilight Music. There’s also an ongoing film series — every Friday night and a matinee on Saturday — that’s helping to make the center a vibrant part of the revitalization of Putney. A grant from Fresh Sound Foundation to fund a feasibility study brought together an assortment of talented townspeople to tackle questions of finances, programming, community support, and whether such an undertaking was indeed feasible. The advisory group included Chip Greenberg, an architect; Billy Straus, an independent music producer; Eric Bass, co-founder of Sandglass Theater; John Burt, an independent theatrical producer; and Barry Stockwell, head of the concert production company Twilight Music. Straus, who was tasked with studying comparable community arts organizations, found all the facilities were thriving, from the very small to the large. “It was very interesting. It was inspiring that all had found a balance in which they were able to carry out their vision within their communities,” he said. Next up: gauging community support. Several meetings were held where the pubic weighed in, and the response was enthusiastic and supportive. It was important to get community consensus because the building is central to the community of Putney, Straus said. “It’s important to a lot of folks and families in Putney,” he said. But, “the building is in dire need of tender loving care. The use of the building spoke to a possible future, but also came with challenges”: changing and updating an old structure and a...

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Catherine Dianich
Jan28

Catherine Dianich

Catherine Dianich Down an inviting alleyway, through glass doors and at the far end of a low-ceilinged lobby in an old brick industrial building repurposed into offices, retail stores and apartments, resides a unique Brattleboro gallery in an unlikely location behind floor-to-ceiling windows that make it seem like you’re entering an art-filled snow globe.That is how people first encounter Catherine Dianich Gallery, which for the past nine years has been a notable player in the town’s vibrant art scene, carving a path distinct from other galleries, reflecting the unique vision of its founder and owner. “I never intended to own a gallery. I was keenly interested in the curatorial process,” said Catherine Dianich. “In some ways, I’m not a traditional gallery. I might better be described as a curator/art consultant. I‘m interested in cultivating long-term relationships with artists, patrons and the community.”Whatever it is, the gallery is located in the small southeastern Vermont town Dianich first saw more than three decades ago. An aspiring and talented photographer, Dianich first came to the Brattleboro area to study with the renowned artist Fred Picker.“I drove into town and said ‘This is going to be my town,’ and 20 years later it became my town,” Dianich said.After studying with Picker, she moved on to take advantage of the opportunity of a lifetime — a chance to study photography with Ansel Adams. So she moved to California around 1980 to learn from the master.“He was just such a heroic figure…to even be in his presence,” she said. “I was much younger. I think he was just really drawn to young people with ideas. …I still use the same film, paper and developer as I used with him.”After that, she moved on and nurtured her interest in curatorial work by helping to launch the nonprofit Delaware Center for Contemporary Arts.“We were working with artists who were doing work that was really on the cutting edge. That was very exciting, and that’s a piece that I bring to the gallery,” she said. “I’m interested in showing work that I want people to have a dialogue with.”She kept her promise to herself by moving to Brattleboro in 2002, where she intended to set up shop as a curator and consultant. She worked with the Brattleboro Museum & Art Center to curate a show of work by photographer Justine Kurland. But Dede Cummings, a local designer and writer who shares office space with Dianich, urged her to turn the unlikely space in the lobby of the Hooker-Dunham building into a gallery. It very quickly established itself as a unique player in the local arts scene, showing work...

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